LaToya Dennis

Same-Sex Weddings Could Greatly Impact Wisconsin's Wedding Industry

It’s May in Wisconsin, which means invitations for those summer weddings are beginning to hit the mail. What’s new this year, here and in many states, is the fact that same-sex partners can now marry.
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When a girl was stabbed 19 times in a Waukesha park last May, the suspects were 12 years old, so under state law, they head directly to adult court. The judge will decide whether they belong there or in juvenile court.

The girls told police they stabbed a classmate to please a fictitious character named Slender Man. The victim survived.

Wisconsin changed its juvenile code in the 1990s, lowering the age at which a defendant goes to adult court, from 18 to 17. Former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Janine Geske says attitudes had changed.

Brett Levin / Flickr

Members of a Milwaukee Common Council committee took up a proposal Thursday that could reduce the penalties for first-time offenses for possession of small amounts of marijuana. Advocates say reforms are needed to address disparities in how marijuana laws are enforced and their impact on offenders.

"When you look at the percentage of the population that is African-American versus the percentage of offenders who are actually being picked up by police in Milwaukee and prosecuted, there is a disparity there," says Public Policy Forum president Rob Henken.

United Performing Arts Fund

Every year since 1981, the streets of Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin have been flooded with bicycles for the annual United Performing Arts Fund Ride for the Arts. The routes offer both recreational and avid bike riders a chance to see Milwaukee all while supporting the arts.

Pfister Hotel

Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel is known around the country for a number of good reasons. It’s thought of as the city’s largest historic hotel – a throwback to the grand hotel palaces of a century ago. 

The Pfister also supports its very own narrator – a person who receives a one-year appointment to chronicle and share the stories of the hotel, its guests and employees. The hotel’s latest narrator happens to be an old friend of and occasional Lake Effect contributor.

D Schlabowske

Wisconsin was one of the first states in the country to adopt Complete Streets, a program that factors bicyclists and pedestrians into road projects. Under Gov. Walker’s budget, it would be eliminated.

 The Wisconsin Bike Fed, or WBF, says the move would take the state in the wrong direction.

    

Members of the Milwaukee Police Department on Thursday updated city leaders on the progress of recovering lost interrogation videos. A handful were destroyed when one of the department’s computers crashed in January.

Members of the police department spoke to the Common Council’s Public Safety committee. IT Director Chuck Burke described what happened the day of the computer crash.

“We had two disk drive failures, which was recoverable. In the process of the system recovering those failed drives, a third one failed, making the system inoperable,” Burke says.

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Dozens of faith leaders in Wisconsin are outraged with the Legislature’s Joint Committee on Finance. It decided to increase prison spending in the next state budget by $5 million, in order to add capacity.

Doby Photography / NPR

Audie Cornish has held many positions in public radio. She started as a reporter for WBUR in Boston, then for NPR, covering everything from politics to natural disasters.

H. Raab / Flickr

For the last few months, Lake Effect's astronomy contributor has talked about how the things in the night sky came to be. As the weather warms up, it's time to tell a simpler story.

It’s the time of year that it’s really pretty comfortable to just go out and look up into the night sky.

Lake Effect astronomy contributor, and director of the Mandred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee, Jean Creighton describes some of the constellations in the night sky as May changes over to June:

michaeljung, Fotolia

Fifteen months ago, President Obama launched an initiative aimed at improving the outlook for boys and young men of color in the United States. The My Brother’s Keeper initiative was set up to bring both the public, private and faith-based sectors together to address issues ranging from early childhood education and high school graduation rates to issues surrounding incarceration and employment.

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Gene Cox

What Madison's Tiny House Community for the Homeless Looks Like

The idea to create a tiny house community for homeless people in Madison grew out of the “Occupy” movement.
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