Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

The beginning of a new year has most of us thinking about ways to improve our lives. Whether it’s losing weight, learning something new, getting in shape, or decluttering our homes, January seems to be the time we strive to make things better.

Classical musicians aren’t immune to that impulse. Cellist Robert Cohen chats with us each month in a series we call On That Note, and he’s been thinking about well-being:

Robert Cohen is the cellist for the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet and his On That Note segments are a regular Lake Effect feature.

In the last episode of Radio Chipstone, contributor Gianofer Fields introduced us to a young woman named Ashley Kuehl.

Kuehl inherited two pieces of ruby red, hand blown glass from her grandmother and was curious to learn more about them. She knew that the glass was purchased in the Sixties, maybe in Pennsylvania. In this episode of Radio Chipstone Fields calls on reinforcements to solve the puzzle:

Essay: Stuff a Sock In It

41 minutes ago
durantelallera / Fotolia

If you were an alien on vacation to earth, you’d be forgiven for thinking humans never shut up. We talk all the time: right here on radio and on television, on our smartphones, to each other.

Like most of us, Lake Effect essayist Joanne Weintraub is guilty of talking too much. But she’s trying to cut it out:

Marge Pitrof

Many Milwaukee residents spent the weekend of Donald Trump's inauguration speaking out against his policies. 

Red Arrow Park in downtown Milwaukee was the gathering spot late Friday, as advocacy groups launched what they say will be ongoing protests against Trump administration policies that don't respect the rights of women, immigrants, people of color and others.

Art Montes

This is a weekend that will go down in history. There are heightened emotions across the country, some celebratory and millions of others are taking to the streets to march in solidarity. They will march with women, with immigrants and people of color, with Muslims and the LGBTQ community, for every person at risk of losing their healthcare and so much more.  However you feel about the next four years, becoming an active and informed citizen has never been more important than it is now.

As promised, President Trump got to work on Day One, spending some time in the Oval Office in between the inaugural parade and a trio of formal balls.

Trump signed an executive order Friday night directing government agencies to "ease the burdens" of Obamacare while the new administration and Congress work toward repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus presented Trump with the order, which he described as: "An executive order minimizing the economic burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act pending repeal."

Marti Mikkelson

People were cheering and clinking champagne glasses Friday morning in Waukesha County, as Donald Trump was sworn-in as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with Republicans in Delafield as they watched the inauguration ceremony unfold.

About 25 Trump supporters gathered for a watch party at the Delafield Brewhaus. They let out a holler when the oath of office ended. After the inaugural address, the partygoers helped themselves to a buffet.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Donald Trump has been sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. Below is the transcript of President Trump's inaugural address as well as notes and analysis from NPR reporters and editors.

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A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

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