Trump Chief Of Staff Priebus Is Out — In Biggest White House Staff Shake-Up Yet

Updated at 8 p.m. ET He rose from relative state-party obscurity and reached an unlikely pinnacle as the man responsible for the agenda of the president of the United States. Now, Reince Priebus is out of that job as White House chief of staff in the most significant shake-up of the rocky Trump presidency. President Trump announced on Twitter on Friday that Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has been named to replace Priebus, who says he resigned Thursday. Priebus issued a statement...

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Jessi Paetzke

President Trump on Friday fired his chief of staff, Wisconsin native Reince Priebus and replaced him with Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. Trump made the announcement via Twitter where he also thanked Priebus for his service and dedication to his country. It had been a rough week for Priebus, who had been accused by Trump’s Director of Communications Anthony Scaramucci, of leaking information about him. Rumors had been floating for months that Priebus was on his way out. Before Priebus took the job as chief of staff he ran the Republican National Committee.

Wisconsin Black Historical Society

The summer of 1967 was violent all across the country. Just as in other cities, black residents in Milwaukee tired of unequal treatment and the lack of opportunity hit their breaking point and a riot ensued.

“The creation of deindustrialization was in full bloom. People don’t have jobs. Things got bad. Depression, unemployment and poverty began to blanket the city so it just exploded,” Clayborn Benson says.

He is the executive director of the Wisconsin Black Historical Society.

Updated at 8:25 p.m. ET

North Korea said early Saturday that its intercontinental ballistic missile test on Friday showed its program could hit the United States, according to a statement reported by The Associated Press and Reuters.

The U.S. Department of Defense says the missile, which launched just before midnight local time, traveled roughly 620 miles — from the country's northern province of Jagang to the Sea of Japan, where it finally splashed into the waters off Japan's west coast.

Nicotine will now be at the center of the Food and Drug Administration's effort to regulate tobacco, the agency said, announcing that it will aim to lower the amount of nicotine in cigarettes to a level that will help curb addiction.

It would be the first time in the agency's history that it has sought to regulate the amount of nicotine in cigarettes.

Thomas Wheeler, who has been leading the Justice Department's civil rights unit, informed staffers there Thursday that he would be leaving the post, according to two sources familiar with the communication.

Rachel Morello

Tech manufacturing giant Foxconn continues to make headlines in Wisconsin this week.

Following months of speculation, President Donald Trump confirmed Wednesday that the company will build a plant in Wisconsin over the next few years.  

Updated 9:40 p.m. ET

Stung by new American sanctions, Russia's Foreign Ministry says the U.S. must downsize its diplomatic and technical staff in Moscow and other cities. The ministry is also suspending the U.S. Embassy's use of two sites — a storage facility and a dacha on an island in the Moscow River.

President Trump said Friday night he would sign the sanctions legislation because Congress was responsive to his input on the bill.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Police Chief Edward Flynn said during the first four years of the current pursuit policy both accidents and stolen car incidents steadily declined. He told commissioners at their Thursday evening meeting, he’d like more time to study what turned that decline upside down.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

Janette Braverman is a person with a lot on her plate. She is the first African American to serve on the Ozaukee County Board of Supervisors and has a two-decade career in the IT and manufacturing industries. As if that weren't enough, Braverman also owns her own consulting business and is deeply invested in church life. 

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