Rachel Morello

High School Students Learn By Creating At South Milwaukee 'Fab Lab'

The term project-based learning is a buzzword in education these days. Teachers are constantly looking for ways to make learning more fun and engaging, through hands-on experiences that show students how to apply academic concepts in real-world situations.

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Loozrboy / Flickr

The proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline project and the protests against it got a lot of international media attention for what its backers said it would do, and what opponents feared it would do.

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Although ballet dancers begin training quite young, their professional lives are often short. Most dancers have moved on to another career by the time they’re in their mid-30s. But when you’ve spent hours a day in class and rehearsal since you were a child, it’s hard to imagine yourself doing something else.

Fortunately for the dancers at the Milwaukee Ballet, they have a resource to help them. The Milwaukee Dancers’ Fund, Inc. exists to help dancers transition from being full-time performers into other careers.

nateemee / Fotolia

As the stock markets opened today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was running at just over 19,885.  If things go especially well today, it could very well finish over the 20,000 mark for the first time in history. 

This may seem monumental, but award-winning Washington Post financial columnist and Marketplace Morning Report contributor Allan Sloan says not to get too excited.

The abortion rate in the United States fell to its lowest level since the historic Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalized abortion nationwide, a new report finds.

The report by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion, puts the rate at 14.6 abortions per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15-44) in 2014. That's the lowest recorded rate since the Roe decision in 1973. The abortion rate has been declining for decades — down from a peak of 29.3 in 1980 and 1981.

T. Krueger / WPR

Last week, Milwaukee was one of four cities nationwide that participated in NPR's A Nation Engaged project.  The idea behind the project was to gather together citizens to ask them what they wanted the incoming Presidential administration to know about their towns and cities.

Milwaukee’s event was moderated by NPR’s National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea, who stressed the importance of events that bring reporters into the field, particularly in swing states like Wisconsin. 

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

One of the concerns on many people’s minds is what will happen to the Affordable Care Act. Lake Effect essayist Avi Lank is one of them:

As plans to repeal and replace Obamacare pick up steam, historically minded Republicans are thinking about the bloody shirt - no, not a medical bloody shirt, but a political one. For decades after the Civil War, the Republican Party used "waiving the bloody shirt" as a sure-fire device for winning presidential elections.

WUWM Susan Bence

What do you want President-elect Donald Trump to know about you and your community?

WUWM, WPR and NPR asked that question during its A Nation Engaged community conversation Wednesday evening at The Back Room @ Colectivo Coffee in Milwaukee.

NPR Political Correspondent Don Gonyea moderated a panel and took comments and questions from the audience, with the help of WUWM's Mitch Teich, executive producer of Lake Effect, and WPR's Kyla Calvert Mason.

The panel included:

LaToya Dennis

Want to purchase a home for a dollar?

The City of Milwaukee has you covered, as long as you meet certain conditions. The city wants to spend several million state dollars, to help people rehabilitate homes in the Sherman Park neighborhood. The program stems from the unrest that occurred there this summer, after a police officer fatally shot a man, and residents raised a host of challenges the area faces. The rehab plan is angering some interested individuals, because, of its conditions.

Nate Holton, the man Milwaukee County hired in 2015 to make life better here for struggling African Americans, says he knew when he was young that he wanted to help improve the lives of Milwaukee’s black residents. He says Dr. King was his inspiration.

Marge Pitrof

The Obama administration's Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but it has enabled the United States to take a major step forward in making health insurance available to all Americans, multiple speakers told a crowd Sunday morning, on Milwaukee's south side.

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