Ann Althouse

Wisconsin Lawmakers Extend UW Tuition Freeze

Students in the UW System wouldn’t have to worry about a tuition hike in the next two years, under a spending plan the legislature’s Joint Finance committee approved Thursday. The panel voted along party lines, to continue a freeze that’s been in place the past four years. However, Republicans did not control costs as much as Gov. Walker hoped they would.

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bfatphoto / Flickr

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

On Lake Effect, we’ve looked at various issues surrounding mental health such as trauma, substance abuse, and the need for mental health nursing and other professions to help the Milwaukee community. Many assume mental health concerns are those of grown adults, but one psychologist is encouraging parents, teachers, and caretakers how to look out for a child’s mental health.

zinkevych / Fotolia

The medical system has long separated primary health care and mental health care. And in a city like Milwaukee where there are significant obstacles for people to have good access to healthcare – one aspect of a person’s health often suffers at the expense of the other.

Kathrine Schleicher

Here it is, Memorial Day weekend, the unofficial start of summer in Milwaukee. Some of us will pack the cars and head up north, while others will head to Bradford Beach to christen the volleyball nets, and some will head south to the first “Fest” of the season. On Monday, flags will be flown at half-staff in yards across the nation in memory of those who lost their lives serving their country. So this week, we have two stories: one about getting out of town, and one about getting out alive.

Mitch Teich

At the end of another intense news week, Lake Effect news analyst Charlie Sykes marvels at a fast pace cycle, which doesn't seem to slow down.

"We're living in an era," he says, "in which every day, there's a story - a revelation - that in a different world would have dominated the news for weeks in and of itself.  And yet, these are one news-cycle stories."

On Friday's Lake Effect, Sykes offered his take on several key issues that dominated the news (for a while, anyway) this week:

While Milwaukee may be considered the United States’ most segregated city, our neighbors just south of us aren’t too much better. Chicago is consistently ranked as one of the most segregated cities in the U.S., and much like Milwaukee, its history is rooted in government sanctioned racism.

For decades, racially restrictive covenants forced black Chicagoans to live in a designated area of the city known as the Black Belt. The use of these covenants was struck down by the Supreme Court in the late 1940s, but that wasn't the end of their impact.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Charles Fishman and Seth Siegel know a thing or two about water.

Fishman is author of The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water. Siegel wrote Let There Be Water: Israel’s Solution for a Water-Starved World.

They were among the 200 people interested in water issues who spent two days in Milwaukee this week. The draw was The Water Council’s 10th annual summit at which security was the theme.

Bonnie North

Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel sponsors a unique residency program for area artists. For 12 months, the selected artist sets up shop in a space off the lobby by the elevators on the first floor.

Republic of Korea / Flickr

In South Korea former president and conservative politician, Park Geun-hye, was impeached this year for abuse of power. The process to find Park's replacement culminated in the election of current president, Moon Jae-in of the Democratic Party of Korea. He won in a landslide. Lake Effect essayist, Art Cyr, has been reflecting on the recent election and what it means for the state of democracy. 

On Friday, Hillary Clinton addressed the graduating class of her alma mater, Wellesley College.

She used the opportunity to wade into current politics and direct a few jokes at President Trump.

Jonathan Shoemaker / Aja-Monet/Facebook

It’s hard to encapsulate a person’s life and experiences in printed words. No matter how eloquent the writing, there will always be moments and pieces left to speculation. This was one of Aja Monet’s biggest worries when she first considered publishing her poetry.

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