Republicans Admit Defeat On Health Care Bill: 'Obamacare Is The Law Of The Land'

Updated at 5 p.m. ET House Republicans scrapped a vote on their health care replacement plan on Friday after defections from both the right and center that made it clear the bill would not pass. "Obamacare is the law of the land. It is going to remain the law of the land," House Speaker Paul Ryan admitted shortly after he pulled the bill. "We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future. I don't know how long it's going to take us to replace this law." Ryan may have...

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As we continue our series on youth violence in Milwaukee, we meet with five local teenage girls who’ve had first-hand experience with violence, in their case, fighting. Their names are Maria, Jasmine, Kwan, Denise and Destiny, and they’re either 16 or 17 years old. Four of the five admit being violent toward people they don’t like.

Rounding Out Youth Violence

May 29, 2008

Bruce Murphy is editor of Milwaukee Magazine; Kurt Chandler is a senior editor of the magazine. Ricardo Pimentel is editorial page editor of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. They join Jane Hampden at the end of each month for the Lake Effect Reporter Roundtable. Today the journalists share thoughts about youth violence in Milwaukee.

History of Violence in Milwaukee

May 29, 2008

Milwaukee-born writer and historian John Gurda is a Lake Effect contributor He’s the author of eighteen books including The Making of Milwaukee. He talks with Jane Hampden about the roots of violence in the city.

As part of our series on youth violence, 14 year old Sheldon Fountain, Jr. reads the poem he was inspired to write about a wayward bullet killing a young girl, an innocent bystander. The poem is titled, Generally Speaking, A Reason for Poetry.

Milwaukee officials note that a proliferation of guns and other weapons has accompanied an increase in youth violence here. However, an army of dedicated professionals staff programs designed to reach out to young people whose lives can be turned upside down by the effects of violence.

Starting today, WUWM News and the Lake Effect program are examining the causes of youth violence and possible solutions to what some have called an epidemic afflicting Milwaukee.

WUWM began a new series about youth violence in Milwaukee. We'll be airing stories and interviews on Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Lake Effect that will take an in-depth look at the problem and most importantly, explore possible solutions.

Friday morning, we’ll have a story by WUWM's LaToya Dennis. She spoke with WUWM's Erin Toner.

WUWM has begun a series of reports on youth violence in Milwaukee. That’s in light of the upcoming summer months, which are often a rough time for the city. Friday, we visit what is arguably the most dangerous zip code area for both kids and others. 53206. In 2005 and 2006, 51 homicides were recorded there. That’s more than twice as many as in neighboring areas. A few decades ago, residents say 53206 was thriving. WUWM’s LaToya Dennis explores the changes that have taken place.

Competing Cooks

Apr 25, 2008

Four students from Badger High School in Lake Geneva Wisconsin are slicing and dicing their way through a cooking competition going on in San Diego today. The quartet won at the state level and now are up against 36 other teams from around the country.

The winning team must concoct a three-course gourmet meal in one hour, and not a second longer.

WUWM's Susan Bence meet Badgers culinary program director Russ Tronsen and his Badger High School team as they practiced for the national ProStart Invitational.

A Magnificent Obsession

Apr 22, 2008

Aldo Leopold was a legendary environmentalist and forester. He spent almost two decades working with the U.S. Forest Service in the Southwest. Throughout his life Leopold loved observing, journaling and sketching his surrounding. That didn’t change when he transferred to work in Madison, Wisconsin.

Nina Leopold Bradley was a young girl in 1935, when her father Aldo invited his family on the adventure of a lifetime. A ramshackle farm caught his eye near the Wisconsin River, not far from Baraboo.

Ralph and Terry Kovel are famous names in the world of antiques and collectibles.

Ralph was born in Milwaukee; when his family moved to Ohio, he met Terry Horvitz on a blind date. The couple's career took off in 1953 with the publication of their first "catalog" called Kovels' Dictionary of Marks. Their success lead to a newspaper column, television show and more.

WUWM's Susan Bence met Terry Kovel when she was in town for a home and garden show at State Fair Park.

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