Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

The beginning of a new year has most of us thinking about ways to improve our lives. Whether it’s losing weight, learning something new, getting in shape, or decluttering our homes, January seems to be the time we strive to make things better.

Classical musicians aren’t immune to that impulse. Cellist Robert Cohen chats with us each month in a series we call On That Note, and he’s been thinking about well-being:

Robert Cohen is the cellist for the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet and his On That Note segments are a regular Lake Effect feature.

In the last episode of Radio Chipstone, contributor Gianofer Fields introduced us to a young woman named Ashley Kuehl.

Kuehl inherited two pieces of ruby red, hand blown glass from her grandmother and was curious to learn more about them. She knew that the glass was purchased in the Sixties, maybe in Pennsylvania. In this episode of Radio Chipstone Fields calls on reinforcements to solve the puzzle:

Essay: Stuff a Sock In It

2 hours ago
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If you were an alien on vacation to earth, you’d be forgiven for thinking humans never shut up. We talk all the time: right here on radio and on television, on our smartphones, to each other.

Like most of us, Lake Effect essayist Joanne Weintraub is guilty of talking too much. But she’s trying to cut it out:

President Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Pence and Karen Pence continued a long inaugural tradition Saturday morning, attending a prayer service that was notable for the diversity of faith participants.

To revisit the box office numbers for 1988 is to remember when movies that made a lot of money looked entirely different than they do now. Rain Man grossed more money domestically than anything else that year. It was followed in the top 10 by Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Coming To America, Big, Twins, Crocodile Dundee II, Die Hard, The Naked Gun, Cocktail, and Beetlejuice. Only one sequel in the bunch. That's two adult dramas (if you count Cocktail, which ...

Mercy is a human impulse, but so is murder. In Human Acts, Han Kang's novel of the 1980 Gwangju Uprising and its aftermath, people spill blood, and people brave death to donate it. With a sensitivity so sharp that it's painful, Human Acts sets out to reconcile these paradoxical and coexisting humanities.

Back in 1999, a writer named Daniel Handler decided that kids books were too cheerful. So he adopted the pen name Lemony Snicket, and authored "A Series of Unfortunate Events" — now also a series on Netflix.

We've invited Handler to play a game called "What the hell happened to my Louis Vuitton valise, you monster?" Three questions about baggage handlers.

Art Montes

This is a weekend that will go down in history. There are heightened emotions across the country, some celebratory and millions of others are taking to the streets to march in solidarity. They will march with women, with immigrants and people of color, with Muslims and the LGBTQ community, for every person at risk of losing their healthcare and so much more.  However you feel about the next four years, becoming an active and informed citizen has never been more important than it is now.

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Elliot Ackerman's new novel Dark at the Crossing is about a man who escaped one conflict zone with his life, and now wants to break into a new one.

Haris Abadi — an Iraqi who worked for U.S. special forces during the Iraq War and later became a U.S. citizen — wants to put his new life on the line to free Syria from the cruel grip of Bashar al-Assad.

But Haris is turned back at the Turkish-Syrian border, then robbed, then taken in by Syrian refugees who make him look into his own commitment. Is it to Syria — or, ultimately, his own definition of himself?

At Goats and Soda we're always watching the developing world.

A group of international photographers is doing the same thing — but from a drone's perspective.

We mined the website dronestagram (think Instagram for drone pics) for the most riveting drone photos of the developing world from the past year. Here are a few of the eye-catching images we came across and the stories behind them.

An Island Home

In the Central Valley, there's a bumper sticker you see all over the place. It's shaped like California, and reads "My job depends on Ag." In California, that agriculture depends on immigrant labor.

Many farmers in the state supported President Donald Trump despite his hard-line stance on immigration. So as the new Trump administration takes office, what's the thinking of those involved in the region's biggest industry?

Donald Trump had already emerged as the likely presidential nominee of the Republican Party back in April when he gave a foreign policy speech pledging that "America First" would be "the major and overriding theme of my administration."

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