Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

University of Wisconsin L.R. Ingersoll Physics Museum / www.physics.wisc.edu

For many of us, physics is something that we are required to take in high school. And for many of us, we are sure it’s something we’ll never use it in real life. Well, staff member Steve Narf of the UW Madison Leonard R. Ingersoll Physics Museum says while the formulas and equations may seem daunting, physics is something we all experience.

Ah, the cardigan: your granny's cozy go-to used to be available year-round, but in limited quantities and colors. It was considered the sartorial equivalent of flossing: necessary, but not glamorous.

"The cardigan used to be something to keep you warm in the work place," explains Teri Agins, who covered the fashion industry for the Wall Street Journal for years. "It was not really an accessory you left on—unless you wore it as part of a twin set."

That look, sweater upon sweater, was considered too prim for a lot of young women. It was their mother's look.

We're taping the show in Providence this week, and we can't help but notice — Rhode Island isn't actually an island. So we've invited the state's first female governor, Gina Raimondo, to answer three questions about real islands.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ex Fabula

Tonight, the best and the brightest of Ex Fabula’s Seventh Season come together for an evening of engaging, entertaining, and sometimes, emotional stories at the EX FABULA SEASON SEVEN ALL STARS EVENT at Alverno's Pitman Theater stage with the theme “Game Changer.”

To close out our All Stars Preview we have the Audience Favorite's  from our last two StorySlams of the Season:

On the second floor of an old Bavarian palace in Munich, Germany, there's a library with high ceilings, a distinctly bookish smell and one of the world's most extensive collections of Latin texts. About 20 researchers from all over the world work in small offices around the room.

They're laboring on a comprehensive Latin dictionary that's been in progress since 1894. The most recently published volume contained all the words beginning with the letter P. That was back in 2010.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Not long after publishing his first book, London designer Thomas Thwaites found himself with no real job and in relationship trouble. His book, The Toaster Project — about his attempt to build a toaster from scratch — was a huge success, but he found the whole business of being a celebrity thinker a hard act to follow.

To be human is to worry about getting by, doing better, finding love and accepting the march of mortality. Thwaites decided to try to escape the burden of being human — and he would do it by becoming a goat.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sughra Hussainy makes her own watercolors — which she uses to paint intricate miniatures in the traditional Persian and Afghan styles. Her favorite hue is blue — made from powdered lapis lazuli gemstones.

In a telling 2014 interview, Alejandro Jodorowsky opens up about — among other things — losing his son ("It destroyed me") and the healing power of art. "If I cannot heal my son who died," he says, "I will heal the other son. My goal for art now is to heal." One gets the feeling that, through his many books and films, a vision of healing has always been part of the plan.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Dating is plenty complicated as things stand. But suppose romance came with deadlines, and a penalty for not meeting them. That's the dilemma Colin Farrell faces in filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos' latest weirdness. The maker of Dogtooth, which takes home schooling to comically absurd extremes, and Alps, which does much the same for the process of grieving, is tackling notions of romance in The Lobster, and let's just say that rom-coms don't come much stranger.

Here's a minor philosophical puzzle to ponder this Friday: The "see no evil," "hear no evil" and "speak no evil" monkey emojis.

One monkey, three faces? Or three monkeys, each making a different face?

The writer-director Whit Stillman's Love & Friendship is an improvement on its source, Jane Austen's novella Lady Susan.

That's not quite as heretical as it sounds. Austen wrote the book early in her career, before Pride and Prejudice. It wasn't published in her lifetime. The title isn't even hers — it didn't have one.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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