Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

There is a myth that the most worshipped woman in popular culture is the one perceived as most perfectly beautiful, but that's not so. What's worshipped the most is the one who threads the needle most precisely such that she is almost impossibly beautiful, but something about her brings her toward you and into focus, close enough that you feel like you could touch her.

'I Am No One:' Feels Like Somebody's Watching Me

Jul 7, 2016

Patrick Flanery's new novel I Am No One asks whether it is more delusional to think you are being watched, or to think you are not being watched. Conventionally a mark of mental illness, it has more recently come to mean you're just well informed.

You are not, maybe, being particularly watched, but it is now obvious that a vast and impersonal state apparatus hovers perpetually just outside the boundaries of visibility, waiting to be triggered by that infelicitous internet search, that email from relatives abroad, that unlikely bank transfer.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 KUER-FM. To see more, visit KUER-FM.

Sing Me a Story

Hundreds of thousands of people are going through the turnstiles along the Lake Michigan shore at Summerfest this week, and many of them will see headliner shows at the Marcus Amphitheatre. But these concert-goers most-likely won't notice an unassuming RV parked near the entrance to the amphitheatre.

Hugues Argence

Often, our On That Note segment recordings take place with Bonnie North in the Lake Effect studio, and cellist Robert Cohen in some far-flung place where he is performing, either on his own or as part of the Fine Arts Quartet.

However for this edition, Cohen came by the studio with his cello to not only perform some Bach pieces, but talk about their unique qualities.

Fresh Air producer John Sheehan discusses The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified, a new adventure podcast for kids featuring an intrepid radio reporter who foils plots and outwits crafty villains.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

For 12 years, Chester, Pa., had no supermarket. In an effort to end this so-called food desert, a local food bank plunked down a nonprofit grocery store in the impoverished Delaware County city in October 2013.

Area food bank Philabundance opened the new store, called Fare & Square, in the same footprint as a former supermarket at the corner of Trainer and 9th streets.

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

Restaurant critic Ann Christenson eats out a lot. That's her job, afterall. And for the cover story of this month's Milwaukee Magazine, she has pulled together some of the most noteworthy, new places to eat in the Milwaukee area. 

Her name is Riri Williams. She reverse-engineered her own version of the Iron Man battlesuit in her MIT dorm room, got kicked out, and struck out on her own to do the superhero thing. Clumsily at first, but she's learning fast. So fast she's impressing Tony Stark, who's questioning his status as the Marvel Universe's go-to, super-powered Campbell's soup can. Readers first met her in the March issue of Invincible Iron Man.

Flags in New York City began flying at half-staff Monday, in honor of Roscoe C. Brown. He died Saturday at age 94 and was one of the last few "Red Tail" pilots, a subset of the Tuskegee Airmen. The Airmen were part of a grand experiment in racial integration that the Army reluctantly undertook.

'Faith' Makes Fat A Force To Reckon With

Jul 6, 2016

It's got to be said: The costume is ... not great. Faith, the plus-sized superhero starring in her debut volume from Valiant Comics, is a "psiot" who fights crime armed with the powers of flight and telekinesis. Unfortunately, she does it wearing a sort of half-coat, half-smock in the toothpastey palette of white with blue trim. Her matching white pants and plain white boots evoke a snowsuit. Faith's costume is so graceless, it almost seems like the work of an artist who's channeling unspoken fatophobia.

There aren't many lucky people in the fictional Jamaican town of River Bank, the setting for Nicole Dennis-Benn's debut novel Here Comes the Sun. A long drought has robbed many residents of their livelihoods, and their homes are being threatened by developers who want to build yet another huge resort, one where rich, white tourists can sequester themselves away from the reality of the poverty-stricken villages that surround it.

If you were a Soviet spy, chances are you knew your way around the menu at the restaurant Aragvi, in Moscow. That's where Stalin's security chief held court, and where KGB spooks met for power lunches. Movie stars ate there, too, as did cosmonauts. It was the place to be seen for Moscow's elite.

After the Soviet Union collapsed, Aragvi shut down. It stayed shuttered for many years. But it's just reopened.

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