Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

Advisory: The above video contains language some may find offensive.

All too often, Southern-bred MCs get squeezed into a stereotypical box to reach the masses. Not so with Pell, the Mississippi-by-way-of-New-Orleans artist whose sound is as eclectic as his look.

Benjamin Zander: How Does Music Transform Us?

Nov 10, 2017

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode How Art Changes Us.

About Benjamin Zander's TED Talk

Years of conducting a world-famous orchestra have shown Benjamin Zander the power of classical music. He says music speaks to our emotions — and has the ability to reach everybody.

About Benjamin Zander

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode How Art Changes Us.

About eL Seed's TED Talk

Using Arabic calligraphy, eL Seed paints messages of hope on the sides of buildings. He says the beauty of Arabic script — even if you can't read it — can change negative perceptions of Arab culture.

About eL Seed

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode How Art Changes Us.

About Magda Sayeg's TED Talk

From door handles to double-decker buses, Magda Sayeg "yarn bombs" inanimate objects by wrapping them in handmade knitting. She wants her bright, fuzzy artwork to make the world a little friendlier.

About Magda Sayeg

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode How Art Changes Us.

About Titus Kaphar's TED Talk

Western art contains countless paintings and sculptures that reveal a painful history of racism. We can't erase that history, but artist Titus Kaphar has begun the long and hard work of amending it.

About Titus Kaphar

Here's something that may surprise you: Thanksgiving is just around the corner.

I know what you're thinking: Where did 2017 go? Wasn't it just Labor Day?

I know. I know!

But there's no turning back. Thanksgiving is nearly upon us and there's nothing we can do about it. The question is, are you prepared? Do you have your plans nailed down? Do you know if you are hosting family or friends? Have you figured out what you're cooking, if anything?

His Electro Blue Voice is as meditative as it is menacing, the Italian noise-rock band's collection of high-strung scrapes and howls driven by motorik percussion. Mental Hoop, its second record following Ruthless Sperm and a series of EPs, draws back on the pleasantries and dives headfirst into the nastier end of the band's sound.

We're scattered to the winds this week, so we thought we'd dig one of our favorite episodes from last year out of the vault — the one in which we took a first look at two then-new broadcast television shows that continue to impress: This is Us on NBC, and Speechless on ABC.

If you close your eyes and listen to Joe Ide, you might think you were talking to a black man, a brother who knows his way around the neighborhood. The slang, the inflection. It's all there.

But Joe Ide is 100% Japanese-American.

And he has a simple explanation for why he sounds the way he sounds:

"Most of our friends [growing up] were black," he says.

A Colorful South LA Childhood

Ide (pronounced "EEE-day") grew up in South Los Angeles, with his extended family.

Ivy Pochoda begins her new novel almost like she's trying to break up the ho-hum of an everyday morning: In the middle of downtown traffic, there's a man jogging, without a care, through Los Angeles' crazy maze of freeways. And, oh yeah, he's totally naked. "He's just completely antithetical to everything that I imagine a morning commuter is up against," Pochoda says. "He's free, he's bucking the rules, and he's moving."

Pochoda's novel is called Wonder Valley, and it follows several different characters who all connect back to that mystery man on the freeway.

ABC's Grey's Anatomy might be the best show on television that TV critics rarely talk about.

For Laura Burhenn, 2016 was a tough year and she wasn't alone. We lost David Bowie, Leonard Cohen, Prince (and so many more beloved artists).

The pastor of the Texas church that was the site of a deadly shooting rampage this week says the bullet-riddled structure will be demolished because it is too stark of a reminder of the massacre.

Pastor Frank Pomeroy, whose 14-year-old daughter, Annabelle, was among the victims, told the Southern Baptist Convention on Thursday that he plans to have the church razed.

"There's too many that do not want to go back in there," Pomeroy told The Wall Street Journal.

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET on Friday

Louis C.K. masturbated in front of multiple female colleagues, to their shock and dismay, according to women who spoke on the record to The New York Times about their experiences.

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