Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

Goodreads.com photo

  Many people who live in the city or suburbs have had the somewhat romantic notion of giving up the rat race and buying a place in the country... maybe getting some chickens, growing some of your own food. It's tempting, especially after you've sat in rush hour traffic for a while. But what does it really take to make that pipe dream a viable option?

Michael McDermott Performs at WUWM

Nov 6, 2012
Bruce Winter

Michael McDermott stopped by the radio station today to talk about his new family and his unique music. He plays two songs, Hit Me Back and Deal With the Devil, discussing his new album Hit Me Back. McDermott describes his music as an effort to break away from the typical formulaic pop-songs of today and used names like Sarah Mclachlan to inspire him while recording Hit Me Back.

Band Website: http://www.michael-mcdermott.com/

Clara Barton: More Than the Red Cross

Nov 5, 2012
Wiki Commons photo

It's hard to place enough significance on how the American Civil War would go on to shape our country and its people - or to overestimate the extreme loss of life it caused.

Beyond the battlefields, however, the War Between the states also brought forth many firsts, such as the first Army ambulance corps, the first use of conscription of soldiers, the first black U.S. Army officer - the list goes on and on.

She Who Is Not to Be Named

 If you don't carve your pumpkins, someone will. 

Throughout the fall of 1862, Wisconsin soldiers were making a name for themselves for their ferocious fighting in several major battles - most notably the Black Hats of the West gained their better known moninker The Iron Brigade after an epic battle at Sout Mountain 150 years ago last month.

A few weeks ago, we told you about Marquette University's unique take on commemorating the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. The university's year-long "Freedom Project" will take a cross-disciplinary approach to examining the multiple and complex definitions of freedom, in the past and today. As part of the broader Freedom Project, the Haggerty Museum of Art has designed three exhibitions centered on this general theme of freedom.

Gianofer Fields

As a student of material culture, Lake Effect contributor Gianofer Fields examines the meanings behind objects - what they signify historically and to an individual. But what happens when the meaning of a treasured object is hidden and lost to time?

image courtesy of the author

The page of the country's newspapers can sometimes be rough - stories of crime and mayhem, contentious politics, and - depending your rooting interests - losing sports teams.  But fortunately, there are always the comics to fall back on, some literal comic relief in the midst of everything else.

Iron Brigade and Beyond: In the Wake of Antietam

Oct 12, 2012

With election season in full swing, it's easy to think that today's political environment is more polarized than in the past - that back in the old days, consensus was the norm, politicians didn't calculate with precision their next moves, and war wasn't politicized.

Of course, one has to merely rewind about 150 years to the American Civil War to rejigger that assumption.

Keegan Wenzler

The Delta Routine came to play their songs I Wait Alone and New York Avenue today and to talk music, business, and art with Bruce Winter. The band and Bruce cover the fun of recording gritty music in even grittier places and the challenges of promoting the final product.

Band Website: http://www.thedeltaroutine.com

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Art Museum

Knick-knacks, tchochkis, collectibles...whatever you want to call them, there are objects we love to collect.

Barbara Cook

Barbara Cook is perhaps best known for her Broadway roles: she was the original Marian the Librarian in The Music Man, Cunegonde in Candide, and Amalia in She Loves Me. And her cabaret and concert interpretations of Stephen Sondheim's songs have no peer. But now, nearing the age of 85, the legendary singer and Kennedy Center honoree has taken a far jazzier approach.

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Mike Mangione stopped by the studio today to catch up with Bruce Winter and to share some of his original "sonic bumper bowling" music.  Bruce and Mike discuss and listen to the songs Fields of Evermore and Red-Winged Black Bird Man.  Mike reflects on his major influences and how he tries to position himself and his music in the minds of his fans.

Band Website: http://www.mikemangione.com

Remembering the Initial Emancipation Proclamation

Sep 28, 2012
Courtesy of LOC

"That...all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free..." We know those words: they're from the opening lines of the Emancipation Proclamation, which upon being issued by President Abraham Lincoln, went into effect January 1, 1863.

Most of the commemorations in this second year of the Civil War sesquicentennial revolve around analyzing the military history of the conflict. But Marquette University wanted to mark the anniversary by presenting another angle: the meaning of freedom.

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