Arts & Culture

Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Smart Spin On Alternate History In 'The Revolutions'

In his previous novels, Felix Gilman presented fantastic, mind-expanding visions of other worlds. His fifth, The Revolutions, sticks a little closer to home — at least at first. For a change, he's set a book in the real world, albeit a skewed version of it. Gilman reimagines late-19th-century London as a dark and dangerous place; along with all the political, technological, and cultural upheavals of the age, he's added an insidious dimension to the fashionable occultism that gripped the end of the Victorian Era.

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All Songs Considered
6:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

The Sole Of A Band, April 3

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:32 am

Baggy pants make different music than skinny jeans. Cowboy hats sound different than fedoras. T-shirt-and-jeans bands make a different noise than suit-and-tie bands. You can often look at a band's clothing and have a pretty good idea what it'll sound like.

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Author Interviews
2:36 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Song Of Frogs, Motherhood And Murder In Swampy San Francisco

Emma Donoghue's previous novel was Room.
Andrew Bainbridge

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:53 am

In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876.

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Education
7:47 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Some States Seek To Bless Prayer In Public Schools

High school football players in Suitland, Md., pray with their coach Ed Shields (top right) before a game in 2013.
John McDonnell The Washington Post/Getty Images

Religious groups have been testing the limits on prayer in public school for decades. Now they think they've come up with a new strategy that will allow students to pray wherever and whenever they want.

Bills have been moving in a number of states that would allow students to engage in prayer at school functions such as graduation.

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The Salt
5:24 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Stop, Thief! When Colleagues Steal From The Office Fridge

"Too darn funny what a co-worker put on top of her lunch. It was fake of course, but got the point across."
Courtesy of Toni Kinnard

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

As a wedding planner, Jeanne Hamilton saw her share of very bad manners — people who made her think, "There should be an etiquette hell for people like you."

And bingo! That was the beginning of her website, Etiquette Hell, a repository of more than 6,000 firsthand accounts of bad behavior people witness in their fellow peers.

And the most frequent complaint? Fridge theft. It's rampant, apparently, in offices all over the world.

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Mountain Stage
3:37 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Sam Baker On Mountain Stage

Sam Baker.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 3:41 pm

Singer-songwriter Sam Baker makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, live from the Culture Center Theater in Charleston W.Va.

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Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

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The Picture Show
3:08 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Scenes And Sorrows: A Portrait Of Weeping Mary

Courtesy of O. Rufus Lovett

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

Texas is full of memorable town names — Blanket, Stagecoach, Domino and Paint Rock, to list just a few. Each has at least one tale behind it, and All Things Considered host Melissa Block has been telling some of them as part of the series Deep In the Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas.

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NPR News Investigations
3:08 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Onscreen But Out Of Sight, TV Preachers Avoid Tax Scrutiny

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel in Washington.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block, coming to you this week from member station KERA in Dallas.

This week, we're bringing you two special reports that delve into the hidden finances of televangelists. Yesterday, we featured an investigation into Daystar Television, headquartered in Dallas-Fort Worth. Daystar describes itself as the fastest growing Christian TV network in the world. The IRS classifies it as a church.

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Favorite Sessions
2:56 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

KCRW Presents: Jessy Lanza

Jessy Lanza performing live in the KCRW studios.
Rob LaFond Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:14 pm

Canadian artist Jessy Lanza grew up playing piano and studying jazz, and she only started exploring electronic music five years ago. She performed as a one-woman band during her Morning Becomes Eclectic debut on KCRW, with club-ready songs like "Keep Moving."

Find KCRW's entire session with Jessy Lanza on KCRW.com

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