Arts & Culture

Environment
4:34 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

The Earth's 'Sixth Extinction' May Be One Of Our Own Making

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:15 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Read more
Cabin Fever Playlist
4:34 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

A Little Love And Lots Of Music To Break Your Cabin Fever

Galina Barskaya iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 7:00 pm

Read more
Music News
4:34 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Singing To The Strength Of New Orleans

Alynda Lee Segarra is the lead singer and songwriter of the New Orleans folk ensemble Hurray for the Riff Raff.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 7:00 pm

Beneath the benevolent gaze of a statue of Saint Roch, the patron saint of dogs, invalids and bachelors, Alynda Lee Segarra sings: "People are dying. No one understands."

Read more
Code Switch
4:09 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

George Washington Carver, The Black History Monthiest Of Them All

The George Washington Carver National Monument in Diamond, Mo., was the first dedicated to a nonpresident.
John S. Stewart AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 9:43 am

Peanuts.

He did something, probably a lot of somethings, with peanuts.

That's basically the response I got when I asked people — my friends, folks on Twitter — what they knew about about George Washington Carver.

The details were hazy, but folks remembered that Carver was really important.

Oh, and something about Tuskegee! Wait, did he invent the peanut?

They half-remembered writing book reports about him in elementary school. And then a lot of them sheepishly acknowledged their ignorance.

Read more
The Salt
2:55 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

After 23 Years, Your Waiter Is Ready For A Raise

A Denny's waitress delivers breakfast to customers in Emeryville, Calif. The tipped minimum wage has been stuck at $2.13 since 1991.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 3:21 pm

When Woody Harrelson's character got hired as a bartender on Cheers, he was so excited, he insisted on working for no more than the minimum wage. "I'd work like a slave," he said, "and, of course, I'd wash your car."

Most bar and restaurant workers would prefer to bring home a little more cash. They may be in luck.

As part of his plan to raise the minimum wage, President Obama has called for substantially increasing the base wage paid to tipped workers for the first time in decades.

Read more
World Cafe
2:50 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Temples On World Cafe

Temples.
James Loveday Courtesy of the artist

The English band Temples hails from the small town of Kettering, where its psychedelic music came together in the home studio of singer-guitarist James Edward Bagshaw in 2012. In that small space, the group made the big-sounding Shelter Song, which got the young band noticed; a recording contract soon followed. The album Sun Structures was recorded in much the same fashion.

Read more
Music Reviews
2:43 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

In Session: Frank Wess' 'Magic 201' Offers One Last Lesson

Frank Wess.
Hiroyuki Ito Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 11:35 am

Frank Wess' new album, Magic 201, is a sequel to last year's similar helping of ballads and midtempo strollers, Magic 101. The new album is very nearly every bit as good, and made a little more poignant by Wess' death just before Halloween. On his last session as a leader in 2011, he was still sounding strong at 89.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:41 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Practicing 'Extreme Medicine,' From Deep Sea To Outer Space

Most of us have never been submerged under more than a few feet underwater. But just a few meters down, the water compresses the tissues of your body so that you become more dense. At that point, "You're more likely to sink than float," says Dr. Kevin Fong.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 11:39 am

Dr. Kevin Fong works on "the edges" of medicine — researching how humans survive extremes of heat, cold, trauma, outer space and deep sea. "We're still exploring the human body and what medicine can do in the same way that the great explorers of the 20th century and every age before them explored the world," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

In his book Extreme Medicine, Fong describes how avant garde medicine is challenging our understanding of how our bodies work and the boundary between life and death.

Read more
All Songs Considered
11:51 am
Tue February 11, 2014

The Worst Songs Of All Time?

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 8:57 pm

Read more
Arts & Culture
11:22 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Exclusive Audio: A Conversation with Author Sue Monk Kidd

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Credit Penguin Group

Sue Monk Kidd’s latest book,  The Invention of Wings, is a novel, but it’s based on the very real lives of sisters Sarah and Angelina Grimké, abolitionists and suffragists in the first half of the 19th Century. Their story is little told outside of academic circle, but Kidd would argue that it’s just as important, and just as interesting.

Read more

Pages