Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

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There's a perception these days (not entirely unfounded) that country music rewards its male performers for following a particular formula. The combination of gleaming, rhythmic Top 40 hooks, flirtatious frat-party swagger and small-town backdrops has served as a pattern in the industry, largely because it works., and artists who helped lay out the template, like Luke Bryan and Sam Hunt, have contributed mightily to the growth of country's millennial fanbase.

It was not uncommon, in the mid-20th century, for black American artists and writers to take up more-or-less permanent residence in Europe. Jazz musicians like Bud Powell and Dexter Gordon spent years living in Paris and Copenhagen, enticed by the artistic respect and comparative lack of racial discrimination they found while touring the Continent.

Most musicians who achieve a certain amount of acclaim only to disappear from the public eye get cast as reclusive. The baggage that label carries has never quite fit Cody ChesnuTT. Even if you tried to pin it on him, he'd no doubt shake himself free. In between the release of his sprawling 2002 lo-fi debut, The Headphone Masterpiece, and the 2012 studio follow-up, Landing On A Hundred, the soul conjurer's mystique only grew.

There's a rich body of evidence that links chocolate to heart health.

Now comes a new study that finds people who consume small amounts of chocolate each week have a lower risk of developing atrial fibrillation, a heart condition characterized by a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

When President Trump's budget director, Mick Mulvaney, unveiled the administration's budget blueprint earlier this week, which calls for significant cuts to food stamps, he noted that the aim of the budget was to get people working.

"If you're on food stamps and you're able-bodied, we need you to go to work. If you're on disability insurance and you're not supposed to be — if you're not truly disabled, we need you to go back to work," Mulvaney said Tuesday.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now we're going to have the time of our lives.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "DIRTY DANCING")

COLT PRATTES: (As Johnny Castle) What's your name?

ABIGAIL BRESLIN: (As Baby Houseman) Baby.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Oh, yes. Get out.

Let's look at some of the buzziest shows on television in the past year or so, shall we? What do House of Cards, Girls, I Love Dick, Orphan Black, Transparent and The Magicians have in common?

Every one of them has featured unconventional romantic or sexual relationships involving more than two people.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Two powerful men with vastly different styles and many disagreements met today at the Vatican. And at least one of them is raving about the experience. President Trump told reporters his meeting with Pope Francis was great.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Mac DeMarco On World Cafe

May 24, 2017

Mac DeMarco is just turning 27, but his new album, This Old Dog, seems to represent a more mature persona than he's projected in the past. Originally from Edmonton, Alberta, DeMarco has always been known for bringing the party — and then taking it over the top. But when his father (with whom he's had a difficult relationship for most of his life) became ill, DeMarco wrote the more sober "My Old Man" for him, thinking he was not going to recover.

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Two thieves. Thirteen pieces of art. Twenty-seven years of mystery.

And now, a $10 million reward — for anyone who can bring those missing masterpieces back to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

Two men disguised as police officers made off with the paintings and sketches in 1990. It is still the largest property crime ever carried out in America, and the biggest heist from an art museum anywhere in the world.

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