Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

Rodents are generally the last things most restaurant owners want in their kitchen.

But in the larger cities of Peru, chefs are practically fighting over guinea pigs in a restaurant craze that is bringing financial stability — if not exactly wealth — to small farmers in the Andes Mountains.

In 2014, 12-year-old Tamir Rice was shot and killed by police in a Cleveland park. Since then, Cleveland has joined a list of several cities that have gained national attention following the killings of young black men, many unarmed, by police.

Those killings, the rise of movements like Black Lives Matter and the Alt-Right, and the current election cycle have brought attention to the racial divides that many believe still exist in this country. What can be done to help improve racial tensions?

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

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Rohulamin Quander's ancestors were slaves.

However, unlike a majority of the enslaved population, Sucky Bay and Nancy Carter Quander served George and Martha Washington, the first First Family, and worked on their Mount Vernon farms.

Now, hundreds of years after they worked as spinners on the estate's River Farm, Sucky Bay, Carter Quander and the rest of the 317 slaves who inhabited Mount Vernon are receiving the recognition they deserve.

One late December day in 1950, Max Beckmann was standing on a street corner near Central Park in New York City. The German expressionist painter had been on his way to see an exhibition featuring his work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Called "American Painting Today," the show was displaying his Self-Portrait in Blue Jacket.

It would turn out to be his last self-portrait.

"Do you know how many words there are in 80 minutes?" asks actress Kathleen Turner. "My god!"

Turner is referring to The Year of Magical Thinking, a play based on Joan Didion's 2005 memoir. The book was written while Didion's daughter was in a deep coma, and after her husband of 40 years suffered a fatal heart attack. In her role as Didion, Turner is the only one on stage. "It's very lonely," she says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


"No man is an island, entire of itself," John Donne famously reassured us in 1623, the same year Shakespeare's The Tempest was published in the First Folio. But "isolate" and "island" come from the same Latin root, and the truth is that we make our own islands where we daily maroon ourselves.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


The restaurant inside the National Museum of African-American History and Culture offers food that satisfies your hunger and a space that satisfies your mind. NPR's Wilma Consul gives us a taste of what's cooking inside Sweet Home Cafe.

Ex Fabula: Hidden

Oct 15, 2016
Art Montes

Is there a monster Hidden under your bed? Or living in your head? Have you found a hidden treasure in your grandmother’s old boxes? Perhaps you’ve kept a hidden secret that’s dying to be told. We’ve just the place for you to share these and many other stories. On October 18th we take the Ex Fabula stage to an exciting new venue, The Milwaukee Public Museum.

About one-third of all the food produced globally is either lost or wasted. Pests and infections destroy fruits and vegetables. Grains often rot in storage or during transport. And then there's food in consumers' kitchens and refrigerators that doesn't get eaten, and eventually discarded.

Such losses amount to more than $900 billion globally, according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization.