Arts & Culture

The Record
11:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

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Mountain Stage
5:35 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Vienna Teng On Mountain Stage

Vienna Teng performs live on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 9:28 am

Vienna Teng makes her second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, WV. Teng made her first visit to the show as her career was just beginning to take off – she had left her job as a software engineer to promote her album, and within months was featured on David Letterman, CNN, and NPR's Weekend Edition. This lead to tours with Patty Griffin, Shawn Colvin and Joan Osborn.

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Author Interviews
5:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

In 'Dallas 1963,' A City Of Rage, Seized By 'Civic Hysteria'

Dallas 1963, by Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis

Nearly half a century later, the date remains difficult for many to forget: Nov. 22, 1963, the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated. In grainy photographs and countless conspiracy theories, the day endures in our collective memory. What often gets submerged in these images and reports, though, is the story of the place that hosted Kennedy on that day, the city that saw his death firsthand: Dallas.

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What Comes Next? Conversations On The Afterlife
4:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

A Philosopher's 'Afterlife': We May Die, But Others Live On

iStockphoto.com

Philosopher Samuel Scheffler doesn't believe in a traditional afterlife — that is, he doesn't think that a spirit or soul survives the body's physical death. But he does believe in another kind of afterlife: Regardless of what we think about our own life after death, Scheffler tells NPR's Robert Siegel, we all trust that others will continue to live after us. And, much like faith in a spiritual afterlife, that belief changes what we choose to do with our days on earth.

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The Checkout: Live
4:32 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Melissa Aldana Crash Trio: Live At Berklee

Melissa Aldana performs with her Crash Trio, including bassist Pablo Menares.
Kelly Davidson Courtesy of Berklee College Of Music

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:02 am

The saxophonist Melissa Aldana, 24, came to the U.S. from Chile with little money and less command of English. But she did have some serious ability at the saxophone — her father is a saxophonist too — and thanks in part to a Berklee College of Music scholarship, has begun to carve out a career in the music. Since moving to New York, Aldana has already cut two albums for Inner Circle Music, the label founded by saxophonist Greg Osby, one of her mentors. And in winning the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition last month, she was given funds to record her next album.

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The Salt
3:13 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Fish For Dinner? Here Are A Few Tips For Sea Life Lovers

A fishmonger tosses a just-purchased fresh salmon to a colleague behind the counter at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:00 pm

If sustainability is a top priority when you're shopping at the fish counter, wild-caught seafood can be fraught with ethical complications.

One major reason why: bycatch, or the untargeted marine life captured accidentally by fishermen and, often, discarded dead in heaps. It's one of the most problematic aspects of industrial fishing.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:28 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

What Is Classical Music's Women Problem?

Australian conductor Simone Young, the outgoing artistic director of the Hamburg State Opera.
Klaus Lefebvre Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:36 am

Close your eyes, and you may think that this is 1913. In the past few days, the classical music community has been set aflame by recent comments from three prominent male conductors who are — steel yourself — actually saying that women are not capable of standing on the podium.

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The Salt
1:02 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Sweet. Tart. Crunchy: How To Engineer A Better Apple

The just-released Riverbelle is one of well over 100 new apple varieties to hit markets around the world in the past six years.
Courtesy of Honeybear Brands

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:04 pm

Browsing farmers markets this fall, you may find some new apple varieties mixed in with the Granny Smiths, McIntoshes and Fujis. Susan Brown, head of the apple breeding program at Cornell University, estimates that there have been 130 new apples released around the world in the past six years.

This summer, she contributed two more to that tally: the SnapDragon and the Ruby Frost.

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The Salt
1:01 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Meet Dave, A 19-Year-Old Craft Beer With A $2,000 Price Tag

Hair of the Dog releases a few bottles of Dave a year. In September, the 12 bottles of Dave on sale for $2,000 apiece sold out within a few hours.
Courtesy of Alan Sprints

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:00 pm

Hair of the Dog Brewery in Portland, Ore., makes a beer so rare, and so sought after, that it can fetch $2,000 a bottle.

It's called Dave. And no, it's not something out of a Portlandia sketch.

Dave is a barleywine — a strong, dark beer with 29 percent alcohol content. It's been aged for 19 years, first in oak barrels and then glass bottles.

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Live in Concert
12:57 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Pusha T, Live In Concert

Pusha T performs live at NPR Music's showcase at Le Poisson Rouge in New York City on Wednesday, Oct. 16.
Loren Wohl for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:51 am

Pusha T's set was the culmination of a gradual separation from his brother, No Malice, with whom he performed as Clipse until three years ago. The Virginia native made his name as a writer of sharply observed scenes of the drug trade and a connoisseur of unsettling, emotionally raw production.

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