Arts & Culture

The Salt
11:37 am
Wed September 4, 2013

A Greener Way To Cool Your Foods On The Way To The Grocery Store

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:13 pm

Your produce and frozen foods could soon arrive at grocery stores in trucks that release fewer emissions. Researchers are developing a clean technology to keep your food cool while it travels.

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Field Recordings
11:18 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Anna Von Hausswolff Finds A Pipe Organ In New York City

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:14 am

One of my most surprising discoveries of 2013 is an artfully poppy pipe-organ record called Ceremony, by Swedish singer Anna von Hausswolff. Though she doesn't consider herself an accomplished pipe organist, von Hausswolff quickly learned the instrument's power, as well as some of its subtleties.

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Author Interviews
10:58 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Star Interior Designer Redefines Beauty After Hair Loss

Laura Resen

Sheila Bridges seemed to have it all. She became a superstar interior designer after graduating from Brown University and Parsons. Her clients ranged from entertainers to doctors, lawyers, even a former President. And her talents brought her magazine spreads, a store in upstate New York, and a television show. But after all those years of helping other people beautify their homes and offices, she had to learn to find beauty within herself.

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Music
10:58 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Emeli Sande: 'It's Always The Lyric That Gets Me'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Not that hair is the only thing we care about, but now we're going to hear from a singer whose signature blonde platinum coif is one of the things that makes her stand out. We're talking about singer-songwriter Emeli Sande. She had the best-selling album in Britain in 2012.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:49 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Aren't Composers Writing More Symphonies Today?

Composer and clarinetist Derek Bermel.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:34 am

At 8 years old, I scrawled my first and last Symphonies — nos. 1, 2, and 3 — on ruled notebook paper. They were short duets for clarinet and trumpet for myself and my brother to play. Why did I call them symphonies? I can't remember, but I suspect that it was a desire to tie these efforts — and me, by extension — to a grand and venerable tradition.

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All Tech Considered
6:48 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Tailgaters Rejoice! This Cooler Keeps Beers Cold Without Ice

The Case Coolie weighs 1.5 pounds and promises to keep beverages cold for 10 hours.
Courtesy of Case Coolie

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:47 am

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form. That's how we found this week's pick!

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Tiny Desk Concerts
6:41 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Baths: Tiny Desk Concert

Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 10:50 am

Baths, a.k.a. Will Wiesenfeld, plays mysterious and textured electronic music. When Wiesenfeld came to the Tiny Desk, I expected contemplative tones and a laid-back performance; he does, after all, call his project Baths. But what sets him apart from the vast majority of like-minded performers is that his music doesn't get buried behind the buttons or lost in a hypnotic glaze.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Book News: Malala, Girl Shot By Taliban, Calls Books 'Weapons That Defeat Terrorism'

Malala Yousafzai, shown here in March 2012, was shot in the head by the Taliban for supporting education rights for girls.
T. Mughal EPA/Landov

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
6:03 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Sept. 2-8: An 'Idiot' Heart, A Fringe History And 'The End Of Men'

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 12:59 pm

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed September 4, 2013

A Dying Man's Memory-Laden Search For Revenge In 'The Return'

Michael Gruber began his fiction career as a ghostwriter for a well-known American judge. A former federal civil servant, chef, environmentalist, and speechwriter, Gruber had a varied career before he took up writing his own novels, and it shows in his work, in the broad and capacious subject matter and cast of thousands.

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