Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

It's Alive!

Apr 21, 2016

In this game, every answer sounds like the word "alive" said in the voice of Dr. Frankenstein. For example, "What actor delivered the line this game is based on?" You'd answer, "It's Colin Clive!"

Heard on Leslie Odom Jr.: Aaron Burr, Sir

This, That, Or The Other

Apr 21, 2016

In honor of Hamilton, an American hip-hop musical, this episode's categories are: the real names of famous rappers; delegates to the first 1774 Continental Congress; OR 1980s fictional teen villains. Can you tell the difference?

Heard on Leslie Odom Jr.: Aaron Burr, Sir

Celebrity Cross-Breeds

Apr 21, 2016

In this game we imagine what would happen if two famous people became close friends...and did that thing that all close friends do: combine their names. We're looking at you, Paul Ryan Gosling.

Heard on Leslie Odom Jr.: Aaron Burr, Sir

Leslie Odom Jr.: Aaron Burr, Sir

Apr 21, 2016

Every night, Leslie Odom Jr. kills Lin-Manuel Miranda. To be precise, Odom plays Aaron Burr opposite Miranda's Alexander Hamilton in the Broadway musical Hamilton. The Pulitzer Prize-winning musical has become a phenomenon by using hip-hop and a racially diverse cast of black and Hispanic actors to tell the story of the early Republic. And night after night, Odom laments the infamous duel between Burr and Hamilton. "I really do feel bad about killing him every night, I really do," he tells Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg at The Bell House in Brooklyn, NY.

In this Ask Me Another bonus, Leslie Odom Jr. from the Broadway musical Hamilton and guitarist Robin Macatangay perform a cover of Duncan Sheik's "The Guilty Ones" from Odom's self-titled debut album.

From Leslie Odom Jr.: Shake It Up

Poem: Para Jodi en Kansas City

Apr 21, 2016
timonko / Fotolia

To continue our celebration of National Poetry Month, Milwaukee poet Carmen Alicia Murguia recalls a special trip to Kansas City:


Britain's Queen Elizabeth II turns 90 this week, and like many of us do on our birthdays, she'll be celebrating with some cake.

This year the task of coming up with a cake fit for a queen fell to Nadiya Hussain, the winner of the most recent season of the wildly popular TV show The Great British Bake Off.

No impurities, no chemicals, no artificial colors, no electricity, no gas, no phone and ... no clothes?

That's the premise of a pop-up restaurant, called The Bunyadi, that's scheduled to open in central London in June.

"We believe people should get the chance to enjoy and experience a night out without any impurities ... and even no clothes if they wish to," said restaurant founder Seb Lyall in a press release.

And, apparently, many people do so wish.

Earlier this month, Khairuldeen Makhzoomi, who came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and is currently a student at the University of California, Berkeley, was removed from a Southwest Airlines flight because another passenger overheard him speaking on his cellphone in Arabic.

Editor's note: This week, to mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death, we will be running a series of stories examining the links between food and the Bard.

For more than 400 years, Shakespeare's audiences have devoured tales of Twelfth Night's "cakes and ale" and Hamlet's "funeral baked meats."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Here's the thing about Richard Kadrey: He's a lightweight.

And I don't mean this in a bad way. I mean this, in fact, in the best possible way. He's an easy read. His characters have wit and style. His books are a romp — irreverent (quite literally), madcap and buoyant — and they go down like cold lager on a hot afternoon.

Marcus Center/Patrick Dewane

The Accidental Hero is a one-man show detailing the true story of an American officer in World War II.  It’s written and performed by Patrick Dewane, the grandson of the play’s protagonist.

For years, Dewane would visit his grandparents' house and see WWII memorabilia decorating the house. He would beg his grandfather, Matt Konop, to tell him war stories, but he wouldn't talk.

Konop died in 1983 and Dewane "figured that we buried grandpa with his stories."

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

I'm about to rave about two audacious works of historical suspense fiction: I say "audacious" because you have to have some nerve to tackle the subject of whaling after Melville, or to structure your story around a painting, after so many other novelists — most recently, Tracy Chevalier and Donna Tartt — have kick-started their own tales with the same device.

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