Arts & Culture

Author Interviews
6:03 am
Sat November 2, 2013

'I Feel A Bit Like A Spy': A Q&A With Poet David Lehman

Cover of New and Selected Poems by David Lehman.
Courtesy of Scribner

Seventeen years ago, the poet, writer and editor David Lehman resolved to write a poem every day. It sounds a little similar to National Novel Writing Month, which kicked off yesterday — except that Lehman kept it up for five years, publishing many of the daily poems in literary journals and in two well-received collections

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Europe
5:46 am
Sat November 2, 2013

Turkey's 'Rockin' Imam' Inspires Youth, Tests Boundaries

Tuzer says there's nothing in his lyrics that could offend, but religious conservatives have opened an investigation into his musical activities.
Courtesy Ahmet Muhsin Tuzer

Originally published on Sat November 2, 2013 2:10 pm

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Author Interviews
5:46 am
Sat November 2, 2013

Fosse's Genius: Working Even As He Was Dying

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALL THAT JAZZ")

SIMON: The bowler hat, cocked just so; the jazz hands, splayed; the slouch and shoulder roll; the turned-in knee; the turned-around chair; the cane used for everything but walking; the bump and grind spun into a kind of poetry - the signature genius of Bob Fosse.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALL THAT JAZZ")

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History
5:46 am
Sat November 2, 2013

Churchill's Dirty Tricks Squad

Originally published on Sat November 2, 2013 10:36 am

As England was fighting for its life against the Nazis, the British government sent its most charming spies — including Roald Dahl, Ian Fleming, Noel Coward and David Ogilvy — to America to blackmail, bully and cajol the U.S. into the war effort. Host Scott Simon speaks with author Jennet Conant about her book, The Irregulars, and the British spy ring that operated in Washington, D.C., during World War II.

Simon Says
5:46 am
Sat November 2, 2013

Lincoln's 272 Words, A Model Of Brevity For Modern Times

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On the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, Museum and Foundation is inviting anyone to submit their own 272-word essay.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 2, 2013 7:10 pm

One-hundred-and-fifty years ago this month, President Abraham Lincoln uttered 272 words (which he did not write on the back of an envelope) that defined a nation and embodied eloquence when he spoke at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pa.

It is difficult for those of us who write to say we need more words to tell a story when Lincoln did so much with just 272.

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