Arts & Culture

Monkey See
10:13 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Morning Shots: In Which Kristin Wiig Gets Very Silly

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:37 am

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The Salt
9:56 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Community Supported Agriculture: How Big Is Too Big?

Grant Family Farms in northern Colorado launched an organic CSA in 2007 and eventually attracted 5,000 members. But it went bankrupt in 2012.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:43 am

The peak of the summer harvest is approaching, which means that if you have a community supported agriculture share, you may be receiving a daunting amount of fresh produce to cook every week.

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All Songs Considered
9:28 am
Tue July 16, 2013

New Video From David Bowie: 'Valentine's Day'

Courtesy of the artist

The latest in a series of videos for David Bowie's album The Next Day isn't a big budget spectacle, but it is thrilling and intense. The video, for the song "Valentine's Day," places Bowie in some sort of industrial, concrete warehouse with just his guitar. But Bowie's penetrating gaze and gritty delivery turns an otherwise benign performance into a chilling scene.

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Book News: Zimmerman Juror Drops Book Plans

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 7:40 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
6:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Lost And Found: 5 Forgotten Classics Worth Revisiting

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:25 pm

I don't remember when I first realized that books could go away, that they could — and did — pass into obscurity or out of print. Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal, All About H. Hatterr by G.V. Desani, Speedboat by Renata Adler, the sublime An Armful of Warm Girl by W.M. Spackman. Each of them, snuffed out. It seemed a scandal. But I vividly recall becoming aware that particular books were prone. To take chances with language or form was to court extinction.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

For The Love Of The Game: How Cricket Transformed India

Cricket Game
iStockphoto.com

The English language and cricket were Britain's two largest colonial legacies in India, says journalist James Astill, but it is the second of these bequests that is the subject of his important and incisive new book, The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption, And the Turbulent Rise of Modern India. Astill is a former bureau chief for the Economist in New Delhi, and he notes the parallels between the country's control of cricket and its dramatic economic rise.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Last Words: An Author's Rhymed Farewell

David Rakoff was a radio essayist for public radio's This American Life.
Deirdre Dolan

What a loss. That's the thought that kept running through my head as I flagged one inspired rhyme after another in David Rakoff's risky (though hardly risqué) posthumous first novel. Why risky? For starters, Rakoff, who died of cancer last summer, at 47, chose to write this last book in verse — albeit an accessible, delightful iambic tetrameter that is more akin to Dr. Seuss than T.S. Eliot.

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Sports
2:13 am
Tue July 16, 2013

An Unreal Sport: Mixing 'Fantasy Life' With Reality

Matthew Berry's new book, "The Fantasy Life," talks about how a made-up game has affected millions of lives, including his own.

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 5:21 am

It's the fourth most popular sport in the United States and more than 30 million people play it in the United States and Canada. Around 13 percent of Americans played it in 2012. There are hundreds of variations across multiple sports, but football is by far the most popular.

And it's pure fantasy.

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Food
2:12 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Cook Your Cupboard: Chowchow Down With Jacques Pepin

Samantha Lunn in Chattanooga, Tenn., wants to know what to do with currants, pickled onions and chowchow.
Courtesy of Samantha Lunn

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 5:22 am

This is an installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, an ongoing food series about working with what you have on hand. Have a food that has you stumped? Share a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites. The current submission category: Booze!

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The Two-Way
1:56 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Ex-Nixon Adviser Leonard Garment Dies At 89

Leonard Garment, acting White House Counsel, briefs the media at the White House on President Nixon's statement about the Watergate affair in 1973.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 12:54 pm

Former White House adviser Leonard Garment, who had been ill, died Saturday at his Manhattan home, his wife, Suzanne Garment, told The Associated Press yesterday. He was 89.

Garment and Richard Nixon met while working together at a law firm in 1963. He later went to work in the Nixon White House and became White House counsel.

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