Arts & Culture

Music Interviews
5:25 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Hanson Offers A Bold New 'Anthem'

Brothers Isaac, Taylor and Zac Hanson have been playing together since 1992.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 9:36 am

Isaac, Taylor and Zac Hanson achieved ubiquity in 1997 with "MMMBop," the mega-hit with the wordless, sing-along hook. But the brothers — aged 16, 14 and 11 at the time — had already been playing together for years. And they're still going.

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Music Interviews
4:59 am
Sun June 16, 2013

The Beatles' Defining Moment (Hint: It's Not 'Sgt. Pepper')

The Beatles pose in Liverpool's Derby Square in February 1963 — the year, according to author Colin Fleming, that yielded the band's most definitive work.
Michael Ward Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:15 pm

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Author Interviews
4:05 am
Sun June 16, 2013

'Children' Of Iran's Activists Inherit Love, Loss And Longing

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 1:41 pm

In the late 1970s, activists in Iran had a brief moment of hope. The revolution had succeeded; the shah's repressive regime had been overthrown. But things quickly turned for the worse. The newly formed Islamic Republic threw vocal dissenters in prison, and in 1988, it quietly executed thousands of them.

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Parallels
2:48 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Burning Down The House: Artistic Freedom Under Fire In Egypt

Egyptian employees of the Cairo Opera House and opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi hold placards during a demonstration inside the opera's compound in Cairo on May 30, following the dismissal of the head of the opera house. The firing is the latest salvo in a cultural war between artists and the ruling Muslim Brotherhood.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 2:50 am

On the morning of Oct. 28, 1971, Egypt woke up to a shock: The Khedivial Royal Opera House was on fire. The 100-year-old, rococo-style architectural gem in downtown Cairo burned to ashes. Ballet costumes, theater sets, musical instruments and velvet curtains were all gone.

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Sunday Puzzle
2:02 am
Sun June 16, 2013

You'd Better Sit Tight For This One

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 1:08 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts SI and the second word starts with T. For example, given "unadorned set of facts," you would say, "simple truth."

Last week's challenge: Name a movie in two words — five letters in each word. Both words start with vowels. Take one letter in the first word, move it two spaces later in the alphabet, and rearrange the result. You'll get the second word in the movie's title. What movie is it?

Answer: After Earth

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Arts & Culture
5:43 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Essay: Buttermilk Pancakes, Soapy Hands, and Dad

Dad's pancakes are always the best.
Credit Hannah Rosen/Flickr

On Father's Day, essayist Cari Carlson remembers her dad: from the early moments of safety and comfort he provided to her, through the role reversal in his later years when she took on the mantle of caregiver. (Note: The audio includes an extended version of this essay.)

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Arts & Culture
5:24 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Will Ryan Braun Face Game Suspensions?

The Brewers' Ryan Braun walks to the plate during a June 4 game against the Oakland Athletics.
Credit Mike McGinnis/Getty Images stringer

Lake Effect's Mitch Teich interviews sports contributor Howie Magner.

Sports contributor Howie Magner is kind of blue when he thinks about the Brewers.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
4:15 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

The Movie Jesse Eisenberg Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:15 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Around the Nation
4:03 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Fighting Unwanted Cat Calls, One Poster At A Time

New York artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh uses posters to combat unwanted cat calls and attention from men in her neighborhood.
Courtesy of Tatayana Fazlalizadeh

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 5:19 pm

It's hard to go unnoticed in New York City, with everyone checking out the latest fashions and hairstyles. As the weather warms, some women who are shedding those winter layers are finding themselves the object of more cat calls, whistles and roving eyes than they'd like.

Artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh is not going to take it anymore.

Under the cover of darkness, wearing a black knit hit, black leather jacket and black Chuck Taylors, Fazlalizadeh is nearly invisible. She's scouring Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, for a blank canvas.

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Author Interviews
4:03 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Telling Stories About Ourselves In 'The Faraway Nearby'

Brian Jackson iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 5:19 pm

Rebecca Solnit begins her new memoir, The Faraway Nearby, with a question: "What's your story?"

"It's all in the telling," she says. "Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and prisons out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of the world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice."

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