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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In 1984, two men were thinking a lot about the Internet. One of them invented it. The other is an artist who would see its impact on society with uncanny prescience.

First is the man often called "the father of the Internet," Vint Cerf. Between the early 1970s and early '80s, he led a team of scientists supported by research from the Defense Department.

Initially, Cerf was trying to create an Internet through which scientists and academics from all over the world could share data and research.

The average nine-inning baseball game took 3 hours and 8 minutes to play last season. That's up from 2 hours and 46 minutes in 2005.

Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred has had the goal of moving things along, and on Monday announced new rules aimed at shortening how long it takes to get a game played.

02/19/18: Life after a mass shooting

12 hours ago

A couple of weeks ago on this show, we told you about some of the funding and resources available for mass shooting victims to help with their short-term recovery. Today, we consider what life and work is like five, or even ten years after surviving a high-profile shooting. Two survivors of a mass shooting describe long term recovery. Also on today's show, we continue with our project called "Divided Decade," as we hear stories of how people's lives changed since the financial crisis ten years ago.

How Jerry Smith's Entrepreneurship Shaped His Career in Commercial Banking

16 hours ago

Jerry Smith's entrepreneurial streak helped shape a successful 45-year career in commercial banking. He was founding CEO of First Business Bank and its parent company. Jerry is now chairman of First Business Financial Services, a publicly traded company with a $200 million market cap and $1.8 billion in assets.

1. Trust your instincts and don’t quit

Why The AR-15?

18 hours ago

After nearly every mass shooting, a few words are repeated over and over: Thoughts. Prayers. AR-15.

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 

Even dogs need to have experience to get a job

22 hours ago

After a year and a half of basic coursework, six months of professional training, and a final exam, Patch — a Labrador-golden retriever mix — was ready to become an assistance dog for Annette Ramirez.

Ramirez, a 53-year-old resident from Manhattan Beach, California, is a quadruple amputee who lost her limbs due to a medical mishap that occurred when she was undergoing a hysterectomy back in 2012.

The economics of presidential libraries

23 hours ago

There’s more to Presidents Day than furniture and mattress sales. It’s a day when we recall the men who’ve held the country’s highest office. Thirteen presidents have libraries to jog the collective memory. We look at the economics of two presidential libraries.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

New tax law includes incentives for poor areas

23 hours ago

A line item in the tax law creates a new Opportunity Zone program, with incentives to draw business to underdeveloped places. This strategy has been tried by former administrations, and state and local governments, with results that have often been disappointing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

02/19/2018: Opportunities in the new tax law

23 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) There's a section in the new tax law that aims to help chronically poor, underdeveloped areas in the U.S. The law creates an Opportunity Zones program, which gives incentives to draw businesses to these regions. But do they actually work? We'll dive into that question on today's show. Afterwards, we'll look at the group that President Trump's 2019 budget would most likely impact — if it were to go into effect. Plus: We discuss the economics of two presidential libraries: Ronald Reagan's in California and Herbert Hoover's in Iowa.

Tim Armstrong: People need to vote on net neutrality

Feb 19, 2018

Less than a year ago, Yahoo and AOL officially merged after AOL’s parent company, Verizon, bought Yahoo for more than $4 billion. Since then, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has moved on to an unannounced venture. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has had the job of blending the two companies into a digital content behemoth named Oath, vying to challenge Facebook and Google for advertising revenue. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Armstrong about how Oath fits in the digital media landscape at the Makers conference in Los Angeles earlier this month.

The Source Code: Tim Armstrong

Feb 19, 2018

Tim Armstrong worked at Google for years, then as the head of AOL. Now he's the CEO of Oath, the company that was created when Verizon bought Yahoo, and Yahoo and AOL merged. In this long cut of the interview, Armstrong talks about the future of digital content, as well as the awkwardness of sponsoring a women’s leadership conference that doesn’t have former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer at it.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … There are calls for the boss of Latvia’s central bank to step down after he was detained over the weekend by the nation’s anti-corruption agency while his home and offices were raided. We’ll explain what’s next for the country’s banking system. Then, new details as a $1.7 billion fraud at India’s Punjab National Bank continues to unravel after the story came to light late last week. Afterwards, how De Beers is using blockchain technology to help make diamonds conflict free.

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