Economy & Business

Business news

05/22/2017: Ford to fire CEO Mark Fields

17 hours ago
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Marketplace

With Ford's stock down from 2014 levels, the company is gearing up to remove Mark Fields as CEO. We'll take a look at some of the criticisms that investors had about Fields, and who he's being replaced by. We'll also take a close look at one Rhode Island after-school program that faces closure over Trump's budget cuts. Plus: a look at the peripheral industry that's sprung out of crowdfunding, which includes crowdfunding consultants, social media managers and marketers.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates will donate a combined $100 million to a World Bank fund for women entrepreneurs that was the brainchild of Ivanka Trump.

The announcement by World Bank President Jim Young Kim came during a visit to Saudi Arabia by President Trump, who was accompanied by his wife, Melania, daughter Ivanka and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Copyright 2017 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

A new social network has grown quietly in recent months. It's called Gab, and its users are invited to #SpeakFreely — an appeal attractive to many members of the far right and others who feel their views are stifled by mainstream sites like Twitter and Facebook.

When Feld Entertainment, owners of Ringling Bros., announced it's cancelling the circus after nearly 150 years, it was one of the biggest victories yet for animal welfare activists.

How the circus treats it animals — especially elephants and big cats — has long been a focus for groups like the Humane Society of the U.S and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. They see it as part of a larger change going on in this country — about how Americans view animals and the way we treat them.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Google offered a glimpse of how it sees the future at its annual developer's conference this week. And it involves a lot of blending between the virtual and the real worlds using augmented and virtual reality. Google is calling that blend immersive computing.

Clay Bavor, who heads up Google's AR and VR division, says it's all part of a future where the virtual and real worlds blur.

On the steps above the makeshift stables, the circus priest is getting nostalgic.

"I did a baptism once in Fort Worth, Texas. ... I came in on an elephant carrying the baby, which was four weeks old," the Rev. Jerry Hogan says. "Now that baby is 15. I've married a lot of these kids and I've baptized their kids, and watched them grow."

It's late April at Baltimore's Royal Farms Arena, in the closing weeks of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey's "Out of This World" tour.

In the mayor's office on the second floor of Baltimore City Hall, Catalina Rodriguez-Lima has been uneasy lately. Rodriguez-Lima runs a city office whose mission is to attract new immigrants to Baltimore — a strategy for reversing decades of population decline. But President Donald Trump's plans to ramp up deportations of immigrants in the U.S. illegally have cast a pall over her efforts.

Episode 772: Small Change

May 19, 2017

Here is a thing we hear approximately every day: The world is changing faster than ever before. Robert Gordon doesn't buy it.

He's an economist who has spent decades studying technological change and economic growth in America. He argues that, contrary to popular belief, the world is not changing faster than ever before. In fact, it's not even changing as fast as it was 100 years ago.

Friday News Roundup - International

May 19, 2017

Turkey’s president comes to Washington, but it’s his bodyguards who leave a mark. Vladimir Putin says he can prove President Trump did not give secrets to Russia. And it’s a pilgrimage of sorts as Donald Trump prepares to visit Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican.

GUESTS

Edward Luce, Chief U.S. columnist and commentator, Financial Times; his latest book is “The Retreat of Western Liberalism”

Elise Labott, Global affairs correspondent, CNN

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Kai Ryssdal

The new “Alien” movie and the new “Guardians of the Galaxy” are expected to top the box office this weekend, both just the most recent examples of big tent pole productions that suck all the oxygen and money out of the movie-making ecosystem. So, with the summer movie season approaching, host Kai Ryssdal talked with New York Times culture critic Wesley Morris about what to expect in the upcoming summer blockbuster season.

The long tradition of being bored at work

May 19, 2017
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Bridget Bodnar

In this commentary, we hear from author Mary Mann, who ponders why we're bored at work and what it means about your job in her book, "Yawn: Adventures in Boredom." 

Boredom is this sort of irritated restlessness. A lot of times, people will avoid talking about boredom because it's kind of embarrassing. Nobody really wants to admit that they get bored.

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Marketplace

Rachel Abrams of the New York Times and Sudeep Reddy of Politico join us to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they talk about how the latest revelations from the White House will affect Donald Trump's economic agenda ahead of his trip to Saudi Arabia. Plus, with the controversies surrounding Trump and former FBI Director James Comey, we ask if people outside of the Beltway and New York are paying attention to it. 

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