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Later this month, Amazon shareholders will vote on whether the company should implement the Rooney Rule when appointing new members to its board of directors. The Rooney Rule stems from an NFL policy that requires at least one minority candidate be interviewed for certain management positions. However, Amazon’s current board of directors is recommending that shareholders vote against the proposal, saying it wouldn’t be an effective use of resources.

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The head of AirAsia, Malaysia's largest airline, has apologized for aggressively backing former Prime Minister Najib Razak, who was ousted in a surprise upset in last week's elections, saying he "buckled" at a crucial moment in the country's history.

Tony Fernandes, who founded the Kuala Lumpur-based low-cost airline in 1993, appeared in a Facebook video to address "my fellow Malaysians."

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82 Women Walk Cannes Red Carpet In Protest

May 13, 2018

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President Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, was in the spotlight this past week after AT&T confirmed it paid him more than half a million dollars for advice about the administration.

President Trump's goal of achieving "energy dominance" for the United States includes producing more oil and gas on federal land, but new government statistics show a mixed record on this front during his first year in office.

Trump has cast himself as an ally of fossil fuel industries. At a 2017 event he told energy industry leaders, "You've gone through eight years of hell," referring to the time former President Obama was in office.

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Caracas resident Barbara Rojas used to have a coveted position at Venezuela's state-run oil company, the kind of job that not so long ago people would hang on to until retirement due to the generous pay and benefits.

But in February, Rojas quit her job as an office administrator. She was disgusted that hyperinflation and the collapse of Venezuela's currency had rendered her wages nearly worthless. Rojas points out that nearly half of the 149 people in her office have walked off the job.

The swamp and the draining thereof

May 11, 2018

We wrap up the week’s news with Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post and Don Lee for the Los Angeles Times. This week, news of Michael Cohen consulting for AT&T broke, so we discuss the ethics involved. And in trade, House Speaker Paul Ryan set May 17 as a deadline to submit a NAFTA deal to Congress, so we talk about what may come. Later, we discuss the labor market and JOLTS — the Job Opening and Labor Turnover Survey — and what it means for unemployment in the nation.

In the 1940s, if you were flying from New York City to London or Paris you would find yourself making a pit stop for fuel on the western coast of Ireland. The Shannon airport at the time wasn't much to look at, but the passengers arriving there were movie stars and celebrities, basically the super rich. And the people of Shannon realized pretty quickly that they needed to upgrade the local amenities for their wealthy clientele. They hired a man named Brendan O'Regan to make it happen.

Many sticking points and little time in NAFTA negotiations

May 11, 2018

May 17. Next Thursday. That's the deadline House Speaker Paul Ryan has set for negotiators to notify Congress that they've reached an agreement on a revised version of the North American Free Trade Agreement if they want to get it through Congress by the end of the year. A May deadline for a December vote may seem aggressive, but the timeline goes something like this: The president has to notify Congress 90 days before he signs a trade agreement, and the full text of the agreement has to be made public a month later. There's other time built in for review and analysis.

On a rainy day in February, the Boca Chica area is fogged in. Terry Heaton stands on a raised porch in his backyard. He squints into the light rain.  

“You can’t see it now, but we have a beautiful view of Port Isabel. We see deer up here, a lot of coyotes. I mean, yeah, it’s, like, right there, like, boom,” he said, pointing toward the coast.

Heaton lives in Boca Chica Village, an isolated 45-minute drive from the border city of Brownsville.

President Donald Trump on Friday took the wraps off his long-awaited plan for cutting drug prices. In a speech, the president announced measures to increase competition and pricing transparency as ways to drive down costs, which have been spiraling. He did not put forward any plan to use the huge buying power of the federal government's Medicare program to directly negotiate lower prices for seniors. That's something candidate Trump pledged to do. Americans are seeking relief from ever-rising prescription costs. Will Trump's plan accomplish that?

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