Economy & Business

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The meal-kit delivery service, Blue Apron, filed its first quarterly results Thursday morning, revealing greater than expected losses and sending their stock price plummeting by 15 percent. 

08/10/2017: Markets go down, go figure.

Aug 10, 2017

All three major stock indices fell today, and not a little bit either. And guess what: That's what's supposed to happen. We'll talk about it when we do the numbers. Then: The White House touted a huge deal between Wisconsin an Foxconn: 13,000 jobs in exchange for $3 billion in tax breaks. The state won't break even for more than 25 years, but these deals are becoming more and more common. Plus: Most undocumented immigrants who are deported are Latino men with jobs. That has a ripple effect on housing.

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Delray Beach's charming downtown, palm trees and waves attract locals, vacationers and, increasingly, drug users who come here to try to get off opioids. In some parts of the small Florida community, there's a residential program for people recovering from addiction — a sober living house or "sober home" — on nearly every block. Sometimes two or three.

Blue Apron's stock went down 15 percent after its first earnings report, a disappointment to some who saw the company as a promising investment. Not every IPO does well, but there were some key things that Blue Apron should have disclosed, argues Marketplace regular Erik Gordon. He joined us to discuss some of the financial figures that the company failed to reveal before going public. Plus: Economist Diane Swonk is here to talk about data that indicates the opioid addiction has gotten to the point where it's squeezing America's labor supply — especially in rural areas. 

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Earnings for Nordstrom are expected later today. The retailer announced back in June that it was considering becoming a private company again. Buying out shareholders takes a lot of financing, and the company appears to be having a tough time getting formal talks going with potential investors. But that may not be such a bad thing for the retailer. 

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Relations between the U.S. and North Korea have seldom been more strained. President Trump has threatened to bring, “fire and fury like the world has never seen,” if North Korea continues to threaten the U.S. with military action. Pyongyang responded by saying it’s considering an attack on the U.S. territory of Guam. If it came to military conflict, the biggest cost would be in terms of human lives, but the global economy would take a hit too.

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It might be a good time to ask for a raise

Aug 10, 2017

At last, the outlook for the long-suffering American worker is starting to improve. The economy added more than 200,000 jobs in both June and July, the unemployment rate is just 4.3 percent, and wages are slowly ticking up, increasing about 2.5 percent from a year ago, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

That’s not as fast as many of us would like, but there may be something we can do about it, according to Mark Zandi, the chief economist of Moody’s Analytics.

In Detroit, a battle over the right to literacy

Aug 10, 2017

"I feel like I've been cheated."

This 17-year-old hacked the Air Force

Aug 10, 2017

It seems like we're hearing about hacking problems more and more now, from government hacks to the recent HBO hack. And since the internet isn't going anywhere soon, all we can do is find ways to patch the security holes that allow predators to get in.

That's the goal of bug bounty programs. They're projects that companies and organizations start to get people to find and report website vulnerabilities. Think of these hackers as the good guys — hackers in white hats. Plenty of big companies run bug bounty programs, including Facebook, Google and Uber.

Facebook and Instagram have replicated many of Snap's features, from face filters to disappearing messages, and that hasn't been great for business on Snap's end. Does it still have some creative power going for it right now? Business Insider senior reporter Alex Heath takes a look at the company's future with us. Afterwards, we'll talk to 17-year-old Jack Cable about that time he hacked the Air Force.

08/10/2017: Get ready to negotiate that raise

Aug 10, 2017

Deep into this slow economic recovery, American workers might finally be gaining the leverage to ask for more money (or they'll find work elsewhere.) On today's show, we'll discuss why their prospects are looking good. Afterwards, we'll discuss how military conflict between the U.S. and North Korea would affect the global economy, and then look at Nordstrom's (unsuccessful) attempts at going private.

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