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Until this spring, California port truck driver Alex Paz was considered an independent contractor. He had paid for fuel and registration of a truck, but the truck itself was owned by the trucking company. Some months, after the company deducted his costs, he ended up owing the company money.

"I didn't feel like I was working for myself," he says.

Under pressure from Paz and the Teamsters Union, the company reclassified him as an employee.

"It's a lot better because now you get paid. You know you're an employee," Paz says.

$100 billion: That's roughly how much the U.S. Treasury Department says Iran stands to recover once sanctions are lifted under the new nuclear deal. The money comes from Iranian oil sales and has been piling up in some international banks over the past few years. But there are questions about what Iran will do with this windfall.

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As you know, here at The Salt we've been a little obsessed with yogurt lately.

But there's a flip side to the story of the yogurt boom. What about that other product made from fermented milk that had its boom from 1950 to 1975, and has been sliding into obscurity ever since?

Cottage cheese took off as a diet and health food in the 1950s.

It's happy hour in Illinois. Well, not right this instant, but many are happy that happy hour is back.

Alcoholic drink specials were banned in the state more than 25 years ago, but Gov. Bruce Rauner overturned that yesterday.

There are still some restrictions: So-called volume specials — like two-for-one, or all-you-can-drink — are not allowed.

Happy hour also has to end by 10 p.m. That's fine with your hard-working, overnight-hours Morning Edition staff, so long as happy hour can start at noon.

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Whatever comes of the latest bailout plan for Greece, it may not be enough to save the country's economy, a new report from the International Monetary Fund says.

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