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As more executives accused of sexual harassment are being ousted from companies around the nation, including NPR, many are rethinking whether human resources departments are willing or able to handle the job of fielding and investigating complaints. Many have grown skeptical, after recent news stories suggesting some HR departments knew of issues, but failed to adequately respond. Many others have lost faith in HR through experiences of their own.

11/14/2017: Forget it Jake, it’s Washington

Nov 14, 2017

It’s a tax bill! It’s a healthcare bill! It’s a tax bill! It’s a healthcare bill? Just when we were beginning to fully grasp the Senate’s tax bill, Republicans throw in a repeal of the individual health care mandate. And, trade deficits: the president tweeted that he wants them erased — quickly — but why? Economists talk about ways to bring them down, and we have a report on the oil and gas industry, where one trade deficit could become a surplus. Plus, the bipartisan deal in the works to ease banking regulations, and the health risks of fracking.

The powerful hold of Silicon Valley's venture capital priesthood

Nov 14, 2017

Yesterday one of the most prominent venture capital firms in Silicon Valley had a name partner, Steve Jurvetson, resign amid a sexual harassment investigation. Silicon Valley doesn't exactly have a stellar reputation when it comes to gender issues, and it joins the list of industries under scrutiny in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against Harvey Weinstein. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with Molly Wood, host of Marketplace Tech, about the importance of venture capital in the tech ecosystem and how that affects startups run by women.

The Senate tax bill has a health care throwback

Nov 14, 2017

Senate Republicans are working on a tax bill, and today Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul formally proposed an amendment that would get rid of the Affordable Care Act's individual health insurance mandate. Sarah Kliff is the senior policy correspondent at Vox and the host of the new podcast "The Impact." Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal called her up to do a little tax bill unpacking. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

We're about a decade into an oil and gas revolution known shorthand as fracking. It relies on shooting high-pressure water mixed with chemicals down into layers of rock to crack the stone and release oil and gas. Pretty much since the fracking boom began, people who live near these wells have worried about chemicals getting into their water and making them sick.

A bipartisan group of senators has agreed to take a big step in loosening up some of the bank regulations that were put in place after the 2008 financial crisis under the Dodd-Frank law. They're backing a deal that would exempt small and regional banks from regulations and testing meant to ensure that financial institutions can survive certain economic shocks.   Is this a good idea? And who are the winners and losers?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

One front where the U.S. is closing its trade deficit: oil and gas. The International Energy Agency’s new World Energy Outlook forecasts astounding growth in U.S. shale oil production, a growth rate that rivals that of Saudi Arabia at its fastest. The agency said the U.S. will eventually sell more oil than it buys, and while that’s big energy news, it’s not enough to fuel the entire economy.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

What would happen if we reduced trade deficits quickly?

Nov 14, 2017

Fresh from his trip to Asia, President Donald Trump today tweeted that things must change when it comes to trade. "The United States has to be treated fairly and in a reciprocal fashion. The massive trade deficits must go down quickly!" he wrote. Now, most economists disagree with the president on whether the current U.S. trade deficits are the problem he says they are. But if the president could reduce America's trade deficit quickly, what would happen?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Updated at 12:01 ET Nov. 16

There are a lot of anxious graduate students at universities around the country right now.

That's because to help pay for more than $1 trillion in tax cuts for U.S. corporations, the House Republican tax plan would raise taxes on grad students in a very big way. These students make very little money to begin with. And many would have to pay about half of their modest student stipends in taxes.

41: Do you hear the people sing?

Nov 14, 2017

As we continue to ask the question of whether free-market capitalism is working for enough people, we found ourselves with another question — what happens when it doesn't? Political and economic disruption follows. New leaders emerge. Movements emerge again, like populism. 

(Markets Edition) With the House and Senate continuing to work out the details of their tax plans, we'll take a look at what their proposed cuts would mean in a tight labor market like this.

Fifteen billion dollars a year. That’s about how much historically black colleges and universities contribute to the U.S. economy each year, according to a new study released today by the United Negro College Fund and conducted by the University of Georgia. As Marketplace’s Reema Khrais reports, it’s part of a bigger strategy to highlight the relevance of HBCUs today.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

At the United Nations climate talks in Germany, White House officials are talking about plans to make fossil fuels cleaner or more efficient, and to expand nuclear power, as approaches to reducing emissions. While the rest of the world may be more into discussing renewable energy, the focus of the current U.S. delegation would reduce carbon as well, as fossil fuels and nuclear are expected to remain a big part of the global energy mix.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) A group of senators has announced that they're rolling back regulation on small and regional banks, along with credit unions. We'll go over some of the changes they plan to make, which include easing some Dodd-Frank requirements. Afterwards, we'll examine a new report that shows historically black colleges and universities are contributing $15 billion a year to the economy, and then we'll cap off today's show by looking at a nursing shortage that's forcing hospitals to close beds. One big reason: existing nurses aren't going into education.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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