Economy & Business

Business news

What's keeping your CEO up at night

Feb 14, 2018

The customer employee must come first.

Major cultural and social changes are happening in the business sector, which includes a greater emphasis on employee satisfaction.

Tech, like a lot of other industries, is dominated by men. Women get $3 in venture capital for every $4 that men do, according to tech site Crunchbase. And only 17 percent of startups have a woman as their CEO. Katrina Lake, the founder and CEO of Stitch Fix, has experienced that sexism first hand. In 2017, she was the only female CEO to take a company public in the U.S.

An inquiry is being conducted after allegations that the aid group Oxfam covered up a sex scandal involving some of its senior staff. There's money on the line to be lost, but also the worrying matter for any charitable organization of lost public trust.

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Getting Facebook out of controversy

Feb 13, 2018

It has been a rough couple years for Mark Zuckerberg and the company he owns. Facebook is at the uncomfortable center of the controversy over the 2016 election and how easily the company's news algorithms were duped by the Russians. And it is also being accused of spreading fake news on its site.

During the past two years, Zuckerberg has been trying to fix it all.

The Fed is expected to raise interest rates multiple times this year, which could affect interest rates and yields in the broader bond market. Today a top bond trader at Goldman Sachs forecast the yield on the 10-year Treasury will rise to as high as 3.5 percent by the summer. We haven’t been in a world of rising bond yields for quite awhile. So what does this mean?

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Markets wait for latest inflation number

Feb 13, 2018

The Labor Department will be out tomorrow with one measure of inflation: the consumer price index. You can bet a lot of people are going be paying special attention to that number, because investors have made it clear they’re worried about rising prices. Meanwhile, although it turns out we can measure inflation, it is really hard to predict.

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U.S. mortgage debt rises to $8.8 trillion

Feb 13, 2018

As of Dec. 31, Americans are $13.15 trillion in debt. That’s $193 billion more than the quarter before, according to the latest data released by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Most of that increase — about $139 billion — has been in mortgage debt. Americans owe a total of $8.88 trillion in mortgages loans.

The head of a major Hispanic business association is stepping aside after allegations of improperly increasing his salary and sexual misconduct.

The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce said president and CEO Javier Palomarez and its board of directors "have mutually agreed to undergo a leadership transition for the organization effective immediately," the organization said in a statement to NPR.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sanctions on Ice

Feb 13, 2018

North Korea has been getting sanctioned for decades. But in spite of the sanctions, North Korea has managed to keep buying fancy stuff for the elites — and fund a nuclear weapons program.

The country has done this by raising money through a clandestine outfit called Office 39. Among other things, Office 39 runs counterfeiting operations, engages in international bank fraud, and sells illegal drugs.

On today's show: sanctions, Office 39 and the North Korean Olympic team

02/13/2018: Brace for inflation

Feb 13, 2018

We'll get the latest monthly inflation numbers tomorrow morning, before the bell, and as we saw last week, markets are a little skittish. The thing about the Consumer Price Index is we can measure it pretty well, but predicting it is a lot harder. Then, we'll look ahead to the Fed and bond markets, and how interest rates could be affected by inflation. Plus: What we can learn from Facebook's "Two Years of Hell."

Bill Pugliano / Stringer / Getty Images News

General Motors’ entry into the zero emissions vehicle landscape started more than 20 years ago with its EV1 project.  The effort was, by most accounts, successful.  But the vehicles were all leased, and when the leases ran out, they were all returned to Chevrolet and unceremoniously destroyed.

When Dan Weiss was in grad school, in the 1980s, he'd pay a dollar to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The museum has had a "pay what you wish" policy in place since 1970. Later in life, Weiss chose to pay $5, and eventually the full suggested fee. These days, of course, Weiss gets in for free. He's the museum's president and CEO. "I pay with my life," Weiss laughed.

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