Economy & Business

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On today's show, we'll talk about steps Galaxy Note 7 owners should take with their phones amid reports that they're prone to overheating; Amazon's plans to open up brick-and-mortar convenience stores; and how DMVs might make your identity more secure in the future. 

Cable giant Comcast Corp. has been ordered by federal regulators to pay $2.3 million for wrongfully charging customers for gear and services they never requested. Officials say it is the largest civil penalty imposed on a cable operator.

On Tuesday, the Federal Communications Commission ordered Comcast to pay the fine after investigating complaints that some customers were charged for equipment such as set-top boxes, and services such as premium channels even after they had specifically rejected offers from Comcast representatives.

In the two-story breakfast room on the 25th floor of Hilton's Conrad Miami, Florance Eloi mans the omelet stand in front of a panoramic view of the sunrise over the Atlantic Ocean. The bubbly Miami native says, laughing, that guests routinely tell her, "Stop making the omelets, you need to turn around and look!"

When Eloi, 31, found out she was pregnant late last year, she wondered how she would balance her job with a baby. She was lucky to have a few weeks of paid vacation, since about half of lower-wage workers do not.

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday rolled out a new tax break that, if enacted, would put more money into the pockets of working parents with very young children.

The Democratic presidential candidate said she would push for a doubling of the current $1,000 tax credit for children ages 4 and under. An estimated 15 million children would be eligible.

There is a startup in the love industry that promised to help people find real relationships — not just sex. But, as with so many things in love, it didn't go according to plan. The app became yet another hookup app. Today, after 10 months of soul-searching, the startup is making a very public commitment to change.

It's called Hinge, and it's based in Manhattan's Flatiron District. Back in January, it was coming to grips with a crisis.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

The World Health Organization has already urged us to cut back on sugar, limiting added sugars to no more than 10 percent of our daily calories.

The next frontier for the Next Frontier

Oct 11, 2016
Sally Herships

"America will take the Giant Leap to Mars." That's the title of President Barack Obama's special guest editorial on CNN this week. In his piece, the president said there are now more than 1,000 companies in the U.S. involved in the business of outer space. Getting humans to Mars, he said, will take cooperation between the private sector and the government.  

A federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday that the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was unconstitutionally structured by Congress.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit decided that an independent agency should not be run by a single individual.

Kai Ryssdal

Well, this is just sad.

Kai Ryssdal

Kodak has suffered one of the most remarkable declines. At its peak, the company had about 150,000 employees; that's fallen to roughly 6,500. The company famously missed its chance to capitalize on photography’s move to digital and has re-tooled since then.

Aiming to attract and keep top-notch talent, a growing number of companies are dangling family-friendly perks such as lengthy paid leave for new moms and dads, back-up child care and onsite infant vaccines. But the attention-grabbing headlines — such as "IBM plans to ship employees' breast milk home" — obscure the reality that for many workers, basic benefits such as guaranteed parental leave, even unpaid, are unavailable.

Marketplace for Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Oct 11, 2016

What today's ruling means for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, what Obama's editorial means for our mission to Mars and how Alan Greenspan transformed the Fed. Plus: one sheriff's office used to destroy guns used in a crime. Now, it auctions them off.

Federal court decides against consumer watchdog agency

Oct 11, 2016

On Tuesday, a federal appeals court ruled that the way the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is set up is unconstitutional. The court decided against the CFPB and in favor of the mortgage firm PHH. The details of that company and its case are perhaps less important than what the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said broadly about the CFPB, the consumer watchdog agency created after the financial crisis.