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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

There's a fresh controversy for Facebook. Yesterday in an interview with the podcast Recode, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Holocaust deniers should be allowed to express their opinion on the social media platform.

What does summer sound like?

Jul 19, 2018

"Domestic car company" is kind of a misnomer these days. Auto manufacturers get parts from all over the world, and companies like Ford and General Motors stand to both benefit and be hurt by tariffs, making the politics much murkier. We'll talk about it, plus we'll hear from one business owner who applied for exclusions from steel tariffs and was denied. Plus, we'll talk about urban heat islands and how we crown the Song of the Summer. 

Why the auto industry (mostly) opposes proposed tariffs

Jul 19, 2018

The Trump administration imposed tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum first. It then added tariffs worth $50 billion on Chinese exports, which it may increase to $250 billion in the coming months. Since May, it’s also been considering whether to impose tariffs of up to 25 percent on imports of cars and auto parts.

Updated at 3:19 p.m. ET

The Federal Reserve got a rare piece of advice from the president Thursday. The central bank is an independent agency and presidents usually don't comment directly on Fed policy.

The American brand might be on the decline

Jul 19, 2018

(Markets Edition) President Trump has threatened "tremendous retribution" against the European Union over trade, possibly targeting imported cars, trucks and auto parts. We'll look at how groups representing automakers feel about these potential penalties, and what they mean for car prices. Afterwards, we'll chat with Diane Swonk, chief economist for the firm Grant Thornton, about what she expects the country's second-quarter GDP results to look like, and then we'll talk with political risk consultant Ian Bremmer about how America is doing as a brand.

Democrats on the powerful Senate Banking Committee said Kathy Kraninger is not qualified to be the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency the White House has nominated her to run.

Republicans at her nomination hearing Thursday said her management experience at the White House Office of Management and Budget qualifies her for the job.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is clarifying remarks he made about whether his platform should remove content posted by Holocaust deniers, saying he wasn't defending them when he commented that it was hard to know their intentions. His initial comments set off intense criticism earlier this week.

Summer brought to you by: Song of the summer

Jul 19, 2018

In the spring of 2017, DJ Khaled released “I’m the One.”

It was everywhere.

The song featured Justin Bieber, Quavo, Chance the Rapper, and Lil Wayne. In the music video, they’re at a mansion hanging by the pool. Bieber is in a bathing suit and women are dancing around in bikinis. The champagne is flowing. The grill is fired up.

Charlie Foster, promotions executive at Epic Records, which distributes DJ Khaled’s music, remembers when he first heard this song.

It has been an epic clash of media titans worthy of a blockbuster movie itself like, say, the X-Men — notably a property of 21st Century Fox. And as with any blockbuster franchise, there are already sequels lined up.

The broadband, cable and entertainment giant Comcast announced Thursday that it would withdraw from the field, conceding defeat in its audacious bidding war for most of the entertainment assets of Fox, controlled by the Murdoch family.

Tesla is synonymous with Elon Musk. Is that a problem?

Jul 19, 2018

Tesla CEO Elon Musk apologized this week not only to the cave diver involved in the recent rescue in Thailand, who Musk insulted, but also to the people who work for Musk. After months of erratic behavior swinging Tesla’s stock price, investors are worried about the visionary founder’s temperament.

(U.S. Edition) The Senate is voting today on Trump's pick to head the IRS (Charles Rettig), which comes during a week when the agency is getting blowback for a new policy. We'll discuss the rule, which says that certain types of nonprofits will no longer have to disclose their big donors. Afterwards, we'll look at how Tesla investors are getting worried about CEO Elon Musk's temperament, and then we'll talk to MIT economics professor David Autor about current trade tensions.

How the American brand is faring on the global stage

Jul 19, 2018

The U.S. has a certain brand image globally. That brand will be different to each person, but the way that brand appears is important for businesses abroad. 

The world's most controversial energy project

Jul 19, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Brussels is warning European businesses to do more to prepare for a "no deal" Brexit. With 253 days left until the U.K. leaves the European Union and no end in sight to British infighting, should businesses keep calm and carry on? Afterwards, we'll discuss how Cuba is preparing to change its constitution in a shake-up that will include recognition of private land ownership for the first time in more than 40 years. Then, it’s been branded the world's most controversial energy project.

Is Watson enough to carry IBM?

Jul 19, 2018

IBM reported earnings Wednesday. Most revenue came from cloud services, security and data analytics. Less impressive was its Cognitive Solutions department, which includes artificial intelligence, mostly under the brand of the "Jeopardy"-winning supercomputer Watson. Brandon Purcell, an analyst with Forrester, said IBM is selling artificial intelligence as a service through what’s called an API — application programming interface — which lets companies license the power of Watson and build their own tools on top of it, like digital assistants or in-house analysis tools.

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