Economy & Business

Business news

Companies try to avoid the Trump Twitter treatment

Jan 18, 2017

It's not even Inauguration Day yet, but we're getting a pretty clear sense of President-elect Donald Trump's negotiating style with corporate America. His tweets have chastised manufacturers like Carrier, GM and Ford for outsourcing jobs, prompting those companies to promise to add or retain jobs domestically. And now several others are promising expansions and investments before the Trump Tweet hammer falls.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

01/18/2017: Union City has hope, but it needs jobs

Jan 18, 2017
694A8178.jpg
Marketplace

In a lot of ways, the story of Union City, Pennsylvania is the story of the 2016 presidential election. Folks there have lost hundreds of manufacturing jobs, and now they're waiting in hope for President-elect Donald Trump to follow through on his campaign promise to bring them back. Then, we look at high-deductible health care plans through a researcher who experimented on himself and risked heart failure in the process.

Union City: a town waiting on Trump's promises

Jan 18, 2017
694A8178.jpg
Marketplace

On Tuesday, we introduced you to Erie County, Pennsylvania, where constituents in November voted for a Republican presidential candidate for the first time since 1984.

It's the start of "The Big Promise," our yearlong reporting project based in Erie. What happens in a place where the economy's changing, manufacturing jobs have left and those voters are counting on the promises the president-elect made during the campaign?

Trade, Trump and the theater

Jan 18, 2017

Trump's nominee for Secretary of Commerce, billionaire investor Wilbur Ross, has a lot of opinions on trade. Philip Levy, from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, breaks down what the department actually does when it comes to that issue. Next, we'll talk about Trump's relationship with our currency and the markets. The U.S. dollar fell to its lowest level in weeks after he said it was too strong. Is volatility something we need to get used to? Plus: a look at Woody Harrelson's plan to direct and star in a livestreamed film called "Lost in London." 

Live from London: It’s Woody Harrelson

Jan 18, 2017

In an effort to boost movie theater attendance on weekdays, Fathom Entertainment on Thursday will live stream “Lost In London,” a one-hour live movie shot by Woody Harrelson. Strong ticket sales could make a difference to this small but growing segment of the movie theater business.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Let’s do the numbers: the cost of inauguration

Jan 18, 2017
inauguration.jpg
Sabri Ben-Achour and Marketplace staff

President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration celebration Friday may cost millions of dollars, but American taxpayers aren’t footing the entire bill.

“The taxpayer pays for everything surrounding the actual ceremony that's involved with swearing in the president,” Washington Post reporter Roxanne Roberts told us. “But all the things that we typically think of as part of an inaugural — parade, the balls, the fancy parties — are privately funded by the Presidential Inaugural Committee.”

01/18/2017: 'Mutually assured economic destruction'

Jan 17, 2017
economicdeestruction.jpg
Marketplace

It's another week of confirmation hearings for Trump's cabinet picks. We'll share the highlights from Betsy Devos's contentious hearing, and look at what we can expect from Tom Price's. Next, Marketplace's Scott Tong will discuss what the relationship between the U.S. and China might look like after Trump takes office. Do we have a future trade war on our hands? 

netflix_4.jpg
Marketplace

Think the rise of digital means a reduced ecological footprint? Turns out streaming the latest hit show might be bad for the environment, according to a new Greenpeace report. Quartz's Ashley Rodriguez explains how exactly the streaming industry uses energyAfterwards, we'll look at news that online grocery stores will soon be allowed to accept food stamps, and then talk about the possibility of bendable phones.

In a flood of clemency orders before he leaves office, President Obama commuted the sentences of 209 people and pardoned 64 others on Tuesday. The vast majority of offenders had been convicted of drug-related crimes. Two were involved in cases about leaks of government material. And two were cultural stars of past decades who had run afoul of the IRS.

For several years, Oxfam International has released an annual report on global wealth inequity. The numbers were startling: In the 2016 report, Oxfam said the world's richest 62 people owned as much wealth as the poorest 3.6 billion.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As the presidency of Barack Obama comes to an end, we're taking stock - and so is he.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

In an article last month on state goals for 2017, China's Xinhua news agency reported, "China has lifted 700 million people out of poverty through more than 30 years of reform and opening-up," while aiming to "lift" 10 million more in the coming year.

nateemee / Fotolia

As the stock markets opened today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was running at just over 19,885.  If things go especially well today, it could very well finish over the 20,000 mark for the first time in history. 

This may seem monumental, but award-winning Washington Post financial columnist and Marketplace Morning Report contributor Allan Sloan says not to get too excited.

Pages