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A $3.9 billion merger that would combine Tribune Media and Sinclair Broadcasting is waiting in the wings. Sinclair is already the nation’s biggest broadcaster with 193 television stations and if the rules change, they’ll add 42 more, including in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.

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(U.S. Edition) With the House GOP set to vote today on its plan for American taxes, we'll chat with someone who's been through a big tax overhaul before: Gene Steuerle, who heads the non-partisan Tax Policy Center. He joined us to talk about the basic principles most people can agree with when it comes to tax reform. Afterwards, we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about how Congress' tax plans might affect none other than President Donald Trump.

 

This week, another big name in tech was toppled by accusations of sexual harassment — venture capitalist Steve Jurvetson, an investor in Tesla and SpaceX who left his prominent Silicon Valley company.

The big-money world of Silicon Valley remains dominated by men and remains a hard place for women to speak out if they want to join the ranks of its richest. And some women think the best way to fight harassment is to tread carefully and get to the top.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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President Trump is going to take the short trip down Pennsylvania Avenue today. He's going over to the Capitol, and I'm pretty sure he's hoping to do a victory lap of sorts when he gets there.

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(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... There are some fresh warnings today about serious risks facing China's economy. A senior government official told a conference in Beijing the country's financial sector needs quick reform to avoid crisis. Afterwards, a new study says many of the effects of climate change are inevitable, even if the world radically cuts carbon dioxide emissions now. Then, we hear from a French winemaker about the hype and history of Beaujolais Nouveau Day.

Toronto is building a billion-dollar mini smart city

Nov 16, 2017

Not all tech is in Silicon Valley. Many cities around the world are trying to grow their own industries. Recently, the city of Toronto partnered with Sidewalk Labs, a subsidiary of Alphabet, to build a billion-dollar mini smart city on its waterfront. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Mayor John Tory while he was in New York looking to increase tech investments. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Molly Wood: How local is the local tech economy doing?

As more alleged victims of sexual harassment have come forward in recent weeks, it's clear that they've found strength in numbers.

But workers' rights advocates fear that cases before the Supreme Court could end up limiting employees' abilities to bring collective action on harassment and other issues in the workplace.

11/16/2017: Smart cities are collecting your data

Nov 16, 2017

Smart-city technology is becoming more common, from Singapore to San Jose. The latest city to incorporate this technology into its infrastructure is Toronto. It recently partnered with Alphabet subsidiary Sidewalk Labs to redevelop a section of city waterfront. Lots of sensors will collect data on traffic, noise and temperature. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talked with Toronto Mayor John Tory about the city’s tech investments and how data collection will be regulated.

When campaigning for the presidency, Donald Trump touted his business experience, saying he would be able to relate to other executives and negotiate with them.

But then three months ago, he abruptly disbanded his business advisory councils — via Twitter — after several CEOs resigned in the aftermath of his comments on race-related violence in Charlottesville, Va.

So as Trump considers big changes in trade and tax policy now, how is he getting input from CEOs?

The administration told NPR it gets guidance on an informal "issue by issue basis" from CEOs.

Last night Senate Republicans made some major changes to their mammoth tax bill, including some improvements for the middle class. But these credits and lower rates are temporary — they would sunset beginning in 2025, and tax cuts for corporations would be permanent. Plus, we talk about changes to the financial regulatory environment under the Trump administration, a potential merger between giants AT&T and Time Warner and play part two of our report on the health risks associated with fracking operations.

Songs of struggle, then and now

Nov 15, 2017

The musical bridges in this week's episode of Make Me Smart are examples of music that emerged from populist movements in the United States. "The Farmer is the Man" is a populist protest song from the late 19th century, when farmers protested low inflation and low crop prices. As professor Sheri Berman pointed out in the podcast, this led to the creation of the populist party.

The Cigna CEO on what happens when health care is politicized

Nov 15, 2017

Health insurance is a complicated business, but David Cordani, CEO of Cigna Health Insurance, says he's never seen a more complex time for the industry. Most of Cigna's business comes from employer-provided health insurance, but it also operates on a half-dozen health care exchanges in the United States, sells direct to seniors on Medicare Advantage and does a chunk of overseas business.

Head of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau will step down

Nov 15, 2017

Richard Cordray announced today that he's leaving the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau by the end of the month. President Donald Trump will get to appoint Cordray's successor, giving him yet another way to reshape U.S. financial regulation. We take a look at how the president is putting his stamp on these regulations. 

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The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, Republican Orrin Hatch, unveiled the latest version of the Senate’s proposed tax overhaul last night. On the face of it, there’s a bit more in this bill for the middle class. The plan would expand the child tax credit and slightly lower some tax rates. But here’s the catch — those changes would be only temporary. Corporations, though, would get a permanent tax cut. 

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