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There's a good chance you're hungry for information you didn't even know you wanted, but Google knows — and the tech giant is going to spoon-feed it to you.

Google is following in Facebook's footsteps, with plans to redesign its popular search page on mobile phones so that you'll get something similar to the social media site's news feed. Only Google's will just be called "feed."

What happens to abandoned cars

Jul 19, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands? What do you wonder?

07/19/2017: A chipmaker's challenges

Jul 19, 2017
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Marketplace

Qualcomm may not be a household name, but its chips are inside a household item: your phone. On today's show, we'll look at the company's ubiquity, along with the struggles it's been facing as smartphone makers decide to find solutions in-house. Afterwards, we'll discuss the announcement of Bluetooth Mesh, the idea that eventually all your Bluetooth devices may be able to talk to each other separately from your Wi-Fi network. 

07/19/2017: Let it fail, or make it fail?

Jul 19, 2017
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Marketplace

Republicans didn't have the votes to neither replace nor repeal Obamacare, so President Trump has said to just let it fail. One way to do that is to stop paying the billions in subsidies to insurers that cover out-of-pocket costs for low-income Americans. On today's show, we'll look at how plausible it is that that these payments will get halted. Afterwards, we'll discuss the House's consideration of a proposal that would bar states from setting their own rules for self-driving cars, and then talk about how to make the most of your travel points.

Investors sent shares of the Internet streaming service Netflix soaring after the company reported that it had beaten forecasts and attracted 5.2 million new subscribers worldwide, increasing its membership to 104 million.

"We also crossed the symbolic milestones of 100 million members and more international than domestic members. It was a good quarter," Netflix wrote in its second-quarter letter to shareholders.

Chipotle saw its stock dip Tuesday after it temporarily closed a Sterling, Va., restaurant where several people reported getting sick.

"That is an especially sensitive issue for Chipotle, which struggled with recurring problems with foodborne illness two years ago that caused its stock price to plummet," NPR's Yuki Noguchi told our Newscast unit. "Investors showed signs of nervousness again today, with the stock losing, at one point, more than 7.5 percent in value."

State legislatures and city halls are battling over who gets to set the minimum wage, and increasingly, the states are winning.

After dozens of city and county governments voted to raise their local minimum wage ordinances in the last several years, states have been responding by passing laws requiring cities to abide by statewide minimums. So far, 27 states have passed such laws.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In an essay on Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf observed, "Of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness."

To that double-edged and astute assessment, one can add, she is also the most difficult to catch in the act of tea-time.

This observation might seem irksomely contrarian to the legions of Janeites in hats and bonnets gathered around tea and scones to pay fealty to the novelist on the bicentenary of her death, which falls today.

Milk Prices 101

Jul 18, 2017
Kadmy / Fotolia

It may come as no surprise that much of our agriculture is wrapped up in dairy - after all, Wisconsin is called America's Dairyland. But despite the moniker, Wisconsin is not immune to the market forces that drive the price of dairy both here and throughout the country.

You might notice when you go to the grocery store, the price of milk varies a lot. In fact, it changes so much that it’s routine for some groceries and delis to post the price outside of the store - like signs at a gas station.

Neighborhood rebranding prompts gentrification worries

Jul 18, 2017
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Adam Allington

What’s in a name, you ask? Well, kind of everything, at least if you’re asking someone from Harlem, in New York. Backlash has been swift and fierce against what was supposed to be a simple, catchy acronym: SoHa, short for South Harlem. That is what some realtors in the city have taken to calling part of the neighborhood. 

Some residents have said this kind of backdoor re-branding smacks of gentrification. But the practice of creative neighborhood renaming is actually quite common in real estate, and in some cases can speed up economic development. 

The White House is showcasing products from each state as part of its "Made in America" week.

The list includes some iconic U.S. brands — for example, Gibson Guitars from Tennessee and Steinway pianos from New York. Vermont Maple syrup and California wine are on the list. American flag manufacturers are highlighted from two states (Utah and Virginia).

Some of the choices are less obvious, like wheel barrows from Pennsylvania and door hinges from Missouri.

UK honors Jane Austen 200 years after death

Jul 18, 2017
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Sam Beard

The Bank of England unveiled a new 10 pound note in Winchester on Tuesday. The date and the location of the unveiling were carefully chosen because adorning the new currency is an image of Jane Austen, who died 200 years ago on this day and is buried in the southern English city. 

 

On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, the Bank of England has unveiled a new banknote featuring the beloved author.

The new notes, made of polymer, will be entering circulation in September.

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