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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Updated at 12:14 p.m. ET

Only 1,599,888,909 euros to go. A crowd-funding effort to raise the 1.6 billion euros (about $1.8 billion) Greece needs to make a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund has so far raised 111,091 euros ($124,569) from 7,275 donors.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

The International Monetary Fund confirms that Greece has officially missed a loan payment and is in arrears.

Just hours before Greece was due to make the payment of approximately $1.8 billion dollars, the Greek government asked for a new bailout from countries that use the euro currency.

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Copyright 2015 WUIS-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wuis.org/.

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An agency of the federal government will have to stop doing business today. That's because members of Congress went home last week for the July Fourth recess without reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank.

The bank helps American companies sell their goods overseas. The bank's critics say they're stopping corporate welfare.

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President Obama is expected to release this week a long-awaited rule governing overtime that could affect 5 million people as soon as next year, a source familiar with the plans confirmed to NPR.

The proposed rule would more than double the salary cap under which most workers would qualify for overtime pay whenever they work more than 40 hours a week, the source said. The cap would be raised from $23,660 to $50,440, and indexed to wage growth or inflation, ensuring the cap would move with the overall economy.

Spotify, Google Play, Amazon Prime, Rdio, Rhapsody, Pandora — the list of streaming music service goes on and on. On Tuesday, Apple joins that lineup with the launch of its streaming service, Apple Music. Apple will give consumers a three-month trial, and then it will charge $9.99 a month.

But most music lovers still aren't sure why they should pay. Colin Barrett, 31, has tried a few of the streaming services, but he doesn't use them anymore.

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