Economy & Business

Business news

Why are investors punishing the pound?

Jan 16, 2017

The British pound's sizable fall on Monday; pushback against the World Economic Forum; and the rise of food insecurity on college campuses.

 

MLK Day has become a day of service for many. Those that are off may take the time to volunteer. For others, their employers may provide a day for annual volunteering, a benefit that is especially attractive to younger workers.

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Business and political  leaders descend on the Swiss Alpine resort of Davos this week for the latest annual World Economic Forum. They do so against a backdrop of rising populism, and opposition to some of things that Davos has promoted, like globalization. Some critics have attacked the event itself as elitist and blamed it for turning U.S. and European  citizens against free trade. 

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Jennie Cecil Moore

In Seattle, University of Washington senior Taylor Herring combines grants and part-time work to cover tuition and necessities. But toward the end of the quarter, his account gets pretty low.

“I think my second quarter here, after going through my second quarter running out of food, I was like, 'Well, do I need to buy this book?' I mean it’s so expensive, whereas later on I might need that,” Herring said.

Prosecutors in South Korea have requested an arrest warrant for the de facto head of the nation's biggest conglomerate, Samsung, on charges of bribery and embezzlement in connection with a swirling scandal that led to the president's impeachment.

Amazon has announced plans to add more than 100,000 full-time jobs over the next 18 months.

The news comes as U.S. companies try to burnish their credentials as a job-creator — a priority of the incoming Trump administration. Amazon’s growth isn’t a complete surprise, however, for a company expanding into so many different product categories.

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Catherine Green

In November, Los Angeles voters committed $1.2 billion to addressing homelessness with passage of a proposition called HHH. The city's homeless population is second only to that of New York, a city twice its size. About 28,000 people are estimated to be sleeping on the streets of LA on any given night.

01/16/2017: A $50 billion eyewear merger

Jan 15, 2017
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Marketplace

Eyewear maker Luxottica — known for its Ray-Ban shades — is merging with lens maker Essilor to create a company worth $50 billion. We'll explore the future of the eyewear market and explain why a deal between these two types of companies is so unusual. Next, we'll talk about Amazon's job growth plans, and then look at how Los Angeles plans to allocate $1.2 billion of funds dedicated to the homeless. 

01/16/17: Trump TV

Jan 15, 2017
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Marketplace

The Internet Archive has launched a library of Trump's television appearances — the first of its kind for an incoming president. We'll hear from one of the archive's managing editors, Nancy Watzman, about why they created the collection and what they hope it's used for. Afterwards, we'll take a tour of of the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, a new playing venue for the Atlanta Falcons that's set to open later this year.  

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Every child wants to grow up to be independent — to leave their parents' home, find work, build a life of their own.

But that seemingly simple step into adulthood can be a monumental challenge for children with developmental disabilities like autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, or any of a range of other such disabilities that affect about one in six American children, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

President-elect Trump told a press conference Wednesday that he would step back from running his company to prevent possible conflicts of interest once he's in office. To help prove it, he said he had just rejected a $2 billion deal to develop a golf course in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, adding that he wasn't required to do so because he isn't bound by any conflict-of-interest laws once he's president.

Episode 747: The Man Who Sued Iran

Jan 13, 2017

Steve Flatow's daughter, twenty-year-old Alisa Flatow, was studying abroad in Israel. One day she was on a bus in the Gaza Strip, and a suicide bomber blew the bus up. Alisa died in the attack.

The bomber was part of a group called Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which the U.S. State Department believed was funded by Iran. Flatow decided to sue Iran for monetary damages. But under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, U.S. citizens couldn't sue countries.

Check cashing stores and payday loan centers have a checkered reputation, to put it mildly. Critics say their high interest rates and fees take advantage of people who are already financially disadvantaged. But the truth is, these alternative financial systems are proliferating in Wisconsin and around the country.

Writer Lisa Servon wondered why. Servon is a professor of city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania and her new book is called The Unbanking of America: How the New Middle Class Survives.

The Japanese air bag manufacturer Takata has reached a $1 billion settlement with the U.S. Justice Department over a deadly defect in its air bags that led to a massive recall.

At least 16 deaths, 11 of them in the U.S., have been linked to the defect.

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