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Undergoing treatment for cancer is hard enough by itself. And for many cancer patients who spend most of their time in a hospital, it gets even harder with the loss of basic comforts. The hospital's sterile environment, the fluorescent lights and the disposable gowns do little to make medical treatment more bearable. Nikla Lancksweert, wanted to do a little something to help with that dehumanizing experience, focusing on an alternative for those uncomfortable hospital gowns.

Duncan Hines, traveling salesman and future purveyor of boxed cake mix, considered himself an authority on a great many things: hot coffee, Kentucky country-cured ham and how to locate a tasty restaurant meal, in 1935, for under a dollar and a quarter.

By the 1950s, Hines' name would be plastered on boxes of cake mix; housewives would turn to his products for consistent quality and superior taste. Newspaper photographs featured Hines clad in a white chef's apron, hoisting a neatly frosted cake or thoughtfully dipping a spoon into a mixing bowl.

Copyright 2017 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit KQED Public Media.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The African Global Economic and Development Summit took place at the University of Southern California from March 16th to 18th.

None of the approximately 60 invited guests from Africa were able to attend.

The problem was that none of the African delegates were able to get U.S. visas.

Humphrey Mutaasa from the mayor's office in Kampala, Uganda, had organized a delegation of 11 business leaders from Uganda to attend the African Global Economic and Development Summit at the University of Southern California.

The negotiator-in-chief couldn't seal the deal.

President Trump, the former businessman who has never been shy about touting his negotiating skills, has for several weeks been involved in a high-profile negotiation and persuasion effort with members of his own party in an effort to pass the American Health Care Act.

That effort failed.

But this is how Trump sold himself.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There are beers that can make headlines simply by existing, especially if they use unique ingredients. That's the case with Stone Brewing's Full Circle Pale Ale, whose key component — water — came from an advanced filtration system that recycles and purifies San Diego wastewater that had previously been used in taps, toilets and showers.

Will the iPhone (RED) boost Apple's sales?

Mar 24, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

Apple’s new iPhone 7 — a distinctly colored red iPhone — is on sale today. The newest iPhone is a collaboration between Apple and Bono’s (RED) Campaign, but while the phone is connected to a charitable cause, it may also mean a bump in sales.

Mitch Teich

Employees at Oak Creek-based Master Lock will spend the next few weeks getting used to a new workspace.  Starting Monday, the company begins moving into its new corporate headquarters, just a couple miles from its current offices. 

Most baby boomers say that they plan to keep working past conventional retirement age. But to do that, they have to get hired first. New research shows that can be harder when you're older.

The House Republicans' embattled health care bill has plenty of detractors: Democrats, hospitals, the American Medical Association and the House Freedom Caucus all oppose it. But the insurance industry is not on that list, even though it stands to lose millions of customers.

One reason is that insurers' profits are expected to fatten under the bill.

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Scott Tong

An insider says pollution from a Nigerian oil spill in a pipeline owned by Shell's parent company remains “astonishingly high” nearly a decade on.

In 2008, two Shell pipelines burst in a part of Nigeria known as the Bodo community. Local villagers asserted in court that the amount spilled equals that of the Exxon Valdez tanker disaster from 1989.

Even with approval, Keystone pipeline may not get built

Mar 24, 2017

The Trump administration has approved a construction permit on the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline. Back when it was planned in 2010, oil was still trading at $100 a barrel and fracking had yet to fully ramp up. The project still serves as a symbol for both environmentalists and energy companies. But the overall impact of the pipeline may be less than originally thought, both in environmental terms and its demand from a market that is already flush with supply.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Why hiring a new CEO can be really difficult

Mar 24, 2017

The world’s biggest entertainment company is taking a little more time to choose a new CEO. Disney announced it will extend the contract for CEO Robert Iger for another year, until 2019. This is the third time Disney has extended Iger’s contract. He was originally supposed to retire in 2015, but Disney keeps convincing him to stay on, this time with a $5 million bonus for the extra year. Disney isn’t the first company to have trouble putting a succession plan in place. Why is it so hard?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

What people get wrong when they talk about NAFTA

Mar 24, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

This story is from our special series that explores NAFTA’s role in our economy from the perspective of workers, business owners and trade negotiators. What exactly is NAFTA? And what happens if it changes? Join us to discuss how one of the most hotly contested issues in our society shapes the way we live.

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