Economy & Business

Business news

Netflix brings award-winning producer on board

Feb 14, 2018

Netflix has made a deal to bring prolific producer Ryan Murphy into the fold to create a bunch of binge-able series and movies. The five-year deal is reported to be worth $300 million. It's the streaming giant's latest move to book top-level talent. Less than a year ago, Netflix signed an estimated $100 million four-year deal with Shonda Rhimes. The company is clearly doubling down on original content.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Does data mean retailers are pulling back?

Feb 14, 2018

We got some number today hot off the keyboards of the folks at the Commerce Department. They show that retail spending in January was lower than December by 0.3 percent. That dip was notable because the consensus was actually that it would be slighter higher. A drop when you’re expecting an increase, that turned some heads.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Why the pace of Muslim women entering the workforce is accelerating

Feb 14, 2018

There’s a old saying that’s true for the politics of any given economy and economics writ large: demography is destiny. Who's in your workforce matters a whole lot, and across the Muslim world, that’s increasingly women. Saadia Zahidi is the head of Education, Gender and Work at the World Economic Forum. She talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about her new book, "Fifty Million Rising: The New Generation of Working Women Revolutionizing the Muslim World." The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Stimulus Response

Feb 14, 2018

Jared Bernstein has a dilemma. He's a liberal economist, and he's been saying for years that the U.S. needs stimulus — some combination of higher spending and lower taxes — to drive up wages for workers.

Congress and the President recently passed bills to raise spending and cut taxes.

These weren't sold as stimulus packages. They are not Jared Bernstein's dream come true. But they are going to mean lower taxes and higher spending.

We hate days like this, when there's been a shooting in a school or at a concert. There's no economic angle right after a tragedy like this. It's not our story, but we can't ignore it. So we're gonna acknowledge it, trust that you've had your fill of it elsewhere and turn to our news of the day. It came this morning with a much-anticipated but kind of underwhelming report on inflation. It's up a bit, but nowhere near as drastic as we'd all expected it to be. Nevertheless, it's one more data point for policymakers to consider as they figure out how to steer this economy.

For Dallas Fed president, sustaining long-term growth will take more than tax cuts

Feb 14, 2018

The Consumer Price Index rose 0.5 percent in January, a bit ahead of market expectations. While it's easy to read a lot into a single data point, this is just one of the figures that policymakers use as they decide how to steer the economy. Robert Kaplan, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, is one of those policymakers. He sits on the Federal Open Market Committee, one of the bodies that helps the Federal Reserve set monetary policy. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal sat down with Kaplan to discuss the state of the economy.

Richard Klein switched doctors last year. The new doctor put him on a new blood pressure drug.

But it didn't help.

The failure was entirely predictable.

Klein, an associate professor at Florida International University in Miami, realized later that he had tried the same medicine unsuccessfully a few years before, but he hadn't remembered that fact during the appointment.

It was an understandable mistake for Klein and his doctor.

deavmi / Wikimedia

The refugee crisis is still a huge problem. It affects the developing world as people leave war-torn or famine-stricken countries and resettle in refugee camps, often in other developing nations. And it affects countries like the United States and western European nations as refugees seek to build new lives in places with economic opportunities.

But those economic opportunities are not always accessible to refugees - sometimes because of immigration policies, but often because they have no way to validate their history or their identity.

Stitch Fix's CEO says there should be more seats at the table, not in investors' hot tubs

Feb 14, 2018

Tech, like a lot of other industries, is dominated by men. Women get $3 in venture capital for every $4 that men do, according to tech site Crunchbase. And only 17 percent  of startups had a woman as their founder in 2017. Katrina Lake, the founder and CEO of Stitch Fix, has experienced that sexism first hand. In 2017 she was the only female CEO to take a tech company public in the U.S.

A tax credit that has helped to revitalize historic buildings across the U.S. was almost eliminated during the recent tax overhaul. But advocates for the tax credit pointed out that every congressional district has at least one historic tax credit project. Nationwide, more than 1,000 projects took advantage of this credit in 2017.

Oakland is a city that's rapidly gentrifying, shedding much of its African-American population along the way. The California city, which was 47 percent black in 1980, is now divided roughly into a quarter each of black, white, Asian and Hispanic residents.

The sense of the city's changing identity has ended up helping Adrian Henderson's business. He's co-owner of Kingston 11 Cuisine, a Caribbean restaurant in a neighborhood that's changed so much lately that it goes by the dual name of Koreatown Northgate.

Twitter has banned Paul Nehlen, a Republican challenging House Speaker Paul Ryan for a congressional seat, for a racist tweet targeting American actress Meghan Markle, the fiancée of Prince Harry.

02/14/2018: What next, Jay Powell?

Feb 14, 2018

(Markets Edition) It turns out inflation is running higher, based on new data from the Consumer Price Index. We'll talk to Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group, about whether we should worry about these figures and what we should expect from the Federal Reserve. Afterwards, we'll look at allegations that the VIX Index, a measure of the stock market's expectations of volatility, is rigged. 

YouTube and Instagram are being asked to take down videos and photos at the center of a controversy involving a prominent Russian billionaire and a senior Russian government official.

This follows a high-profile investigation into the men's relationship by Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

Clothing and car insurance prices drive inflation

Feb 14, 2018

WASHINGTON — U.S. consumer prices, excluding the volatile food and energy categories, rose 0.3 percent last month. That was the biggest climb in a year and is likely to fan inflation fears in financial markets.

The Labor Department says overall consumer prices rose 0.5 percent in January, the most in four months. Inflation rose 2.1 percent from a year earlier and core prices increased 1.8 percent. The increases were led by much higher clothing costs and more expensive car insurance.

Pages