Economy & Business

Business news

Updated 9:45 a.m. ET

The White House is banging the drums that President Trump is doing something big again ahead of his 100th day in office — unveiling a tax "plan."

"This is going to be the biggest tax cut and the largest tax reform in the history of our country," Trump's Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said at a panel Wednesday morning.

Different states spend vastly different amounts on their children, according to a new study out this week. The Urban Institute, a think tank in Washington, looked at spending on public schools, health, and social services and found that the national average is just shy of $8,000 per kid. Some states spend a lot more per pupil than others. The disparities raise questions of fairness and the impact of funding.  

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Cream cheese has a history wrapped in tin foil

Apr 26, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands?

Copyright 2017 WSHU Public Radio Group. To see more, visit WSHU Public Radio Group.

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Trump To Talk Tax Plan

Apr 26, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Why presidents rarely tackle tax reform

Apr 26, 2017

President Trump is set to unveil a tax reform agenda today. One of the centerpieces is expected to be his campaign promise to cut the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent.  But tax cuts and tax reform are two different things. The last real crack the U.S. took at tax reform was back in 1986, more than three decades ago. Why is tax reform so hard that most administrations simply skip it? 

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How the Panic of 1837 predicted the Great Recession

Apr 26, 2017
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David Brancaccio

You may have slept through the lesson your U.S. history class gave on the Panic of 1837, but it's a prophetic subject given the stark similarities it shares with the Great Recession. 

Back then, a booming American cotton industry drove banks to lend money to land prospectors, which in turn, created a land bubble.

Then that bubble went bust.

Following the economic disaster, Americans blamed inner failings — not policy or institutions.  

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D Gorenstein

Paying for health care is an issue that worries many people. In the latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, 75 percent of respondents said they were fearful they weren’t going to be able to afford the services they or their family needs.

Yet some state and federal lawmakers want people on Medicaid — the health program primarily for children, people with disabilities and low-income Americans — to be more concerned about health care costs.

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Marketplace

Alphabet's self-driving car unit, Waymo, will now expand its operations in Phoenix, Arizona — a city where Uber has also tested its autonomous vehicles. Why Phoenix? Well, it's in a state that appears friendlier than others to self-driving technology, and there's a growing tech scene going on there. Brian Sherman, a senior vice president at Arizona Commerce, shares what exactly his organization is doing to support innovation in the region.

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Marketplace

President Trump has been talking about tax reform for a little while now. Well, today's the day we're getting a roll out of his plan. We'll dive into the proposals we might see from the White House, which could include a call for lower corporate tax rates and a re-adjustment of the country's income tax brackets. Afterwards, we'll look at how previous presidents have attempted to reform the American tax system, and then explore a radical proposal in Wisconsin that may increase the state's monthly health care premiums. 

TV and film writers resumed contract negotiations Tuesday with Hollywood producers with a powerful bargaining tool. Late Monday, the Writers Guild of America said members had overwhelmingly authorized a strike if an agreement is not reached by May 1. That's when the current contract runs out.

More than 90 percent of eligible writers voted to authorize a strike, even though the last strike a decade ago cost some writers their jobs and shut down TV and movie production.

The Cherokee Nation is suing top drug distributors and pharmacies — including Wal-Mart — alleging they profited greatly by "flooding" communities in Oklahoma with prescription painkillers, leading to the deaths of hundreds of tribal members.

‘The Circle’ author Dave Eggers thinks the internet is getting creepier

Apr 25, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Robert Garrova

There's a movie opening this weekend that's going to strike a little too close to home for some people in this crazy, mixed-up, always-connected digital economy we live in.

Tom Hanks and Emma Watson star in “The Circle,” a story about the dark side of revealing all online. It's based on a book of the same name by Dave Eggers, in which a mega-tech company wants access to all of our lives.

Run government as a business? Americans are split

Apr 25, 2017
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Sabri Ben-Achour

The latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll asked Americans whether they thought the U.S. government should be run more like a business. We ask because President Trump on many occasions promised to do so and to bring his business acumen to bear on the presidency.

This is something Americans have argued over for more than 100 years.

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