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Back in 2012, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's campaign suffered a blow when a tape was leaked of him grousing that 47 percent of Americans don't pay federal income tax. It was one of the biggest gaffes of the presidential campaign, but a new poll conducted by Ipsos for NPR suggests that many Americans forgot it.

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Annie Baxter

Seventy percent of cocoa comes from West Africa, mostly Ivory Coast and Ghana. The supply can swing way up or down depending on political instability and the weather there. 

“At times coca prices' annualized volatility can be as much as 20 to 25 percent,” said James Butterfill, head of research and investments with ETF Securities. 

This year, favorable weather in Ivory Coast is contributing to a surplus, and prices have fallen steeply. That forced the government to lower the price it guarantees cocoa farmers.

LA homeless survey helps service groups plan and budget

Apr 17, 2017
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Catherine Green

Larry Dunn was standing on a corner in Skid Row, the iconic neighborhood of downtown Los Angeles that’s home to thousands of homeless people, including Dunn. He was being interviewed for Los Angeles County’s annual homeless count.

“So you’re a young man, huh?” the surveyor asked him.

“Sixty-three,” he replied. “Younger than you, and you, and you, and you and you.”

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Marketplace

Reports indicate that FCC Chairman Ajit Pai wants to change Obama-era internet rules by having service providers regulate themselves. Michael Beckerman, CEO of the Internet Association, joins us to discuss why he thinks the existing rules are important for consumers. Afterwards, we'll look at the war for autonomous car talent, which has led to lawsuits, talent poaching and absurd salaries.

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Marketplace

Cybersecurity experts are combing through data released by hackers who claim to have infiltrated the National Security Agency. The info makes it look like the NSA hacked into financial service providers in the Middle East. We'll delve into how the security community is responding to the leak. Afterwards, , we'll examine how much of a threat the growing live-streaming TV business poses to Netflix. And finally, we'll chat with Congressman Ro Khanna about his book "Entrepreneurial Nation," which looks at why manufacturing is still important in American society. 

 

During his first day on the job, Alex Perry learned one of the pitfalls of cat grooming when he was bitten by a Maine Coon.

"This one decided to bite me right in the gut. I made the mistake of pulling away. And I got a big tear right in my belly," Perry recalls of that day back in 2012.

If you're a cat lover, chances are you know what a Maine Coon is. Commonly referred to as "the gentle giant," the Maine Coon is one of the largest and most social domesticated cats.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Activists took to the streets in Washington, D.C., and several other cities Saturday — the traditional Tax Day (which officially falls on April 18 this year) — to try to pressure the president to release his tax returns. Liberal protests are fast becoming a fixture of Donald Trump's presidency.

When Forbes first listed the 400 richest Americans in 1982, there were 13 billionaires on that list.

Today, every single person on the Forbes 400 list is a billionaire.

Many have become philanthropists, and they are reshaping public policy, and society, as they see fit. And because of their numbers, they have far more influence than the philanthropists of the past, argues David Callahan, author of a new book on philanthropy, The Givers: Wealth, Power and Philanthropy in a New Gilded Age.

What will our dinners look like when temperatures and sea levels rise and water floods our coastal towns and cities?

Allie Wist, 29, an associate art director at Saveur magazine, attempts to answer that question in her latest art project, "Flooded." It's a fictional photo essay (based on real scientific data) about a dinner party menu at a time when climate change has significantly altered our diets.

Your federal income taxes are due April 18 this year, and — for perhaps several million people — a fine for failing to get health insurance is due that day, too.

Despite a lengthy debate, Congress has not yet acted on a bill to repeal portions of the Affordable Care Act. That means the law and almost all of its regulations remain in force, at least for now.

United Airlines crew members will no longer be able to bump a passenger who is already seated in one of the airline's planes.

The policy change was first reported by TMZ. A spokesperson for the airline confirms that United has updated its policy "to make sure crews traveling on our aircraft are booked at least 60 minutes prior to departure. This ensures situations like Flight 3411 never happen again."

The politics of respectability, that elusive set of guidelines that dictate how racialized Americans ought to conduct themselves in public, were complicated this week when a 69-year-old Asian-American doctor was forcibly dragged off a United Airlines flight.

The video of Dr. David Dao's body being hauled off the plane provoked international outrage, especially from Asian-Americans, but some argued that race had nothing to do with the incident — that the same level of outrage would have followed regardless of the passenger's race.

Two questions immediately come to my mind.

Cayla, the connected doll, is a spy and must be destroyed

Apr 14, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

Sitting on a shelf in a store, Cayla looks like a typical doll. Her hair is blond. Her eyes are blue. Her mouth is smiling. Once purchased, Cayla is supposed to be your child’s friend, a trusty doll companion. Except Cayla is not just any doll. Cayla is “connected,” allowing parents to listen in on their children via Bluetooth microphone and an app.

The problem? Parents might not be the only ones privy to those conversations.

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