Economy & Business

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The Trump hotel: gold, glitz and lawsuits

Jul 20, 2017
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

When it comes to President Trump's business dealings, there are still a lot of unanswered questions, including whether the president is breaking the law — and violating something known as the emoluments clause — by receiving payments from foreign governments. Not directly, but by way of their business at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., which opened last year on the historic site of the Old Post Office and is still operated by Trump's company. And that's not the only headache the flashy new hotel is causing.

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Gigi Douban

If you’re driving around West Jefferson. Ala. looking for a place to eat, you won’t find much. The Alabama Rose, a restaurant that pops up on a phone search, actually burned down a few years ago. But it’s still where 78-year-old Arthur Graves lives.

07/20/2017: On to the next

Jul 20, 2017
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Marketplace

While the Senate keeps on trying to figure out what it's gonna do about health care, there are plenty of other economic policy problems to deal with. The next big project on the table is tax reform. We take a look at how that debate is shaping up. Also on today's show: What do gold, glitz and lawsuits have in common? The Trump International Hotel. Plus, we talk to Clint Rainey from Bloomberg Businessweek about America’s cheese surplus and the "mad cheese scientists" who are trying to solve it. That's right, cheese scientists. 

 

07/20/2017: The line between free speech and propaganda

Jul 20, 2017

In Paris, 25 senior economists and public officials from about two dozen countries recently met behind closed doors to talk about how the world economy is doing. One of them: Diane Swonk from DS Economics. She shared some good news (the rest of the world seems to be doing better) and bad news (these gains have caused negative undercurrents in political elections).  Afterwards, we'll look at how companies are trying to find allow free speech, while blocking propaganda from terrorist organizations like ISIS at the same time.

The cost of repealing — but not replacing — Obamacare

Jul 20, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Eliza Mills

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released its calculation of the costs and benefits if Congress repeals the federal health care law, but doesn't replace it. About 32 million people would be uninsured by 2026 and premiums would double. On the other hand, the federal deficit would drop by $473 billion. 

Marketplace's Dan Gorenstein joined us to talk about the possibility of another repeal-and-replace plan in the cards and the future of Medicaid. Below is an edited transcript.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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What opportunities are there for a coal-mining community after its main industry has waned?

In Somerset County in southwestern Pennsylvania, that's not an easy question to answer. For this county of roughly 76,000 residents, renewable energy and health care offer hopes for its future. But first it has to attract qualified workers.

Visa is set to report third-quarter earnings today after market close and all signs are pointing to good news. The company’s investment in digital platforms is contributing to growth. Visa Checkout, for one, has more than 20 million enrolled accounts and other initiatives are expanding globally. But they’re not the only digital pay app in the game. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Uber’s whole value proposition is that it’s cheaper, quicker and easier. But this week the ride-sharing service was accused of being not so easy for people who are disabled. The group Disability Rights Advocates, filed a class-action lawsuit against Uber. The suit argues the company discriminates against New York City riders with disabilities because it doesn’t offer enough wheel-chair accessible vehicles. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

07/20/2017: A new way of cleaning your house

Jul 20, 2017
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Marketplace

They may not be the most anticipated items in the world, but transparency reports are important because they reveal how companies disclose information about the way they deal with the U.S. government. On today's show, we'll talk with Michee Smith, a product manager at Google, about the changes the company is making to its report. Afterwards, we'll look at the model behind Up & Go, a service that connects those in New York City who need cleaning services with small business owners.

07/20/2017: Repealing Obamacare, by the numbers

Jul 20, 2017
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Marketplace

The Congressional Budget Office has calculated the costs and benefits of repealing Obamacare, but not replacing it. An estimated 32 million people would be left uninsured. On today's show we'll take a look at what the release of these figures mean for the GOP's health care strategy. Afterwards, we'll talk with APM Reports about the Trump administration's infrastructure plans, and then discuss a class-action lawsuit filed by the Disability Rights Advocates against Uber over wheelchair-accessible vehicles.

The BBC has released salary information for its on-air talent for the first time, igniting simultaneous debates over the size, and the fairness, of the salaries — particularly over a conspicuous gender gap.

The public broadcaster has always included executive salaries in its annual report*. But this year, the government required the public broadcaster to reveal what the highest-paying presenters and actors make, too.

The resulting list includes approximate salary ranges for all 96 radio and TV staff making more than $195,000 a year.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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California's Obamacare exchange scrubbed its annual rate announcement this week, the latest sign of how the ongoing political drama over the Affordable Care Act is roiling insurance markets nationwide.

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