Education

On the second floor of Morgan State University's engineering building, Jacob Walker, 12, is putting the finishing touches on a ruler he's just created.

Not yet an actual ruler. One he's designing on the computer. He just needs to add his initials — then it's time to produce it on a 3-D printer.

Jacob starts seventh grade in the fall and has big dreams. Building this ruler is all part of the plan.

"When I was a child," he says, "I loved to play with Legos, and it inspired me to be an engineer when I get older."

The Plan To Give Pell Grants To Prisoners

Jul 31, 2015

Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch made a rare joint appearance on Friday — in prison.

They visited a state-run facility in Jessup, Md., to announce a new plan meant to help some of the 700,000 inmates who are released each year.

It's a pilot program to give prisoners access to federal Pell Grants that would pay for college classes behind bars.

"The cost-benefit of this does not take a math genius to figure out," Duncan said. "We lock folks up here, $35-40,000 every single year. A Pell Grant is less than $6,000 each year."

One day before a district court ruling was to go into effect that would force the NCAA to allow colleges to pay student-athletes $5,000 per year, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has placed a stay on that order.

The Obama administration Friday is taking a small step toward expanding adult prisoners' access to federal Pell grants. The money would help pay for college-level classes behind bars.

True, I never basked in the glow of the high school stage. But I have fond memories of working behind the scenes, as stage crew. Dressed in black, I rushed the bed onstage for Tevye's dream sequence in Fiddler on the Roof.

I've also spoken with many people who weren't involved in theater at all but can still — for some reason — remember the shows their schools performed.

There's just something about the high school stage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In a world of iPads, smartphones, the internet, social media and all of the traditional communication tools like books, newspapers, broadcasts, cable and magazines, we are all flooded with information.

While it informs, entertains and occupies us, it can also overwhelm us. How do we manage all of the data streaming into our lives?

Host Tom Luljak explores this topic with the new dean of the UWM School of Information Studies, Tomas Lipinski.

It's an old and controversial question: Should federal Pell grants be used to help prisoners pay for college?

Tomorrow, at a prison in Jessup, Md., Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch are expected to unveil a program to do just that. The new plan would create a limited pilot program allowing some students in prison to use Pell grants to pay for college classes.

The key word there is "limited" — because there's only so much the administration can do. To understand why, we have to go back to November 1993.

UWM

The money will establish a Lubar Center for Entrepreneurship at UWM, on the corner of Kenwood Blvd. and Maryland Ave.  According to UWM Chancellor Mark Mone, the Lubar Center will house many of UWM's programs that prepare students to be entrepreneurs and innovators, and it will assist start-up local companies that are striving to bring more services and products to market.

"Wisconsin has fallen behind other states in creating new jobs and launching startup companies... bolstering this kind of entrepreneurial ecosystem is vital to a healthy economy and job creation,” Mone said.

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