Education

Harvard University reported that its endowment fund saw a loss of 2 percent, or $1.9 billion, on its investments for fiscal 2016. It's the single largest annual decline since the financial crisis.

Rachel Morello

The school year was about to begin a few weeks ago, then it abruptly ended for scores of students at ITT Technical Institute. The for-profit college system announced it was closing its campuses nation-wide, including two in Wisconsin, after numerous states accused ITT of fraud.

Ruling on a lawsuit filed by a state's Democratic attorney general against its Republican governor, the Kentucky Supreme Court says Gov. Matt Bevin doesn't have the authority to unilaterally slice money out of a state university's budget.

From member station WUKY in Lexington:

Jon Strelecki

With more veterans on our campus than any other university in our six state region, UW-Milwaukee has a long history of providing a strong support system for those women and men who have served our country and now are continuing their education.

But, still, some vets continue to deal with the emotional and psychological effects of being at war. To help them work through their issues, the UWM Theater department has embarked on a unique program of live performances the vets themselves star in. And Shakespeare is part of the equation.

Much of the anger and anxiety in the 2016 election are fueled by the sense that economic opportunity is slipping away for many Americans. This week, as part of NPR's collaborative project with member stations, A Nation Engaged, we're asking the question: What can be done to create economic opportunity for more Americans?

45 CFR Chapter XIII RIN 0970-AC63.

That's the official name of the newly-revised government standards for running a Head Start program.

If the name doesn't grab you, this should: The Department of Health and Human Services says it's the first "comprehensive" revision of Head Start rules since they first published them in 1975. And the changes are, in a word, big.

About one in five children in the United States shows signs of a mental health disorder — anything from ADHD to eating disorders to suicide.

And yet, as we've been reporting this month, many schools aren't prepared to work with these students. Often, there's been too little training in recognizing the problems, the staff who are trained are overworked, and there just isn't enough money.

Oh, middle school. The land of pantsing. Mean girls who won't let you sit with them in the cafeteria. And, these days, cryptic taunts posted on social media, where parents and teachers can't always see them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The relationship between the U.S. and China these days is fraught with political tensions. But both countries are committed to sending more of their young people to study language and culture in each other's countries — and a component of that is sending more U.S. minority students to China.

That's both to provide more students of color with the opportunity to study overseas, and to create a student body abroad that is more representative of U.S. diversity.

According to China's education ministry, 21,975 American students studied in China in 2015.

Ian grew up in Milwaukee, in an African-American family with five kids where the annual income was just $25,000. He was involved in sports and after-school activities, and spent a year working after high school to save up for college. He saw himself as a role model in his community: "They see me going to college and are like, 'Oh, he's doing something positive, he's breaking through the ceiling.' "

Note: This episode originally aired in October 2014.

Listeners have been asking for years why textbooks are getting so expensive. Prices of new textbooks have been going up faster than clothing, food, cars, and even healthcare. On today's show we found out why prices won't stop rising.

This story is part of our NPR Ed series on mental health in schools.

In the waning days of summer vacation, Sydney and Laney are enjoying their final moments of freedom flipping over a high bar at a playground close by their house in Spartanburg, S.C.

"You've got to pull your hips into the bar," says their mom, Selena, motioning to the girls, "you've got to kick up like that!"

"I tried to kick!" Laney says indignantly. "I did this – you told me not to stick out!"

News that late librarian Robert Morin left the University of New Hampshire $4 million has been hailed as a symbol of Morin's dedication and generosity. But the school's decision to spend $1 million of that money on a new video scoreboard for the football stadium is being criticized.

Jon Strelecki

One sign of the direction a city is headed is the number of cranes at work in the downtown area. In Milwaukee, that number is quickly growing as literally billions of dollars of new construction is either underway or about to get started.

And behind every one of those cranes is an architect...the person who imagines the design and develops the detailed plans for a new building.

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