Education

Jobs Outlook Is Brighter For Class Of 2013

Jun 5, 2013

For the last five years, graduation day has been as much a time for apprehension as for celebration.

Even now, with the Great Recession over, many recent graduates are still struggling to turn their high school and college diplomas into tickets for a better life. The unemployment rate for Americans under age 25 remains more than double the overall rate of 7.5 percent.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The president of one of the biggest universities in the country, Ohio State, has announced his retirement. This comes a week after a recording surfaced of unfortunate comments about Catholics and Southerners. Karen Kasler, of Ohio Public Radio in Columbus, reports.

For the past five years, graduation day has been a time of apprehension as much as celebration. Prospects for those entering the workforce for the first time were bleak. The class of 2013 — whether from high school or college — has cause for more optimism than previous classes.

Ohio State University president Gordon Gee will retire on July 1, ending his leadership of the school that was recently embarrassed by his verbal miscues. Gee, 69, recently sparked anger with comments he made about Catholics and rival universities.

Gee made those comments, reportedly intended as jokes, at a session of Ohio State's Athletic Council.

The Students Who Keep Teachers Inspired

Jun 3, 2013
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro.

Why Some Schools Want To Expel Suspensions

Jun 2, 2013

The effectiveness of school suspensions is up for debate. California is the most recent battleground, but a pattern of uneven application and negative outcomes is apparent across the country.

It still pays to earn a college degree. That is, if you get the right one. Georgetown University published a report Wednesday that looked into this dilemma.

"The labor market demands more specialization. So, the game has changed," says Anthony Carnevale, the report's co-author and director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.

Carnevale says students probably aren't choosing the right degrees because they haven't been given the right guidance.

Does your local high school have a student newspaper? And in this day when a social media message saying, "Tonight's Green Design and Technology class homework sucks!" can instantly be sent to thousands, does it need to?

The New York Times reports this week that only 1 in 8 of New York's public high schools has a student newspaper — and many of those are published just a few times a year. A few more are online, which can leave out poorer schools.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Milwaukee Public Schools and the Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association released a joint statement Friday, announcing passage of a handbook for MPS employees.

Teacher Feature: Ethnobotanist Tom Carlson

May 31, 2013
Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Joining us now is Flora Lichtman with our Video Pick of the Week. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: We got something really special this week.

President Obama surrounded himself with college students at the White House on Friday and warned that the cost of student loans is about to go up.

Interest rates on government-backed college loans are set to double July 1 — unless Congress agrees on a fix before then. Obama has threatened to veto a House-passed bill that would let the cost of student loans go up and down with the market.

From New Mexico to New York, 10 state university systems have announced they are joining the ranks of elite institutions embracing the massive open online course, or MOOC, system.

On Thursday, they unveiled a landmark partnership with Coursera, a for-profit tech company with 3.5 million registered students. It's the biggest effort to catapult degree-granting institutions into the world of global education.

Jon Strelecki

As our county's population ages, the number of people with dementia continues to rise. On previous editions of UWM Today, we've talked about some of the many challenges facing those who suffer from dementia and those who care for people with the condition.

On today's program, we consider a new aspect of helping those with dementia and Alzheimer's, and it involves something as simple as lowering the level of noise during mealtime in nursing homes.

Ann-Elise Henzl

The Joint Committee on Finance was expected to vote on the school vouchers on Wednesday; however, lawmakers adjourned without taking action on the item.

Pages