Education

When the Obama administration announced last year that it would overhaul the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, prospective college students (and their parents) cheered.

"Today, we're lending a hand to millions of high school students who want to go to college and who've worked hard," said Arne Duncan, who was at that time U.S. secretary of education. "We're announcing an easier, earlier FAFSA."

And it is both.

Rachel Morello

This year, for the first time, a Milwaukee charter school is trying a new system of teaching and learning created by Facebook engineers.

The Silicon Valley-based company worked with Summit Public Schools in California to create Summit Learning, a computer-based model that puts more of the responsibility on students to take charge of their learning.

There's been lots of chatter on social media and among pundits, warning that the treatment of immigrant kids and English language learners is going to "get worse" under a Donald Trump presidency.

Some people on Twitter are even monitoring incidents in which Latino students in particular have been targeted.

But I wonder: When were these students not targeted? When did immigrant students and their families ever have it easy?

We've always been a hands-on, DIY kind of nation. Ben Franklin didn't just invent the lightning rod. His creations include bifocals, swim fins, the catheter, innovative stoves and more.

Franklin, who was largely self-taught, may have been a genius, but he wasn't really an outlier when it comes to American making and tinkering.

Part of our series exploring how the U.S will educate the nearly 5 million students who are learning English.

Children and teenagers of Mexican descent make up one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation's public schools.

Teaching In The Age Of Trump

Nov 11, 2016

When Heather Stewart left home and headed to her third-grade classroom Wednesday morning, she wasn't sure what to do.

"There have been a handful of days in 22 years where I had no idea what to say or how to say it," she tweeted that morning. "Today is one of them."

Jon Strelecki

For nearly 15 years, the LGBT Resource Center on the UW-Milwaukee campus has worked to create a welcoming and safe environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students.

Recently, UWM was named one of the top 30 universities in the country for its LGBTQ-friendly policies and programs.

On this edition of UWM Today, learn more about how UW-Milwaukee has built its reputation for inclusiveness with Jen Murray, the director of the LGBT Resource Center at UWM.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now let's get some election reaction from a group who couldn't actually vote. It is a classroom of sixth-graders. NPR's Eric Westervelt, with our Ed team, spent time with a middle-school class in Northern California.

"Common Core is a total disaster. We can't let it continue."

So said presidential candidate Donald Trump in a campaign ad on his website.

To make sure there's no confusion about where he stands on the learning standards that are now used by the vast majority of states, Trump also tweeted earlier this year:

"Get rid of Common Core — keep education local!"

At 8 a.m. sharp, just hours after Donald Trump was declared president-elect, the hallways at Harrisburg High's SciTech campus were buzzing. There were tears, but also a few subtle nods in approval of the results. But mostly the students expressed their deep desire for Americans here in Pennsylvania and around the country to come together.

The candidates aren't talking much about education. But we are.

Voters are, too — education is rated as one of the top campaign issues this election cycle.

A jury on Monday awarded $3 million to a University of Virginia administrator who was defamed in a Rolling Stone magazine piece about an alleged gang rape on campus.

As the Two-Way has reported, the widely disseminated story soon began to fall apart:

It's been hard to find voices of hope this election season. People seem to feel they're choosing between the lesser of two evils.

Not E.J. Johnson: "This is mostly, one of the mostly, heart-racing thrilling things I've ever done!"

When Patricia Gentile was settling in as the new president of North Shore Community College in Massachusetts — about twenty miles north of Boston — she remembers looking out her window and seeing something strange.

"All of these cars rolling up, and tons of folks getting in and out," Gentile says, thinking about that January day a couple years ago.

"So I asked my assistant, 'What's going on down there?' "

Turns out that's where students were picked up and dropped off, but Gentile wondered why there were just so many cars.

Maybe the smart phone's hegemony makes perfect evolutionary sense: Humans are tapping a deep urge to seek out information. Our ancient food-foraging survival instinct has evolved into an info-foraging obsession; one that prompts many of us today to constantly check our phones and multitask.

Monkey see. Click. Swipe. Reward.

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