Education

After 25 years of teaching, Rick Young won't return to his history classroom this fall.

"This became my home," he says. "This is a unique, special place," talking about Daniel C. Oakes High School, where he has spent his entire career.

It's a small public school outside Denver for students who've struggled with traditional education. For some, it's their third or fourth try at high school — and they know it's probably the last stop. And many, because of teachers like Young, finally find success.

Part of our NPR Ed series on mental health in schools.

Every Monday morning at Harvie Elementary School, in Henrico County, Va., Brett Welch stands outside her office door as kids file in.

"The first thing I'm looking for are the faces," says Welch, a school counselor. She's searching for hints of fear, pain or anger.

"Maybe there was a domestic incident at the house that weekend," says Welch. "That's reality for a lot of our kids."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sergey Nivens / Fotolia

Smartphones are everywhere in our lives today. It often takes an extraordinary set of circumstances for us not to be connected in multiple ways with the wider world, whether we're checking our email on an airplane or surfing the web before shutting off the light and going to sleep.

Every day, thousands of teens attempt suicide in the U.S. — the most extreme outcome for the millions of children in this country who struggle with mental health issues.

As we've reported all week, schools play a key role, along with parents and medical professionals, in identifying children who may be at risk of suicide. And one of the biggest challenges: myths that can cloud their judgment.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Throughout the last academic year, we've followed a group of students who graduated from high school a few years ago in Montgomery County, Md., just outside Washington, D.C. We spent the last year talking with them about their choice of public, private or community college. Was the cost worth it? What is the value of higher education?

HELAINE HICKSON

Summertime on the UW-Milwaukee campus is anything but quiet.

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone discusses advocacy, planning and the welcoming of new students. Also, plans are underway for the 2017/19 budget request.

Georgetown University will be offering an admissions edge to descendants of enslaved people sold to fund the school, officials announced on Thursday.

Jesuit priests connected to the private Catholic university sold 272 enslaved people in 1838, to pay off the university's massive debts. The men, women and children were sold to plantations in Louisiana; the university received the equivalent of $3.3 million, securing its survival.

For nearly a half-century, the professional educators organization Phi Delta Kappa has released a poll this time of year to capture the public's attitudes toward public education.

This year, by far the most lopsided finding in the survey was about a controversial reform policy: school closures. By 84 percent to 14 percent, Americans said that even when a public school has been failing for several years, the best response is to keep the school open and try to improve it rather than shut it down.

Photo courtesy of Mount Mary University

Students and faculty are back on campus at Mount Mary University on Milwaukee’s northwest side. The all-women’s Catholic university has nearly 1,400 students, among them, many students from diverse backgrounds and financially disadvantaged situations.

The school just received a $2.6 million federal grant that aims to make sure some of those students can finish their course of study.

Today, the U.S. Department of Education unveiled new rules, explaining to states and districts how they can prove they're spreading resources fairly between poor and less-poor schools.

Today's release is a re-write of rules that were first unveiled last spring and that caused quite a stir, creating a political unicorn: a fight in which Republicans and teachers unions found themselves on the same side.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Like many schools, Gibson Elementary in St. Louis had big problems with attendance — many students were missing nearly a month of school a year.

So Melody Gunn, who was the principal at Gibson last year, set out to visit homes and figure out why kids weren't showing up. Her biggest discovery? They didn't have clean uniforms to wear to school.

Many families, she found, didn't have washing machines in the home, and kids were embarrassed to show up to school in dirty clothes. The result was that often, they didn't come.

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