Education

If colleges are a hunting ground, as they've been called, for sexual predators, advocates say that high schools are the breeding ground — and that any solution must start there. They say efforts at college are too little, too late.

Mayte Lara Ibarra and Larissa Martinez had just finished their senior year of high school when they each decided to go public with their immigration status. Both Texas students came to the U.S. illegally, and they didn't want to keep that fact a secret any longer.

Ibarra identified herself on Twitter as one of the 65,000 undocumented youth who graduate high school in the U.S. Martinez revealed her status in the commencement speech she delivered at graduation.

Their actions sparked support and pointed criticism. That was more than a month ago.

At first glance, it looks like an ordinary gym class at a public school in Yibin, a city of about a million people in southwest China's Sichuan province.

But then you notice that the students are wearing signs: "Nitrate," "Sulfate," "Phosphate." In their game of tag, they chase the classmates they need to start a chemical reaction.

This is how gym and chemistry classes are combined at the Cold Water Well Middle School. Upstairs, in a combined history and math class, students use statistics to find patterns in the rise and fall of nations.

To be human is to be constantly at war between our lofty goals and our immediate impulses.

Future Me wants me to run five miles. Right Now Me wants a cookie.

Unfortunately, that totally understandable tendency is one factor that can stop people from completing their education:

  • Ninety-three percent of high school seniors say they intend to go to college, but 1 in 10 of those never apply.
  • Between 10 and 15 percent of those who are admitted never register for classes.
WavebreakmediaMicro / Fotolia

With less than one month left until school starts, kids will soon trade in their play-dates for pencils, and get back to the lessons they left for summer vacation.

The big question for teachers: how much review will their students need at first? Educators often wrangle with the "summer slide," varying degrees of academic regression students face upon returning to school, after taking a three-month break from regular daily instruction.

In a post a few weeks back, Tania Lombrozo drew attention to research showing that students using laptops and other digital devices in the college classroom are less likely to perform as well as students not using them.

Seven teenagers stand in the courtyard of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, dressed in costumes and surrounded by onlookers. Some of the characters they play are immediately recognizable — Malcolm X, Albert Einstein — and others don't register until they announce their names.

"We stand before you as a reflection of community," the group announces in unison.

One after another, they speak up: "As reminders of social activists." "Some of us are leaders." "Or presidents." Then, together again: "All of us are citizens."

The field of educational technology is mourning a visionary whose work was considered 50 years ahead of its time.

Jon Strelecki

On this edition of UWM Today, we’re going to talk about a wonderful resource in our community that offers lifelong learning opportunities for people over the age of 50.

It is the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

Although there are more than 100 Osher Institutes across the country, the one here in Milwaukee at UWM is the only one in Wisconsin. And recently the institute received a $1 million gift to support its work.

Jason Stitt / Footolia

Schools will be back in session in just about a month, and for high school students of a certain age, major tests like the SAT and ACT are not far behind.

Some teens may have spent part of their summer already prepping for these tests, which colleges use as one barometer of a student's potential for success. Others start their studying as school begins, while a few have already been studying for years.

You sneak them into backpacks and let them commingle with the video games (hoping some of the latter's appeal will rub off). You lay them around the kids' beds like stepping stones through the Slough of Despond and, for good measure, Vitamix them to an imperceptible pulp for the occasional smoothie.

Books are everywhere in your house, and yet ... they're not being consumed. Because it's summer, and kids have so many other things they'd rather do.

What Makes The Kids Of Congo Run?

Aug 3, 2016

Beatrice Kamuchanga, 19, a humble and soft-spoken girl from the small eastern village of Kirotshe, will represent Congo in the 5,000 meter race this August in the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

But for her, running isn't just about aiming for Olympic glory. "Running gives us the energy to study even when there is not food to eat," she says. "And with God, and as a group, we can continue to succeed together."

At These Museums, Tragedy Is A History Lesson

Aug 3, 2016

Last week, NPR Ed rounded up our favorite children's museums — places dedicated to letting kids learn in kid-friendly exhibits. That got us thinking about a different kind of museum: the ones that teach about the toughest episodes of history. How do you explain what happened during the Sept. 11 attacks to a child? What about the Holocaust, or the Oklahoma City bombing? We asked leaders from three memorial museums around the U.S.

Marti Mikkelson

    

Gov. Walker, who has already capped tuition in the UW System for four years, now says he will extend the freeze for two more. He says he wants to keep tuition affordable. While students at UW-Milwaukee could benefit financially, some don't think the idea is a solid one, at least over the long-term.

Brianna Little, a senior majoring in health care administration at UWM, says she's afraid of what might happen to younger students, if the tuition freeze continues for two-more years.

What do Kyrgyzstan, Vietnam, Albania, Germany and Ethiopia have in common?

Turns out all five countries do better than average when it comes to turning their national wealth into a better life for their citizens.

There's also a list of countries that do worse than average. Spoiler alert: The United States is one of them.

This unusual gauge of national success is the brainchild of analysts at the Boston Consulting Group.

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