Education

We are in the midst of a quiet revolution in school discipline.

In the past five years, 27 states have revised their laws with the intention of reducing suspensions and expulsions. And, more than 50 of America's largest school districts have also reformed their discipline policies — changes which collectively affect more than 6.35 million students.

School districts must give students with disabilities the chance to make meaningful, "appropriately ambitious" progress, the Supreme Court said Wednesday in an 8-0 ruling.

The decision in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District could have far-reaching implications for the 6.5 million students with disabilities in the United States.

This blog post has some pretty useful information. So print it out; get out your highlighter and take off the cap.

Ready? Now throw it away, because highlighters don't really help people learn.

We all want for our kids to have optimal learning experiences and, for ourselves, to stay competitive with lifelong learning. But how well do you think you understand what good learning looks like?

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Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET Thursday

Students throughout Boston are getting a radically different view of the world, one laminated 24-by-36-inch sheet of paper at a time.

Beginning last Thursday, Boston Public Schools administrators have been sending social studies teachers in the second, seventh and 11th grades new maps for their classrooms — depictions that more accurately portray the sizes of Earth's continents.

Richard Termine

Can you tell me how to get to Sesame Street?

Almost anybody with a television and free time afterschool for the last 50 years has become friends with the characters on Sesame Street. About a year ago, Big Bird and the gang said goodbye to Maria, one of the most beloved neighbors on the block since the early 1970s -- and one of the first Hispanic characters on national television.

Fake news has been, well, in the news a lot lately. It seems no claim is too absurd to be aired.

For example, NBA legend Shaquille O'Neal has just become the fourth NBA star to make public remarks that he believes the Earth is flat, not round.

Editors' note Monday, 12:55 p.m. ET: Since this story was first published, we have added material from another former student and former law clerks of Gorsuch, as well as more information about Jennifer Sisk's political affiliations. On Tuesday, Gorsuch disputed the allegation himself during his confirmation hearing and explained the lesson he intended to teach.

National K-12 and higher ed news came fast and furious this week. Here are our highlights to help you keep on top.

The president's "skinny budget" has cuts for education

The biggest story of our week happened early Thursday morning when President Trump released his budget outline, historically known as a "skinny budget" because it has few details.

The U.S. Department of Education came in for a $9 billion, or 13.5 percent, cut.

Jon Strelecki

Throughout this school year, we are celebrating UW-Milwaukee’s 60th anniversary by taking a closer look at each of the 14 schools and colleges that make up Wisconsin’s second largest university. We are more than half way through our review and today our focus is on the School of Information Studies.

With more than 1,000 students, it is ranked one of the top Information Studies programs in the world. Our guest is the Dean of the school, Tom Lipinski.

College Possible/Twitter

There’s a lot of talk coming out of Washington these days, about what will change under the new presidential administration -- immigration, health care and international trade, to name a few. 

But many smaller programs also face imminent change – including domestic projects that rely on federal funds.

This morning President Trump released a proposed 2018 budget that calls for a $9 billion, or 13.5 percent, cut for the U.S. Department of Education.

Updated: 12:04 p.m. ET March 16, 2017

Top supporters of the neighborhood schools bill say it won't receive a vote during this year's legislative session, which ends on March 30. The issue is expected to be discussed during legislative committee hearings in Louisville over the summer.

A couple of months ago, Shan'Taya Cowan got into Harvard.

"I just froze," she remembers. The first word she read was, "Congratulations." "And I didn't know what to do because, it was never really an option for me."

"Millions of poor, disadvantaged students are trapped in failing schools."

So said President Trump at the White House recently. It's a familiar lament across the political spectrum, so much so that you could almost give it its own acronym : PKTIFS (Poor Kids Trapped In Failing Schools).

Where there's no consensus, however, is on the proper remedy for PKTIFS.

The IRS Data Retrieval Tool is down.

If those words don't send a shiver up your spine, it means you're not a high school senior or college student rushing to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

The FAFSA is the form — famously complicated and difficult to finish — that stands between many low-income students and the federal, state and institutional aid they need to pay for college.

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