Environment

Environment
5:30 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Fighting Fire With Fire: Why Some Burns Are Good For Nature

An arborist from the Montana Conservation Corps works to clear pine trees from land in Centennial Valley, Mont.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 1:50 pm

Wildfires were once essential to the American West. Prairies and forests burned regularly, and those fires not only determined the mix of flora and fauna that made up the ecosystem, but they regenerated the land.

When people replaced wilderness with homes and ranches, they aggressively eliminated fire. But now, scientists are trying to bring fire back to the wilderness, to recreate what nature once did on its own.

One place they're doing this is Centennial Valley, in southwestern Montana.

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Environment
5:40 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

Water Contamination Concerns Multiply in Town of Jackson

There seems to be no end to the Town of Jackson's water woes.

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Environment
5:14 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

DNR Expands Drinking Water Advisory in Jackson

More Town of Jackson residents are being told, not to drink their well water, because it's contaminated with benzene.

Last July, a gas pipeline ruptured, with the fuel seeping into the earth and groundwater. Ever since, the owner, West Shore Pipeline Company has taken water samples from both inside and outside the spill zone. The DNR then analyzes them and warns residents if theirs is tainted.

The agency has now expanded its Drinking Water Health Advisory west, to include:

-  homes in the Crosswind Farms subdivision

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Environment
10:45 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Three Bridges Create Park and Sparks of Community

Plants are just beginning to take root as Three Bridges Park opens.

After a decade of collecting buckets of public and private funding, a 24-acre park comes to life in the Menomonee Valley.

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The Two-Way
9:48 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Thirsty? 'Sweat Machine' Turns Perspiration Into Drinking Water

The Sweat Machine was unveiled as part of a UNICEF campaign promoting safe drinking water.
UNICEF

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 10:53 am

Thomas Edison famously said that genius is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration — words that could well apply to a new machine promoted by UNICEF that turns human sweat into drinking water.

The Sweat Machine extracts moisture from worn clothes by spinning and heating them, then filters the resulting liquid so that only pure water remains. It was built by Swedish engineer and TV personality Andreas Hammar, and uses a technology developed by Sweden's Royal Institute of Technology and the water purification company HVR.

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