Environment

Susan Bence

Wisconsin’s U.S. Senate race is blazing full steam ahead after former Governor Tommy Thompson defeated three challengers in Tuesday’s GOP primary.

Both he and Democratic Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin hit the campaign circuit hours later.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence takes an initial look at how environmental issues might play into the race.

Peruse their campaign websites, and you will not find plans for how either candidate would address issues such as global warming or storm water contamination.

Susan Bence

Dignitaries including Governor Walker tramped the grounds Monday of what is becoming home to the Milwaukee Water Council.

The gathering officially launched the renovation of a seven-story warehouse in the Walker’s Point neighborhood.

Susan Bence

A collection of area artists, environmentalists and spiritualists are about to undertake an experiment. They plan to bring together a varied group of individuals, provide a stimulating blend of “close encounters” with nature, history, culture and ecology, and see what happens. That’s the premise of the New Wind Folk School – a weeklong program sponsored by the Greater Milwaukee Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Susan Bence

Hundreds of people jammed a community Tuesday night in the town of Jackson.

Its residents want to know how the pipeline company is going to handle the well water and health concerns that have erupted after a gasoline line ruptured in the community northwest of Milwaukee.

Susan Bence

We’ve been revisiting a series on entrepreneurship this week on Lake Effect. WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence wasn’t setting out to do a story on entrepreneurship when she left for the north woods in April – she was planning to do a story on the debate over a proposed iron ore mine. But while she was in Ashland, she found herself introduced to the creator of a company that fills a unique niche in – of all things - the feminine hygiene realm.

Susan Bence

Last spring, Governor Walker signed a new wetlands bill into law.

Supporters consider it a “job creator” because it allows developers to build on wetlands, as long as they create a substitute somewhere else.

Although the law took effect on July 1, the DNR is gradually implementing the provisions.

Tuesday, the agency will hold an informational hearing on the new “general” permit, designed to accommodate small projects.

In the past, Wisconsin asked developers to minimize harm to wetlands and mitigate any damaged caused.

UWM

UW-Milwaukee has taken another step towards increasing the region's prominence as a center for freshwater research. Jenny Kehl started work earlier this month as the new Lynde B. Uihlein Endowed Chair in Water Policy and the director of the Center for Water Policy in the School of Freshwater Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Susan Bence

The Milwaukee County Board could advance talks Thursday about replacing the downtown transit center with a 44-story hotel and apartment complex.

The property is located just steps from Discovery World and Lake Michigan.

A local developer is interested in building a high rise there and a number of local leaders are onboard.

However, a parks and public land preservation group questions whether the plot is off-limits to private development because of a clause in Wisconsin’s Constitution.

Eddee Daniel

A group of historic preservationists and environmentalists will gather tonight at the Wauwatosa Public Library for what organizers hope will be a lively discussion. The central theme is the fate of the Eschweiler Buildings – four magnificent but crumbling structures that reside on the Milwaukee County Grounds. They occupy a large sweep of open space northeast of what is an otherwise congested Hwy 45 and Watertown Plank Road intersection.

Environmental Forecast

Jul 20, 2012

Past generations poured sewage, trash and industrial chemicals into the Milwaukee River.

Most of the direct dumping has ended, but as WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence reports, run-off from the land continues to choke the river, as do occasional sewer overflows.

Wisconsin DNR

The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board voted unanimously yesterday afternoon to adopt the DNR’s recommendations for Wisconsin’s first wolf hunt. The rules the Board set down include a kill quota of 201 wolves, which were recently delisted from Endangered Species Act. The hunt will run from October to February.

The hunt has been controversial enough that more than a hundred people jammed the hearing room in Stevens Point where the Board was meeting, and some 40-plus people testified during the hearing.

The grey wolf is in Wisconsin’s spotlight.

Shortly after the federal government removed the animal from the endangered species list, the state created a wolf hunt to begin this October.

With little time to spare, the DNR designed rules for the first season.

The agency is proposing a harvest of 201 wolves, with some zones more heavily targeted than others.

Tuesday the seven-member Natural Resources Board will vote on the DNR’s proposed rules at a special meeting in Stevens Point.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence looks at the polarizing positions the wolf – and its upcoming hunt – are raising.

The City of Milwaukee has joined a club of which no community wants to be a member.

Late last week, officials announced that the Emerald ash borer has infected trees on the city’s northwest side.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence met a city forester on the site to learn how Milwaukee has been preparing for the pest.

It has already taken down tens of millions of trees in states to our east as well as in Canada.

It was not entirely “unexpected” news Friday when Milwaukee officials announced conclusively - the Emerald ash borer hit a cluster of trees on the northwest side.

Scientists first spotted the destructive green beetle in Detroit, Michigan in 2002.

President Obama last week signed the transportation bill he hopes will put thousands of construction workers on job sites.

The law also carries some unexpected “environmental” clout.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence learned more about what SOME are calling “The Asian Carp Act.”

Pages