Environment

According to a We Energies spokesman, the utility is in the early stages of determining whether its Valley Power Plant will be converted to natural gas burning from coal. Currently We Energies is carrying out a feasibility study, after which it must submit an application to the state’s Public Service Commission.

Susan Bence is WUWM's environmental reporter. She spoke Cleaner Valley Coaltion members Virginia Zerpa and Cheryl Nenn about the plan.

Wormy Work

Apr 22, 2011
Susan Bence

We mark Earth Day with a profile of a vermicomposter from Wauwatosa. WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence spoke with Wauwatosa resident Heather Zydek. An Earth Day celebration will be held today at the Harley Davidson Museum. Learn about the beginnings of Earth Day.

Today is Earth Day. What’s become an international event, was the brainchild of the late Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin. Over the years, the U.S. Senator inspired millions of people around the world to address dangers threatening the environment.

Jean Clausen has found inspiration in the world around her. The 95-year-old nature writer helped save the “once endangered” bald eagles that now thrive on the Wisconsin River. world to address dangers threatening the environment.

WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence motored up to her riverbank cottage, 30 miles northwest of Madison. She caught Clausen in the middle of intense bird watching, and chronicling. world to address dangers threatening the environment.

Jean Clausen is excited! She just spotted a small woodpecker - a yellow-bellied sapsucker - feasting at one of her many feeders. world to address dangers threatening the environment.

Our environmental reporter Susan Bence rolls up to a budding Milwaukee recycling business. Be it Berber, Persian or shag, the carpet recycler helps keep it out of the landfill.

WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence spoke with Susan Flader and Curt Meine, Aldo Leopold scholars featured in the documentary “Green Fire” that’s been shown tonight in Milwaukee. The film is slated to air on public television in 2012.

Susan Bence is WUWM’s environmental reporter. She produced our piece on the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison. The NWHC is where the leading work on White-Nose Syndrome in bats is taking place.

On this Valentine’s Day, we take a look at a business that’s rooted in love - and diapers. Susan Bence is WUWM’s environmental reporter. She was curious to find out just how colorful Catherine Bolden’s “Sprout Change” diapers are.

From Birdies to Birds

Dec 7, 2010

WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence takes us to a former golf course where water is no longer a hazard. There’s more information on the Forest Beach Migratory Preserve and the Ozaukee Washington Land Trust.

There’s a national movement afoot to grow more food in cities.

And the Milwaukee area stands out as an urban agricultural hotbed, as raised gardens multiply in backyards, empty lots and community spaces. Another promising piece of urban food production is called “aquaponics”.

They’re systems that combine fish and produce.

On this final day of our Project Milwaukee series on the local food economy, Environmental Reporter Susan Bence introduces us to local innovators using this fishy model to inspire future leaders.

Organic Farming Factor

Nov 16, 2010

Wisconsin is second only to California, in the number of organic farms operating in the state.

The numbers, though, are still fairly low.

Of Wisconsin’s 78,000 farms, less than two percent are managed organically.

As we continue Project Milwaukee: What’s on Our Plate?” WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence digs a little deeper into the variety and spirit among the state’s organic farmers.

We travel to Organic Valley to learn how supporting family farms and committing to organic practices made this Wisconsin company very successful – and a national role model. WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence takes us there for our Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? series, and we hear from reporter Joanne Weintraub, who wrote about Organic Valley in the current issue of Milwaukee Magazine.

Today is Earth Day. Wisconsin’s own Senator Gaylord Nelson came up with the idea 40 years ago, to call attention to dangers threatening the environment. The U.S. Senator hoped to inspire awareness and action. On this 40th anniversary, we stop by several schools, in search of future environmentalists.

It’s a Saturday, but a dozen or so Whitefish Bay High students are digging their hearts out on the west side of school. They’re installing a series of raised vegetable beds – some for the school, others for the community.

I’ll step aside and let senior Micah Leinbach explain.

Dairy farming has been a part of Wisconsin’s landscape for generations. A small fraction of those operations is organic. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited a couple committed to organic farming and to passing on their methods to the next generation.

This is the sound of 140 happy cows grazing a few miles outside Elkhorn, Wisconsin.

A few months ago WUWM News met three Milwaukee entrepreneurs who set their sights high. They hope to create a commercial aquaculture business in an old factory building in Bay View. The idea is to raise, and then sell, thousands of fish, using a natural filtering system that grows edible plants along the way. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited Sweet Water Organics to see how the business is coming along.

This is a space transformed.

Starting today, WUWM will provide stories on a regular basis, about environmental issues. We begin by meeting the person whose work led to the creation of UWM’s Great Lakes WATER Institute that sits along the shore of Lake Michigan in Milwaukee. WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence introduces us to the man who’s considered by some to be the father of Great Lakes studies.

Dr. Clifford Mortimer is nearly a century old, but he’s not the least bit interested in slowing down.

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