Environment

Editor's note: A version of this story ran in April 2014.

Yes, it is true that gardening requires patience.

But face it, we live in an impatient world. And gardeners everywhere were depressed by the brutal and endless winter.

So we are understandably eager to get sowing. And to see results by ... well, if not next Thursday, then maybe mid-May?

EDDEE DANIEL

Dr. Marc Gorelick didn’t set out to make an environmental statement. He simply wants to set aside a few acres of green space for sick kids to find peace and quiet. 

Those acres just happen to be part of a contested piece of the Milwaukee County Grounds.

People have rallied behind different causes erupting around the public land.

At the Gulf State Park Pier in Orange Beach, Ala., Wetzel Wood casts his fishing line into the rough surf of the Gulf of Mexico. He pulls his bait, a cigar minnow, through the water just beyond where the waves break for the shore.

"On a good day you'd catch king mackerel, Spanish mackerel," he says. Wood first learned to fish at the pier with his grandfather in 1969. "I've seen a lot of different things out here. It's been wonderful."

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Tomorrow is Earth Day, marked on April 22 since 1970. And President Obama will spend part of Earth Day in Everglades National Park talking about the threat of climate change. He gave a preview in his weekly address on Saturday.

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Southwest Airlines created the Heart of the Community program to "activate public spaces in the heart of communities." 

Palm oil is in everything, from pizza dough and chocolate to laundry detergent and lipstick. Nongovernmental organizations blame it for contributing to assorted evils, from global warming to human rights abuses.

But in the past year, this complex global industry has changed, as consumers put pressure on producers to show that they're not destroying forests, killing rare animals, grabbing land or exploiting workers.

In the Pacific Northwest, the U.S. Forest Service is set to open more than 80,000 acres for potential geothermal power development. Companies would then be able to apply for permits to build power plants that would harness the heat beneath the surface to spin turbines and generate electricity.

All of this would be taking place in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Washington state.

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