Health & Science

Scientists have been tinkering with the DNA in humans and other living things for decades. But one thing has long been considered off-limits: modifying human DNA in any way that could be passed down for generations.

If you're lucky enough to be in the path of totality for the Aug. 21 solar eclipse over North America, you will get at best about 2 ½ minutes to view "totality" – when the moon almost completely covers the disc of the Sun.

When someone posts a photo of food on social media, do you get cranky? Is it because you just don't care what other people are eating? Or is it because they're enjoying an herb-and-garlic crusted halibut at a seaside restaurant while you sit at your computer with a slice of two-day-old pizza?

Maybe you'd like to have what they're having, but don't know how to make it. If only there were a way to get their recipe without commenting on the photo.

One of the world's most popular police departments on Twitter and Facebook is in Bangalore, India.

And it's all because they took the risk of partnering up with a hip outside consultant.

If you've ever dreamed of the good life on one of Maine's coastal islands, be forewarned: jobs are few, mainly in lobstering, boat-building and ... caretaking summer residences. And if you're thinking "no problem, I can telecommute!" — think again, because internet access on the islands ranges from lousy to nonexistent.

Islanders struggling to maintain year 'round communities say that's a big problem. But now some Maine lobstermen and would-be telecommuters are banding together to pay for costly new infrastructure they hope will help preserve a threatened way of life.

It was a rocky start for passengers flying British Airways out of two of London's major hubs Wednesday morning as they attempted to check in for their flights.

Travelers at Heathrow and Gatwick airports were met by long lines and scenes described as "chaotic," thanks to an information technology-related check-in system problem.

Passengers had to be checked in manually, said the BBC.

Frustrated would-be flyers took to Twitter to air their grievances.

Many Avoid End-Of-Life Care Planning, Study Finds

Aug 2, 2017

Before being deployed overseas for the Iraq war in 2003, Army reservist Don Morrison filled out military forms that gave instructions about where to send his body and possessions if he were killed.

"I thought, 'Wow, this is mortality right in your face,'" Morrison, now 70, recalls.

After that, his attention was keenly focused on how things might end badly. Morrison asked his lawyer to draw up an advance directive to describe what medical care he wanted if he were unable to make his own decisions.

There is comfort in distance, especially when the distance is in time.

Things that will happen far in the future seem not to bother us much, given that we will, most likely, be out of the picture.

For months now, the GOP push to replace the Affordable Care Act has consumed Washington.

Still, for many consumers, the top concern has been the rising cost of prescription drugs. And that brings us to the topic of pharmacy benefit managers.

PBMs, as they're known, are not well understood and often go unnoticed.

Given how important they are to the prescription drug pricing pipeline, we wanted to remedy that.

A White House commission released a report this week on America's opioid crisis with an urgent recommendation — that President Trump declare it a national emergency.

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

A federal judge in Alabama has struck down portions of a state abortion law, saying they are unconstitutional. Under the law, unique to Alabama, a minor who didn't have parental consent for an abortion could have faced a legal proceeding involving her parents, the district attorney and a person representing the fetus.

The women used to be so nervous about playing wheelchair basketball in public that they had opaque screens erected to conceal the court.

Now their faces are being splashed across media outlets in Afghanistan.

On Sunday, Afghanistan's national women's wheelchair basketball team won its first championship at the 4th annual Bali Cup International Tournament in Indonesia. It played against women's teams from India, Indonesia and Thailand, beating Thailand 65-25 in the final match.

New Yorker staff writer Ariel Levy was five months pregnant when she went to Mongolia on assignment. Her doctor had cleared her for travel, and she was excited to pursue one last adventurous story before settling down with an infant.

But things didn't go as planned: Alone in her hotel room, Levy suffered a placental abruption; her baby boy lived for only 10 minutes. Afterward, Levy was haunted by the notion that she had caused her child's death:

"It's a terrible feeling ... that you made this life and failed to bring it through," she says.

Drug Puts A $750,000 'Price Tag On Life'

Aug 1, 2017

Jana Gundy and Amanda Chaffin, who live within two hours of each other in Oklahoma, each have a child with the same devastating disease.

The genetic condition, spinal muscular atrophy, robs its sufferers of muscle strength, affecting their ability to sit, stand or even breathe.

So both moms were ecstatic when the Food and Drug Administration approved the first treatment for the condition two days before Christmas in 2016. It seemed the gift they had been waiting for — a chance to slow the heartbreaking decline of their young sons.

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