Health & Science

Wisconsin is now observing daylight savings time. Residents of most states lost an hour of sleep when time “sprang forward” over the weekend.

In 10 months, the Affordable Care Act moves into full force.

Kenneth Munson, regional director of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, says starting in October, Wisconsin residents can enroll in the state’s health insurance exchange or marketplace. Gov. Walker opted not to create it, so the federal government is doing the job.

Peter Jakubwski, courtesy of UWM

Both public health and private campaign efforts have aimed at reducing the number of infant deaths in Milwaukee due to co-sleeping. But the problem hasn’t gone away – babies still die, and research by UW-Milwaukee nursing professor Jennifer Doering indicates at least a quarter of the women she studies are still co-sleeping with their infants.

WUWM has been reporting on the impact of gunshot injuries. Bullets wound hundreds of people in Milwaukee every year, and change their lives. Ann-Elise Henzl focuses on the youngest victims: the children shot.

Ann-Elise Henzl

This week, as national leaders consider ways to reduce gun violence, we’re reporting on the hundreds of people in Milwaukee living with gunshot injuries.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl talked to three men with spinal cord injuries, about how a bullet changed their lives.

Thanks to improvements in medical care, more victims recover from gunshot wounds, which once might have been fatal.

However, the growing survival rate does not tell the full story about victims’ experiences. Some face significant physical and emotional damage.

Ann-Elise Henzl

It seems several times each month, Milwaukee mourns people who have been shot to death.

Last year in the city, gunfire killed 72.

Argonne National Library

A lot has been written about the effort to attract more women and people of color to what's known as the "STEM" fields - science, technology, engineering, and math. Leaders in all of those fields have spoken of the need to have a future workforce that better reflects the demographics of this country. But where do we actually stand in attracting students to STEM education?

Secrets to Preventing Back and Neck Pain

Dec 4, 2012

Sit up straight. Don't slouch. Lift with your knees, not with your back.

We've all heard these tips to avoid wrenching our backs, but given the pervasiveness of chronic back pain among Americans, we clearly aren't following these instructions.

Gov. Walker
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gov. Scott Walker announced Friday that Wisconsin will not create its own health insurance exchange, as part of the federal Affordable Care Act. Walker says he will leave the responsibility to the federal government.

Update: Gov. Walker announces that Wisconsin will not create its own health insurance exchange.

Gov. Scott Walker has until Friday Nov. 16 to announce whether Wisconsin will create its own health care exchange under the Affordable Care Act. If the state refuses, the federal government will create Wisconsin's exchange.

StateHealthFacts.org

Governor Walker will announce his decision Friday, as to whether Wisconsin will create a state-run health insurance exchange or rely on the federal government to develop a plan.

WUWM inquired about Kentucky’s plan – that state is months ahead in planning its exchange.

While Wisconsin remains among the states yet to take formal steps toward creating a health care exchange, Chris Murray, a lecturer at Marquette University's Les Aspin Center for Government in Washington, describes opposition to the Affordable Care Act as waning.

Although the U.S. Supreme Court upheld it this year, the fate of the president’s health care overhaul was uncertain until the election. Governors, such as Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, put off implementing portions of the Affordable Care Act until after the vote, hoping the law would fall, if the president did. However, despite Obama’s victory last week, Gov. Walker has not yet made public his plans for meeting a key demand of the law. As WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl reports, interested parties are waiting, as a deadline approaches.

Today is the last day of October. It's also the last day of what has been labeled "Pinktober," the observance of Breast Cancer Awareness month. For Lake Effect essayist and breast cancer survivor Pam Parker, it's a day that can't come soon enough. Parker is a writer, blogger, and breast cancer survivor who lives in Wauwatosa.

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