Health & Science

Health
8:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Police Report Naloxone Highly Effective At Reducing Drug Deaths

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 12:13 pm

The Quincy Police Department was one of the first law enforcement agencies to distribute a drug called Naloxone, a drug used to reverse opiate overdoses. Police Lt. Patrick Glynn speaks to NPR's Scott Simon about the experimental move.

Food
8:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Performance Drinks Pour Liquid Fuel Into Olympic Athletes

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 12:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know, athletes burn a tremendous number of calories in competition and training and with the Olympics underway we got to wondering just what they consume to recover from a workout and fortify themselves for upcoming events. So we're reached nutritionist Nanna Meyer in Sochi. She teaches at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and she is the U.S. Olympic speedskating team sport dietician there are the games.

Thanks very much for being with us.

NANNA MEYER: Thanks very much for having me.

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Health
8:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Forecasting The Flu, Tweet By Tweet

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 12:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Digital Life
8:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

An App On The Search For The Secret To Happiness

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 12:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Social scientists have a new way of researching happiness. Now, for years you had to ask somebody why they were happy in order study what makes somebody happy, but that's been hard to do every minute of every day until now. Guy Raz of the TED Radio Hour explains.

GUY RAZ, BYLINE: Matt Killingsworth is a scientist who...

MATT KILLINGSWORTH: ...studies the causes and nature of human happiness.

RAZ: Which used to mean bringing people to a lab and interviewing them and trying to figure out...

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

1 In 4 Americans Thinks The Sun Goes Around The Earth, Survey Says

A view of Venus, black dot at top center, passing in front of the sun during a transit in 2012. A quarter of Americans questioned failed to answer correctly the most basic questions on astronomy.
AP

A quarter of Americans surveyed could not correctly answer that the Earth revolves around the sun and not the other way around, according to a report out Friday from the National Science Foundation.

The survey of 2,200 people in the United States was conducted by the NSF in 2012 and released on Friday at an annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Chicago.

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The Salt
5:36 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

For The Love Of Oysters: How A Kiss From The Sea Evokes Passion

Lunch with oysters and wine by Frans van Mieris, 1635-1681.
Universal Images Group UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 6:58 pm

Question: Which of these foods are said to stir passion? An oyster, and avocado or a turnip? (Scroll down to the bottom for the answer.)

One of these, at least, is a gimme. The stories linking oysters and other shellfish to lust go back to at least the ancient Greeks.

Think of the image of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, rising out of the sea from the half-shell.

"There's something primal about eating oysters," says oyster-lover MJ Gimbar. He describes them as creamy and velvety. "It's like a kiss from the ocean."

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Science
5:32 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Illegal, Remote Pot Farms In California Poisoning Rare Wildlife

Fishers are among the small carnivores threatened by rat poisons used to guard plants at illegal marijuana farms.
John Jacobson U.S Fish & Wildlife Service

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 6:58 pm

People who grow marijuana illegally in the backwoods of Northern California use large amounts of rat bait to protect their plants — and these chemicals are killing several species of wild animals, including rare ones, biologists say.

Here's what happens: The growers plant their marijuana in remote locations, hoping to elude detection. They irrigate their plants — with water from streams — which lures animals looking for water. Rodents chew the flourishing plants to get moisture, which kills the plants. Researchers believe that's the prime reason growers use the poisons.

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Joe's Big Idea
5:32 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

NASA's On Alert For Big Scary Asteroids. What About Smaller Ones?

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 6:58 pm

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Health & Science
1:17 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evolving at GE, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare

Patient comfort is important when it comes to magnetic resonance imaging machines.
Credit © Dave Lauridsen 2012

 

Lake Effect's Mitch Teich interviews Richard Hausmann and Robert Weisbecker.

A few months ago, we brought you a story about making imaging machines, like CT scanners, more child-friendly.  The issue was that the devices were so intimidating to children that it was affecting the ability of technicians to get good results.

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Shots - Health News
12:26 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Here's One More Reason To Play Video Games: Beating Dyslexia

Video games with lots of action might be useful for helping people with dyslexia train the brain's attention system.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 1:38 pm

Most parents prefer that their children pick up a book rather than a game controller. But for kids with dyslexia, action video games may be just what the doctor ordered.

Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disabilities, affecting an estimated 5 to 10 percent of the world's population. Many approaches to help struggling readers focus on words and phonetics, but researchers at Oxford University say dyslexia is more of an attention issue.

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