Health & Science

Think back to the last time you got negative feedback — like when your doctor suggested you lay off the cigarettes or when your mother advised you to get rid of that ridiculous goatee.

Though we all understand the value of constructive criticism, we don't like hearing that we've done something wrong. And the knee-jerk reaction is to act defensive.

But if you focus on the big picture and future goals, you may be able to trick your mind into being a bit more receptive.

One tech nerd is bringing the '80s back, this time in wearables.

The Apple II Watch, designed by 24-year-old DJ Harrigan, is meant to parody the Apple Watch, which was released Friday, and show what wearables might have looked like in the 1980s. The design is bulky and retro, with a tan body and the rainbow Apple logo evocative of the '70s and '80s.

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Zeynep Tufekci's TED Talk

These days, all it takes to start a protest is a cell phone, says professor Zeynep Tufekci. But does the ease of social media impede social movements from making big gains?

About Zeynep Tufekci

Why Don't Ants Need A Leader?

Apr 24, 2015

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Deborah Gordon's TED Talk

The world's largest ant colony stretches over 3,700 miles. It succeeds, biologist Deborah Gordon says, because no one is in charge. The ants communicate with algorithmic patterns to survive and thrive.

About Deborah Gordon

How Can Kids Help Parents Manage Their Family?

Apr 24, 2015

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Bruce Feiler's TED Talk

Parents help their kids manage their lives. But according to Bruce Feiler, it can work the other way around. It just takes a little insight drawn from Japanese computer programming principles.

About Bruce Feiler

The Apple Watch is making quite a splash with its launch Friday, but most of us have never thought about this new gadget, the "smart watch." Is it a luxury item, or is the smart watch destined to be the next great essential, something we don't know we'll need but will.

Mike Massimino is one of the last people to ever see the Hubble Space Telescope in person.

From inside his orbiting space shuttle, the telescope first appeared on the horizon as a star, says Massimino, who was an astronaut on the final mission to service the space telescope in 2009.

Passwords get hacked — a lot. In an effort to move beyond passwords, big companies are embracing biometric technology: the use of fingerprints, iris scans or voice recognition for user identification.

To heighten security, smartphones are being outfitted with biometric features. But, ditching passwords for biometrics may not make the hackers go away.

Selfie Security

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Transcript

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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