Health & Science

All Tech Considered
1:51 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Netflix Built Its Microgenres By Staring Into The American Soul

While counting Netflix's microgenres, Madrigal discovered the streaming service's favorite adjective: romantic. It appears in 5,272 categories.
Robert Sullivan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 9:17 pm

In the old days, a movie genre was a simple, communal category: Action/Adventure, Comedy, Drama. One had to locate oneself in the Drama aisle at the video store and then look for just the right thing: A dark road trip movie with a strong female lead? Aha, Thelma & Louise.

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Shots - Health News
1:31 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World

"It's on the left," he says. "No, it's southeast of here," she says.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:05 am

Lera Boroditsky once did a simple experiment: She asked people to close their eyes and point southeast. A room of distinguished professors in the U.S. pointed in almost every possible direction, whereas 5-year-old Australian aboriginal girls always got it right.

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The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Best Video Of The Day? MIT's 3-D Remote 'Touching' Device

The man on the screen isn't really there. But the flashlight he's moving around is.
Tangible.Media.MIT.edu

It's tempting to say this is the coolest video we've seen so far this year, but a joke like that might make it sound like we're not serious.

Really, there is something about this that strikes as amazing.

The Tangible Media Group at the MIT Media Lab calls its invention a "tangible user interface."

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Alleged Hackers Explain Reasons For Posting Snapchat Data

The logo and a page of mobile app "Snapchat" are displayed on tablets. Hackers broke into Snapchat, the popular mobile app, accessing the phone numbers and usernames of 4.6 million users and publishing them online.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 1:56 pm

After millions of Snapchat usernames and other data were posted online, a group is saying it revealed the partial phone numbers and other information because the social-sharing service didn't do enough to increase its security. The popular service allows users to send images that vanish 10 seconds after they're seen.

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Code Switch
11:11 am
Thu January 2, 2014

A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Fisk University physics student Terreka Hart (foreground, left) looks on with a group of students from the Bridge Program — Melanie Brady, Bobby Jones, Rose Perea (seated) and Brenden Wiggins (pointing).
C. Coca Fisk University

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 5:06 pm

There is a widespread narrative in higher education that goes something like this: Colleges and universities have always accepted the best and brightest students; then, due to pressure from outside forces (some of them named "John F. Kennedy"), diversity was thrust upon the academy. In turn, schools meted out race-based scholarships, relaxed standards for certain students in order to fulfill quotas and — poof! — diversity.

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NPR Story
5:08 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Scarcity Trap Affects Our Thinking, Behavior

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:52 am

A Harvard economist finds there are psychological connections between the bad financial planning of many poor people and the poor time management of busy professionals. In both cases, he finds the experience of scarcity causes biases in the mind that exacerbate problems.

The Salt
4:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Why The Cod On Cape Cod Now Comes From Iceland

With local cod so scarce, Chef Toby Hill of Lyric Restaurant in Yarmouth Port, Mass., tries out a dogfish salad — served here with garlic aioli on toast — instead. Dogfish is still plentiful in New England waters, but wholesale fisheries say there's not much demand for it in the U.S.
Christine Hochkeppel Courtesy of Cape Cod Times

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 1:53 pm

Good luck finding local cod in Cape Cod, Mass.

The fish once sustained New England's fishing industry, but in recent years, regulators have imposed severe catch limits on cod, and the fish remain scarce.

"I've never seen cod fishing this bad," says Greg Walinsky, who has been fishing on Cape Cod for more than 30 years. "It looks to me like it's over. And I can't catch any codfish."

It's so bad, many fishermen say, that for the first time, they cannot catch enough cod to even reach shrinking government quotas.

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The Salt
4:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Mass-Produced Meat Turned Phosphorus Into Pollution

A dead carp floats in water near the shore at Big Creek State Park on Sept. 10 in Polk City, Iowa. Like many agricultural states, Iowa is working with the EPA to enforce clean-water regulations amid degradation from manure spills and farm-field runoff.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 9:27 am

It's a quandary of food production: The same drive for efficiency that lowers the cost of eating also can damage our soil and water.

Take the case of one simple, essential chemical element: phosphorus.

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Shots - Health News
3:07 am
Thu January 2, 2014

'Good Behavior' More Than A Game To Health Care Plan

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 7:03 am

Behaving well in elementary school could reduce smoking in later life. At least, that's what Trillium Community Health Plan hopes, and it's putting money behind the idea.

Danebo Elementary in Eugene, Ore., is one of 50 schools receiving money to teach classes while integrating something called the "Good Behavior Game." Teacher Cami Railey sits at a small table, surrounded by four kids. She's about to teach them the "s" sound and the "a" sound. But first, as she does every day, she goes over the rules.

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All Tech Considered
7:43 pm
Wed January 1, 2014

More Than 300 Sharks In Australia Are Now On Twitter

A shark warning is displayed near Gracetown, Western Australia, in November. An Australian man was killed by a shark near the area that month, sparking a catch-and-kill order.
Rebecca Le May EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 9:35 am

Sharks in Western Australia are now tweeting out where they are — in a way.

Government researchers have tagged 338 sharks with acoustic transmitters that monitor where the animals are. When a tagged shark is about half a mile away from a beach, it triggers a computer alert, which tweets out a message on the Surf Life Saving Western Australia Twitter feed. The tweet notes the shark's size, breed and approximate location.

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