Health & Science

Shots - Health News
1:31 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World

"It's on the left," he says. "No, it's southeast of here," she says.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:05 am

Lera Boroditsky once did a simple experiment: She asked people to close their eyes and point southeast. A room of distinguished professors in the U.S. pointed in almost every possible direction, whereas 5-year-old Australian aboriginal girls always got it right.

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The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Best Video Of The Day? MIT's 3-D Remote 'Touching' Device

The man on the screen isn't really there. But the flashlight he's moving around is.
Tangible.Media.MIT.edu

It's tempting to say this is the coolest video we've seen so far this year, but a joke like that might make it sound like we're not serious.

Really, there is something about this that strikes as amazing.

The Tangible Media Group at the MIT Media Lab calls its invention a "tangible user interface."

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Alleged Hackers Explain Reasons For Posting Snapchat Data

The logo and a page of mobile app "Snapchat" are displayed on tablets. Hackers broke into Snapchat, the popular mobile app, accessing the phone numbers and usernames of 4.6 million users and publishing them online.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 1:56 pm

After millions of Snapchat usernames and other data were posted online, a group is saying it revealed the partial phone numbers and other information because the social-sharing service didn't do enough to increase its security. The popular service allows users to send images that vanish 10 seconds after they're seen.

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Code Switch
11:11 am
Thu January 2, 2014

A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Fisk University physics student Terreka Hart (foreground, left) looks on with a group of students from the Bridge Program — Melanie Brady, Bobby Jones, Rose Perea (seated) and Brenden Wiggins (pointing).
C. Coca Fisk University

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 5:06 pm

There is a widespread narrative in higher education that goes something like this: Colleges and universities have always accepted the best and brightest students; then, due to pressure from outside forces (some of them named "John F. Kennedy"), diversity was thrust upon the academy. In turn, schools meted out race-based scholarships, relaxed standards for certain students in order to fulfill quotas and — poof! — diversity.

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NPR Story
5:08 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Scarcity Trap Affects Our Thinking, Behavior

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:52 am

A Harvard economist finds there are psychological connections between the bad financial planning of many poor people and the poor time management of busy professionals. In both cases, he finds the experience of scarcity causes biases in the mind that exacerbate problems.

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