Health & Science

Digital Life
3:15 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Meet The Guy Who's Putting Your Cat On The Map — To Prove A Point

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 5:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

OK, Robert, it's time for the two of us to talk about a pervasive threat to our online privacy.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

U.S. Teens Still Lag In Getting Vaccinated Against HPV

Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 9:48 am

Though the vaccine against human papilloma virus is highly effective in preventing certain forms of cancer, the number of preteens getting the vaccine is still dismally low, doctors from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday.

"One of the top five reasons parents listed is that it hadn't been recommended to them by a doctor or nurse," the CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat told reporters at a press briefing.

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Goats and Soda
1:58 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

This Suit Keeps Ebola Out — So How Can A Health Worker Catch It?

Protective gear runs from goggles and head covering to gloves and boots. This health worker was photographed leaving the isolation area at the treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:56 pm

The fight against Ebola in West Africa suffered a setback Wednesday. Dr. Sheik Umar Khan, one of the top doctors treating patients, caught the virus, even though he was wearing protective gear.

"Even with the full protective clothing you put on," Khan has said, "you are at risk."

That statement made us wonder about those yellow and white suits you see in photos: Just how good are they at protecting health workers from the bodily fluids that can transmit the virus — vomit, blood, sweat, mucus?

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U.S.
12:33 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Do Heat-Sensitive Inmates Have A Right To Air Conditioning?

Inmate dormitories at Louisiana State Penitentiary, like this one photographed in July 2011, have heating in the winter and cooling by fans and open windows in the summer, but no air conditioning. A judge ruled earlier this year that that constituted cruel and unusual punishment, but installation is on hold pending a state appeal.
Scott Threlkeld The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 6:40 pm

The exact cause of prisoner Jerome Murdough's death at Rikers Island in February is still under investigation. But the temperature in the cell when he was found in New York City's biggest jail was at least 100 degrees.

The death of Murdough, who had severe mental illness, called renewed attention to a long-standing problem: maintaining reasonable temperatures in jails and prisons.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Zoo In Argentina Says 'Sad Bear' Too Old To Go To Canada

Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, lives in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza. The plight of the "sad bear" has spawned more than 400,000 signatures on a petition to get him moved to a "better life" in Canada.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 12:55 pm

Despite a public outcry that resulted in more than a half-million petition signatures and a personal appeal by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Arturo, Argentina's "sad bear," has been deemed too old to migrate to Canada.

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Health
11:23 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Effective New HIV Treatment Makes Researcher 'Hopeful' In Fighting Epidemic

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
10:46 am
Thu July 24, 2014

When Federal Privacy Laws Protect Hospitals Instead Of Patients

ProPublica

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 10:50 am

In the name of patient privacy, a security guard at a hospital in Springfield, Mo., threatened a mother with jail for trying to take a photograph of her own son.

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Goats and Soda
10:32 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Globe-Trotting Virus Hides Inside People's Gut Bacteria

We are all Russian nesting dolls: Our intestines house many bacteria, which house many viruses. These so-called bacteriophages are likely as important for our health as the bacteria they live in.
Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 12:34 pm

New viruses are a dime a dozen.

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The Two-Way
10:03 am
Thu July 24, 2014

U.S. Database Glitch Delays Passport, Visa Processing

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 5:07 pm

The U.S. State Department's global database for processing visas and passports is experiencing problems that could cause delays for millions of people around the world who are awaiting travel documents.

The Associated Press writes:

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Goats and Soda
9:47 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Shades Of The Middle Ages: The Plague Popped Up In China And Colorado

Health officials examine rats for signs of bubonic plague in New Orleans, 1914.
U.S. National Library of Medicine

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:48 pm

The plague isn't just something you read about in medieval history books.

This past week, five cases were reported: four in Colorado and one in China.

The Colorado residents were diagnosed after coming into contact with an infected dog.

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