Health & Science

Death and Dying
4:09 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

New Technology Means Staving Off Death, More End-of-Life Questions

Medical technology, like feeding tubes, allow us to live longer than we otherwise would, but do they make end-of-life care decisions more complicated?
Credit Photo courtesy of U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services

This week, Lake Effect producer Stephanie Lecci is exploring issues surrounding death and dying in the 21st century. Indeed, the questions surrounding end-of-life care today are much different from the way they were in the past. Technology is allowing us to live longer with more disease, and to sustain life even when we are no longer able to communicate our wishes.

As we heard yesterday, that can put a lot of stress on caregivers making proxy decisions. But how did we get here? And what do we have to consider when we try to lay out our wishes ahead of time?

Read more
Death and Dying
4:15 pm
Tue September 25, 2012

Easing the Stress of Caregivers in End-of-Life Care

Providing end-of-life care can cause stress that makes decision-making tough.
Credit via Flickr

This week on Lake Effect, producer Stephanie Lecci is exploring issues surrounding death and dying in our culture. One of those issues is what it's like to care for someone who is in the final stages of his or her life. As difficult as it may be to make our own decisions regarding our own dying process, it is even more difficult to make those decisions on behalf of a loved one. Complicating this is a condition known as "caregiver syndrome," the manifestation of the physical and emotional stress of long-term care of a loved one. This can affect a proxy's ability to make sound decisions about end-of-life care.

Read more
Death and Dying
4:19 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Death and Dying Series preview

Beginning tomorrow on Lake Effect, producer Stephanie Lecci brings us a series of conversations around the theme of death and dying in the 21st Century.

The series was born out of a scholarship she received from the Religion Newswriters Association that allowed her to take a course at Alverno College in Control of Life and Death.

Stephanie Lecci joins us in the studio to give us a preview of what we can expect to hear for the rest of the week.

Health & Science
4:57 pm
Wed August 1, 2012

High Deductible Plans Benefit Some, Headache for Others

High Deductible Health Care Plans are growing in popularity.

One of the biggest financial burdens individuals and businesses face is the rising cost of health care. In order to ease that weight, some people and employers have been turning to High Deductible Health Care Plans. They keep monthly premiums low by requiring patients to spend a significant amount of money before their insurance kicks-in. As WUWM’s LaToya Dennis reports, those high deductible plans can pay off, but are a gamble.

Read more
Health & Science
5:09 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

One Man's Meat is Another Man's Poison

Ground Beef

Many of us are rightfully concerned about the safety of what we eat and what might be added to foods along the processing chain from farm to table. But Lake Effect essayist Judy Steininger says a knowing a little basic chemistry might help ease some of our concerns.

Read more
Health & Science
4:21 pm
Thu June 14, 2012

Wisconsin AIDS Care a National Model

Dr. John Fangman, right, discusses a case with one of his residents at the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin.
Credit Erin Toner

Wisconsin recently reported a sharp increase in new HIV infections. They rose nearly 20 percent from 2010 to 2011, with the most new cases in Milwaukee County. While the numbers are alarming and the population sometimes difficult to reach, those who connect early with the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin are in good hands. As WUWM’s Erin Toner reports, it has become a one-stop-shop for the many services patients may need and is considered a national model.

Read more
Health & Science
4:37 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

Orangutans Hop on the iPad Bandwagon

Orangutans and iPads
Milwaukee County Zoo

Back in February, Lake Effect celebrated Primate week with a series of stories and features about our close cousins. One of those features considered the technological prowess of primates – and we’re not talking just humans. There was Albert II, the first rhesus monkey in space. Or the orangutans at the Milwaukee County Zoo, who, like their human counterparts, really enjoy iPads. It may not be what Steve Jobs had in mind, but it turns out that iPads have some practical uses at a zoo.

Read more
Veterans
3:24 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Mental Health Clinic Provides Unique Treatment to Veterans' Families

Therapist Kathy Anderson chats with Claudia Stetz, the widow of a Vietnam War veteran.
Credit Erin Toner

Monday, we reported on a one-year-old clinic in West Allis treating a growing number of veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Some say they’re seeking outside therapy because they’re dissatisfied with their VA health care. This morning, WUWM’s Erin Toner revisits the clinic to report on another free service it provides – mental health services for the families of veterans. Family members don’t qualify for care at VA hospitals.

Read more
Veterans
3:17 pm
Tue May 1, 2012

New Clinic Provides Mental Health Care to Veterans, Family Members

Therapist Kathy Anderson, left, and client Claudia Stetz, right, relax at Veteran Quest in West Allis.
Credit Erin Toner

An alarming number of suicides among American soldiers has/have been pressuring the VA to improve mental health services for veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. As a result, the U.S. Veterans Affairs Department plans to add nearly 2,000 employees to reduce wait times for appointments. In Milwaukee, a growing number of vets dissatisfied with the VA have been supplementing their government care with therapy at an outside clinic. As WUWM’s Erin Toner reports, it offers a less structured approach.

Read more
Health & Science
4:26 pm
Thu April 12, 2012

Local Hospital Tests Software Allowing Doctors to Ditch Pagers

Dr. Sam Zaidat has begun using his smartphone to respond to pages, as part of a pilot project at Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin.
Credit Erin Toner

Technology has transformed health care in recent times – supplying everything from sophisticated imaging machines to electronic medical records. When it comes to communications, though, the medical field continues to rely on a device many might consider archaic – the pager. But doctors may soon ditch their trusty old beepers, at least at one Milwaukee-area hospital. As WUWM’s Erin Toner reports, it’s testing a new system in hopes of improving patient care.

Read more

Pages