Health & Science

Perhaps you've noticed a toddler's sagging swim diaper and wondered if it's really keeping the poop out of your neighborhood pool.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the answer for you: no.

Last summer, researchers at the federal public health agency collected 161 filter samples from public swimming pools in the Atlanta area. More than half of those samples, 58 percent, were contaminated with E. coli.

That, the CDC reported today, "signifies that swimmers introduced fecal matter into pool water."

People smell yummy to mosquitoes.

So yummy, in fact, that our scent is a big way the pesky insects track us down.

But just how much mosquitoes like Eau de Human may not be entirely up to the bugs.

Mosquitoes are more attracted to human odors when they're infected with the malaria parasite, scientists reported Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.

"The head of Saudi Arabia's religious police has warned citizens against using Twitter, which is rising in popularity among Saudis," the BBC reports. "Sheikh Abdul Latif Abdul Aziz al-Sheikh said anyone using social media sites — and especially Twitter — 'has lost this world and his afterlife.' "

International Digital Times notes that:

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

We're going to look closely this morning at a dramatic advance in science.

GREENE: And also its far-reaching implications. The advance involves embryonic stem cell research.

INSKEEP: Which scientists see as a route to dramatic advances in medical treatment. Researchers have now figured out how to make embryonic stem cells that carry a specific individual's DNA.

The news that U.S. scientists have successfully cloned a human embryo seems almost certain to rekindle a political fight that has raged, on and off, since the announcement of the creation of Dolly the sheep in 1997.

Scientists have discovered water that has been trapped in rock for more than a billion years. The water might contain microbes that evolved independently from the surface world, and it's a finding that gives new hope to the search for life on other planets.

The water samples came from holes drilled by gold miners near the small town of Timmins, Ontario, about 350 miles north of Toronto. Deep in the Canadian bedrock, miners drill holes and collect samples. Sometimes they hit pay dirt; sometimes they hit water, which seeps out from tiny crevices in the rock.

Richard Wheeler

Actress Angelina Jolie announced yesterday that she’s had a preventive double mastectomy after learning that she carries a genetic mutation that puts her at high risk for developing breast cancer.

That announcement has, for many, rekindled a dilemma about how much information we want to know about our genome, and what do with that information once it’s in hand. 

Photos.com

Does it seem a lot of people around you have suddenly come down with a sore throat or cough? The likely culprit is trees – tree pollen, to be specific.

White House photo via Wiki Commons

A provocative obituary ran in the New York Times on March 30, 2013. It began as follows: “She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job and took eight years off from work to raise three children.”

AlphaTangoBravo, Adam Baker, via Flickr

When you’re the parent of a small child, there are certain milestones in the physical and mental development you tend to look out for.  But beyond the obvious one – things like walking and talking – are some more subtle markers of a child’s development.

Want to Fight Disease? Do Your Math Homework

May 9, 2013
Arizona State University

A common complaint among school kids who don't want to learn their math is that it's not important in the real world. While there is a lot of theory in math, a growing body of researchers are proving this notion wrong by applying math in some surprisingly relevant ways.

A Wisconsin Appeals Court has sided with the City of Milwaukee, when it comes to which entity sets health care costs for police and fire fighters - the municipality decides.

Gov. Walker's Act 10 ended nearly all public union rights in Wisconsin, except for police and fighters. However, lawmakers also extended a provision that prohibits first-responders from negotiating the design of their health insurance plans. The design includes such items as co-pays and deductibles.

Wisconsin is now observing daylight savings time. Residents of most states lost an hour of sleep when time “sprang forward” over the weekend.

In 10 months, the Affordable Care Act moves into full force.

Kenneth Munson, regional director of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, says starting in October, Wisconsin residents can enroll in the state’s health insurance exchange or marketplace. Gov. Walker opted not to create it, so the federal government is doing the job.

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