Politics & Government

Political news

Federal investigators have interviewed top aides to Hillary Clinton about her use of a private email server, the latest advance in an ongoing investigation into whether her email practices as secretary of state may have compromised classified information, according to two people familiar with the matter.

The interviews, of close aides including Huma Abedin, have been conducted by FBI agents, lawyers from the Justice Department's National Security division, and prosecutors from the U.S. Attorney's Office in Alexandria, Va.

So here we are. Noisily embraced by the plurality of Republican voters, not-so-quietly reviled by most Republican leaders, Donald Trump is all but assured that party's presidential nomination.

Journalists astonished at the result — and believe me, most are stunned by what's unfolded — find themselves confronted by some form of this question: Is the media to blame for Donald Trump?

It looks like more bad news for the new executive director of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. Brian Newby is already being sued by the League of Women Voters for his decision earlier this year to allow Kansas and two other states to require residents to show proof of citizenship when they register to vote using a federal form. The move effectively reversed a long-standing EAC policy.

De facto Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump celebrated Cinco de Mayo on Thursday. And being a Twitter aficionado, he couldn't resist telling the world.

"Happy #CincoDeMayo! The best taco bowls are made in Trump Tower Grill," he declared in celebration of the holiday that commemorates the Battle of Puebla in 1862.

"I love Hispanics!" he added.

His message immediately caused a Twitter frenzy. Some were frustrated at what they felt was Trump pandering to Hispanics:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Don't add House Speaker Paul Ryan to the list of Republicans who are, even reluctantly, backing de facto GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

"I'm just not ready to do that at this point. I'm not there right now," the party's 2012 vice presidential nominee said in an interview on CNN's The Lead with Jake Tapper.

The Wisconsin Republican signaled he would eventually like to support Trump, who became the GOP's likely White House nominee this week after both Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich withdrew from the race.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A top party leader, a committee chairman with a deep understanding of national security, and an aspiring senator endorsed Donald Trump shortly after he secured his place as the de facto 2016 GOP presidential nominee.

It's as sure a sign as any that the party is falling in line behind the New York businessman as he prepares to face off against Hillary Clinton in the general election. Even if their hearts are not in it.

A U.S. Army captain has filed a lawsuit against President Obama over the legality of the war against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Capt. Nathan Michael Smith, 28, who is currently on active duty in Kuwait, filed the lawsuit Wednesday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. He argues that the war is illegal because it lacks congressional authorization.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep.


STEVE INSKEEP: How is West Virginia different, if at all, from anywhere else you campaigned?

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS: Well, West Virginia has some pockets of the worst poverty in the United States of America.

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