Politics & Government

Political news

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Leroy Robinson Jr. owns a barbershop in West Philadelphia. He's been doing this work for 40 years — and he says the trade runs in the family.

"My father's a barber, my brother is a barber and here I am," he says.

His favorite part of the job is talking to his customers about, well, nearly everything.

"Right now, the political thing is on the horizon," Robinson says, "But the biggest thing right now is Villanova."

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Copyright 2016 North Country Public Radio. To see more, visit North Country Public Radio.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

During an exchange over how high to raise the minimum wage in Thursday night's Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders began to shout over each other, hands raised, fingers pointed, both seeming to get a bit red in the face, while the audience cheered and booed in equal parts.

It was quite a scene. As NPR's Ron Elving put it, "Both Sanders and Clinton showed flashes of animosity bordering on contempt."

One of the biggest stories of the election cycle is turnout (as we've reported a few times now): Republican turnout has spiked far beyond 2012 levels, and Democratic turnout has fallen off after the party's mammoth 2008.

The tone and the turnout are vastly different between Republicans and Democrats this year, but oddly enough, both sides have something crucial in common: their voters are far less moderate than they were in their last primaries.

It's essentially impossible to win the Democratic nomination without support from women.

In primaries and caucuses across the country, women make up a solid majority of the Democratic electorate. In fact, according to exit poll data, there's not a state that's voted to date where women made up less than 54 percent of Democratic voters. And, in Mississippi, women made up nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of Democratic primary voters.

President Obama is throwing his weight behind a plan that would lead to competition in the market for set-top cable and satellite TV boxes. Most viewers now rent the boxes from their TV providers. The Federal Communications Commission wants to make it easier for viewers to buy the devices.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump has based his presidential campaign on resentment toward the establishment, and some alarmed Republicans have called for national leaders to take Trump down.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bernie-mania hit Vatican City today with a crush of Italian media, cameras, boom microphones, shouting reporters and a ring of civilians, smartphones held aloft, chanting "Bernie, Bernie, Bernie!"

Sanders was not there to meet with Pope Francis, who is on the road himself visiting a refugee camp in Greece. The Democratic hopeful had accepted an invitation from the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences to speak at a conference on social and economic justice.

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