Politics & Government

Political news

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Presidential candidates deliver hundreds of stump speeches over the course of their campaigns. This week, we're looking closely to the messages that the two major-party candidates deliver in city after city.

In his stump speech, Donald Trump brings the energy and spends a lot of time talking about core issues like illegal immigration and trade as well as attacking the media and hitting Hillary Clinton, especially over her emails. And there's plenty of ad-libbing, especially about what's in the news.

As presidential candidates travel the country, they often deliver the same speech, or close to it. We are annotating speeches delivered by both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to give you a sense of what they are talking about regularly, and how they say it.

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David Axelrod, a top Democratic strategist and former senior adviser to President Obama, believes Hillary Clinton made the controversy surrounding her health worse by not disclosing her pneumonia diagnosis earlier.

"Obviously her penchant for privacy is what led her to have a separate email system, and there have been other occasions in her public career in which she's tried to create a zone of privacy," Axelrod told NPR's Steve Inskeep on Morning Edition. He tweeted a similar sentiment on Monday:

Hillary Clinton's "basket of deplorables" remark has echoed through the political interwebs and produced many rounds of cable TV analysis.

Sure, conservatives pounced. And some liberals laughed in agreement. But does it matter in the real world?

Updated at 6:25 p.m.

Hillary Clinton's campaign released additional medical information on the Democratic nominee's health Wednesday, a day before she is set to resume campaigning after being diagnosed with pneumonia.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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