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President Trump's proposed budget calls for big cuts in a wide array of domestic programs — among them, agencies that fund the arts, humanities and public media.

Funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be cut to zero under the proposal, and the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities would be eliminated entirely, the first time any president has proposed such a measure.

Ask any veteran lawyer about her worst fear, and you'll hear this: the client who digs a hole for himself — and then keeps on digging.

The challenge of defending a difficult client is once again in the news this week as the Justice Department has struggled to convince federal judges that President Trump's executive order, imposing limits on travelers from six majority Muslim countries, is not, in fact, a ban on Muslims.

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President Trump released a budget blueprint Thursday.

His proposed spending package for the country totals $1.15 trillion, and it slashes many domestic programs such as the EPA, in order to fund a significant increase in military spending. The plan's $54 billion boost for the U.S. military is the largest any president has proposed since Ronald Reagan, in the 1980's.

Updated at 4:02 p.m. ET

If there was any doubt over President Trump's views on climate change, those doubts evaporated with the unveiling of his proposed federal budget on Thursday.

The budget would end programs to lower domestic greenhouse gas emissions, slash diplomatic efforts to slow climate change and cut scientific missions to study the climate.

This morning President Trump released a proposed 2018 budget that calls for a $9 billion, or 13.5 percent, cut for the U.S. Department of Education.

Hawaii Attorney General On Trump Travel Ban

Mar 16, 2017

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A Senate committee held a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that would remove the work permit requirement for 16 and 17-year-olds in Wisconsin. Supporters of the plan say it would eliminate red tape, while opponents say they’re concerned about the teens’ safety.

Wisconsin restaurants have employed many 16 and 17-year-olds over the years, according to Ed Lump. He’s president of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association.

Updated at 10:45 p.m.

President Trump blasted a federal judge's decision to temporarily halt his revised travel ban on Wednesday night, telling a campaign rally in Nashville, Tenn., that he wished he had stood his ground and fought for his original, much stricter executive order.

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When Democrats held a majority of the seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, and Rep. Nancy Pelosi was the House speaker, she helped pass the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Now, after more than six years in the minority party, she is watching House Republicans move to repeal and replace parts of the law.

She says that although Democrats don't have the votes to stop the GOP legislation alone, they can still show their opposition to it.

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