Politics & Government

Political news

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

We have reached the point in this campaign season where late-night talk show hosts negotiate presidential debates.

Why do you look so surprised? When you think about it, it kind of makes perfect sense.

Over the last two nights, Jimmy Kimmel, host of ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live!, has seemingly been brokering a presidential debate between presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is still in the running against likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

Lawmakers: They're just like us!

"Everyone's favorite parlor game right now in D.C. is who will be the vice presidential pick," Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairwoman Linda Sanchez, D-Calif., said at a briefing with reporters.

Every four years, the guessing game around the "veepstakes" reaches fever pitch right around now, when the nominating conventions are just weeks away. Democratic lawmakers are rich in opinions on whom Hillary Clinton should tap as her running mate.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

If you've been following the Democratic presidential contest, you might be wondering how it is possible that Bernie Sanders seems to have all the energy and enthusiasm and, yet, Hillary Clinton is way ahead in the race to the nomination.

A listener named Gerard Allen wrote into the NPR Politics Podcast with an observation:

Donald Trump marched through the Republican presidential primary field this year on the strength of a focused message: America used to be great. It isn't anymore. And that's mostly the fault of the Obama administration.

On Thursday, Trump applied that same thesis to American energy production. "America's incredible energy potential remains untapped," he told a North Dakota audience in what was billed as a major policy address. "It's totally self-inflicted. It's a wound, and it's a wound we have to heal."

The politics team is back with its weekly roundup of political news. The team discusses why we can now say officially that Trump is the presumptive nominee for the Republican Party, why we're still talking about Hillary Clinton's emails and why everything happening now goes straight back to the '90s.

On the podcast:

  • National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson
  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders
  • Congressional Reporter Susan Davis

On Thursday, Donald Trump reached the magic number — 1,237. That's the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination, and he got there after 29 unbound Republican delegates decided to support him at the convention.

NPR's Don Gonyea spoke to some of those delegates to ask what made them decide to support Trump.

Ben Koppelman, Republican Convention Delegate From North Dakota

On switching support from Cruz to Trump

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One way we know we are (finally) nearing the end of this presidential nominating season is that both major parties have begun talking about big changes to the way they choose their nominees.

Both parties have been stunned by outsider candidates in this cycle. But the shock seems to be moving them in opposite directions. That may be because one party's outsider has actually won the nomination while the other's is falling short.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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