Politics & Government

Political news

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union was historic, significant, unprecedented and decisive — but it wasn't uniform.

It was split by age: Young people overwhelmingly voted to stay, while older generations preferred to leave. It was split by education, with university-educated voters far more likely to be pro-EU.

Bernie Sanders said he'll vote for Hillary Clinton in November — but more than two weeks after she became the presumptive Democratic nominee, Sanders remains in the race.

Sanders was on MSNBC when Nicolle Wallace, a former Republican aide and now network political analyst, asked Sanders, "Are you going to vote for Hillary Clinton in November?"

His answer: "Yes."

He added, "The issue right here is, I think I am going to do everything I can to defeat Donald Trump."

Donald Trump celebrated voters' stunning decision in the United Kingdom to leave the European Union, while he marked the re-opening of his golf course and resort in Scotland.

Trump contended that the U.K. had "taken back their independence" and predicted similar populist, nativist movements throughout the Western world, like the one fueling his candidacy in the U.S.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Businesses and unions often disagree on public policy. But after the Supreme Court's tie vote on immigration Thursday, company executives and labor leaders united to call on Congress to settle the issue.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WUWM Radio

WUWM listeners are familiar with the baritone voice of NPR's Morning Edition co-host David Greene.

Greene is one of the voices that bring national and international stories to listeners over their morning coffee or on commutes to work. He came to the hosting chair after working as an NPR foreign correspondent covering Russia. He also spent four years covering the White House and presidential politics for the network.

A campaign putting out a list of big name endorsements isn't particularly remarkable. But what is remarkable about the Clinton campaign's list is that it includes prominent Republican executives — business leaders who say they have never voted for a Democratic presidential candidate in their lives.

Take Jim Cicconi, the senior executive vice president at AT&T. He served in both the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations and donated $10,000 last year to Jeb Bush's Right to Rise superPAC. But he says he's voting for Hillary Clinton in November.

Thomas Hawk, Flickr

 The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Milwaukee can no longer enforce its residency requirement. The court decided 5-2 that the city's long-standing requirement that city workers also live in Milwaukee violates state law. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is furious, and says the state legislature, the governor's office, and the Supreme Court have all thumbed their nose at the concept of local control. 

Five years ago, the residents of a southern Chinese village drew the world's attention when they chased Communist Party officials out of their hamlet and elected a new leader.

Now, the land disputes that spurred them to action remain unresolved, and the residents of Wukan village are rising up in protest once again after their elected leader was detained on corruption charges Saturday.

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