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Foxconn’s plans to build a huge LCD screen manufacturing facility in southeastern Wisconsin are another step closer to reality. On Monday, an Assembly committee voted in favor of a $3 billion tax incentives package to lure the company here.

Gov. Walker and fellow Republicans are pushing for the deal. Democrats on the committee pushed for nearly two dozen amendments in an effort to soften the burden on taxpayers. But, all of them failed.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

President Trump on Monday authorized his top trade official to look into whether China is guilty of intellectual property theft, a move that could eventually lead to trade sanctions.

Trump called his action "a very big move" against practices that cost our nation "millions of jobs and billions and billions of dollars each and every year."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As tensions mount between the U.S. and North Korea, so does the number of unanswered questions.

Would the U.S. launch a pre-emptive strike?

Would North Korea really attack Guam?

What role will China play?

How did we get to this point?

In this show, we’re taking all questions, big and small, on North Korea. Send them to us with this form, or tune in and give us a call.

Charlottesville And The White Supremacists

Aug 14, 2017

What began as a rally by white supremacists in Virginia this weekend ended in terror Saturday as a car slammed into a group that was protesting the rally, killing at least one person and injuring 19 others.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Almost 48 hours after violence engulfed Charlottesville, Va., President Trump called out white nationalist groups by name. Trump's remarks on Monday followed criticism that his initial statement about the clash of protesters did not condemn racist groups specifically.

The Trump administration is giving insurance companies an extra three weeks to decide whether to offer insurance plans through the Affordable Care Act markets, and how much to charge.

The extension comes as insurance companies wait for President Trump to decide whether he will continue to make payments to insurance companies that are called for under the Affordable Care Act but that some Republicans have opposed.

How should educators confront bigotry, racism and white supremacy? The incidents in Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend pushed that question from history to current events.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday
By the end of the day on Monday, three CEOs had announced they were leaving President Trump's American Manufacturing Council. Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier was the first to announce his resignation followed by Under Armour's Kevin Plank and Intel's Brian Krzanich.

The resignations came after Trump was criticized for his response to the violence at white supremacist events in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. The president, famous for his ability to be direct and forceful, was faulted for condemning violence "on many sides."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The town of Charlottesville, Va., is trying to look forward this morning after a weekend of racist protests and counter-demonstrations that all turned violent.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Yelling, unintelligible).

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREEN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's listen to President Trump speaking to reporters on Saturday, following the violence in Charlottesville, Va.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Bonnie Petrie

Violence erupted in the Sherman Park neighborhood a year ago – after a Milwaukee police officer fatally shot an armed suspect. The outburst was partly the result of frustration over stubborn issues that have been plaguing the central city. Among the top concerns – jobs. The incident prompted Gov. Walker to commit $4.5 million to help employ people from central city neighborhoods.

Milwaukee’s unemployment rate has declined from 6.5 percent to five percent in the year since the Sherman Park unrest, according to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.

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