Politics & Government

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Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene in Des Moines, Iowa, at Smokey Row, a coffeehouse in Des Moines.

Renee, you should really see this. It is - I mean it is hundreds of people, I think, just packed in here.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And in Des Moines, Iowa, I am David Green. And, Renee, I'm at a coffeehouse in Des Moines with - this is a first for me - a live audience.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Iowa caucuses are known for hoisting the little-known hopeful to glory. But for each skyrocket that actually launched here, many more have fizzled on the pad.

The slick talkers auditioning for media gigs.

The household name whose prominence fails to translate.

The ambitious up-and-comer seeking name recognition for the future.

The nonpolitician who strikes a nerve the year before the election year.

After Iowa, the bell tolls for these.

For every Obama ...

Wisconsin voters will decide this spring who wins a ten-year term on the state Supreme Court.  This month in the primary, they will narrow the field from three candidates to two.  

They are:  Incumbent Justice Rebecca Bradley, Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Joe Donald and Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg.  All three recently made their cases during a debate in Milwaukee.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Finally, after more than 10 months of campaigning from more than a dozen presidential candidates, voters get to weigh in. Iowa Republicans and Democrats will caucus Monday night, and the results could at long last provide some clarity to the Republican and Democratic nominating contests — or not.

Here are five things we're watching:

It's noon at the Islamic Center of Cedar Rapids. Dozens of worshippers stream up the front walk, past children from the center's preschool playing in the snow, heading in through doors under a blue-and-white minaret to attend Friday prayers.

Inside, after the call to prayer, the center's imam, 28-year-old Hassan Selim, rises before the congregation to give his sermon.

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