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Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

The Justice Department is appointing former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee the growing probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and possible ties to associates of President Trump.

"In my capacity as acting Attorney General, I determined that it is in the public interest for me to exercise my authority and appoint a Special Counsel to assume responsibility for this matter," Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said in a statement.

Updated on May 23 at 6:40 p.m. ET

When Seth Rich was killed in July 2016, police suspected it was a botched robbery.

This week, sparked by a report from a TV station in Washington, D.C., that crime took over conservative media.

The reason: Seth Rich was a Democratic National Committee staffer, and some have theorized that his work was connected to his murder.

There is no hard evidence that is true. In fact, further reporting has blown large holes in Fox 5 DC's Monday report.

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The reports that President Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey to drop an investigation into Michael Flynn has a small but growing number of Democrats in Congress talking openly about a drastic step.

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Lawmakers are also starting to hear from their constituents.

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Amid several swirling crises engulfing his administration, President Trump used part of his speech Wednesday to graduates at the United States Coast Guard Academy to complain about how unfairly he was being treated by the media.

"Over the course of your life, you will find that things are not always fair. You will find that things happen to you that you do not deserve and that are not always warranted," the president told graduates of the military service academy in New London, Conn. "But you have to put your head down and fight, fight, fight."

Hours after a news report that President Trump had asked the FBI director to back away from an investigation, Democrats seized on the information to accuse the White House of a serious crime.

"We are witnessing an obstruction of justice case unfolding in real time," said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., a former state attorney general.

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Talking on a stage spilling over with supporters in a courtyard even more jammed with fans, Larry Krasner told the cheering crowd he was not deterred by long odds.

"We were told it was political suicide to say, 'I will never seek the death penalty,'" Krasner said. "Does that look like political suicide right now?"

He rode the flood of applause that followed.

Krasner, a long-time civil rights attorney, handily won the Democratic primary on Tuesday in a seven-way race to become Philadelphia's next district attorney.

A North Carolina senator collapsed while running a race in Washington Wednesday morning, but said he was "doing well" after being hospitalized.

Sen. Thom Tillis, a Republican, was seen on the ground about 20 minutes into the ACLI Capital Challenge, an annual three-mile race in the southeast part of D.C.

The elephant in the room whenever talking about President Trump and the Russia investigation is the big I-word — impeachment.

The word had been in the not-so-far reaches of liberal conspiracy talk since Trump was elected. There is a website with more than 976,000 signatures on a petition encouraging Congress to impeach Trump. There is even an "Impeach Donald Trump" Twitter handle.

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Joining us now on the line is a member of the Senate intelligence committee, Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine. Senator, thanks so much for being with us.

SUSAN COLLINS: Glad to join you.

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