World

Afghanistan
6:42 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Afghans Vote In Large Numbers Despite Risks

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 10:18 am

After a campaign marred by violence, Afghans voted Saturday in presidential elections for what's to be the first ever democratic transfer of power. Results are not expected for some time.

World
4:45 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Taunt Or Miscalculation? Iran's Provocative Pick For U.N. Envoy

Iranian students climb over the wall of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran during the Iranian Revolution, Nov. 4, 1979. The students went on to seize the embassy staff, and hold 52 of them as hostages for 444 days.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 10:18 am

Iran's reported decision to name Hamid Aboutalebi as its ambassador to the United Nations has ignited anger in the U.S. That's because the diplomat was part of the student group that held Americans hostage in 1979. Now, dozens of lawmakers are urging the Obama administration to deny him a visa.

It's the latest sign of just how difficult it will be for Washington and Tehran to overcome decades of mistrust.

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The Two-Way
1:33 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Defying Taliban Threats, Afghans Vote For Next Leader

Long lines were seen at almost every polling station around Kabul Saturday, despite heavy rain and security threats.
David P Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 11:31 am

  • Afghan Election: NPR's Sean Carberry Reports From Kabul

Millions of Afghans lined up to vote for a new president Saturday, despite warnings of violence from the Taliban.

Saturday's historic vote begins what would be the first democratic transfer of power for Afghanistan; President Hamid Karzai has served for two terms and is not allowed to run for a third under the country's constitution.

The Taliban launched a number of attacks that killed dozens in the weeks before the election, but no major violence was reported after polls opened Saturday.

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

McDonald's Shuts Its Restaurants In Crimea

The McDonald's fast food restaurant in Sevastopol, Crimea, in a photograph taken on Friday.
Anton Pedko EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 5:21 pm

McDonald's, citing the "evolving situation" in Crimea, said Friday it was closing its three restaurants on the Black Sea peninsula, but the move has prompted one prominent Moscow politician to call for the fast-food giant to be booted from all of Russia.

"Due to operational reasons beyond our control, McDonald's has taken the decision to temporarily close our three restaurants in Simferopol, Sevastopol and Yalta," a spokeswoman said.

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Europe
3:45 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

As Pressures Mount On Putin, Analysts Wonder What He Hopes To Gain

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated since Russia's annexation of Crimea and there are still questions over Russian President Vladimir Putin's agenda in Ukraine and Eastern Europe. Targeted sanctions, political isolation and NATO's plans to beef up its presence in Eastern Europe haven't persuaded Putin to change course.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has more from Moscow.

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