World

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has pardoned thousands of inmates to make room in the country's overcrowded, cash-strapped prisons.

The move is "set to decongest national prisons and promote better living conditions," the state-run Herald reports. But as Reuters notes, this also comes as "prisons struggle to feed inmates due to lack of funding from the government."

ISIS is making gains near Syria's border with Turkey, seizing a string of villages and trapping tens of thousands of civilians, according to Doctors Without Borders and a Syrian monitoring group.

The offensive has forced Doctors Without Borders to evacuate a major hospital outside the strategically located town of Azaz.

As the U.S. Army Air Corps prepared to unleash the world's first attack by an atomic bomb on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, Japanese schoolgirl Kikue Takagi, age 12, woke up feeling sick and stayed home that day.

Her classmates were sent to Hiroshima's city center to clean up debris, doing their part in the war effort as Japan struggled to hold off the rapidly approaching U.S. military. Those students were near ground zero when the American bomb obliterated the city.

At home on the outskirts of Hiroshima, Takagi was spared.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Examining Obama's Nuclear Legacy

May 27, 2016
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Hockey Night In Canada Punjabi Edition

May 27, 2016
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"Seventy-one years ago, on a bright, cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed," President Obama said Friday, in the first visit by a sitting U.S. president to Hiroshima, Japan.

In 1945, the United States dropped the first atomic bomb used in warfare on that city, killing an estimated 140,000 people. A second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki three days later. Within weeks, Japan surrendered, ending the war in the Pacific Theater.

Obama’s mixed record on fighting nuclear weapons

May 26, 2016
R
Petr Josek/Reuters

Shortly after taking office, President Barack Obama gave a speech in Prague outlining an ambitious plan to rid the world of nuclear weapons. The vision helped win him a Nobel Peace Prize.

But it clearly hasn't succeeded. So, how much has the president actually accomplished in containing these weapons of mass destruction?

Matthew Bunn has some answers. He’s with the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard University's Belfer Center.

The Sundarbans — a collection of densely populated islands in India’s sprawling Ganges delta — are so remote that the only way to get there is by boat. But human traffickers still manage to get in, and that's left many families with missing daughters.

Think of kwv txhiaj as song poetry.

Or better yet, think of it like a Hmong version of the blues. And in that vein, think of kwv txhiaj the way American writer Ralph Ellison thought of the blues: "an autobiographical chronicle of personal catastrophe expressed lyrically." 

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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