World

The Two-Way
5:49 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Alcoholics Learn To Make Their Own Beer In Canadian Program

Tyler BigChild, a board member of Vancouver's Drug Users Resource Center, is also part of its Brew Co-Op. The group teaches alcoholics how to make beer and wine, in the hopes that they'll stop risky behavior such as drinking rubbing alcohol.
Portland Hotel Society

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 6:59 pm

Call it a new twist on the old "teach a man to fish" adage. A group in Vancouver, British Columbia, is teaching inveterate alcoholics to brew their own beer and make their own wine, in an attempt to keep them from drinking unsafe liquids to get an alcoholic high.

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The Edge
4:06 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Same Banned Substance Fells German Biathlete, Italian Bobsledder

Germany's Evi Sachenbacher-Stehle has left her country's Olympic contingent — and Sochi — after testing positive for a banned stimulant. She's seen here in the biathlon earlier this week; Sachenbacher-Stehle finished fourth.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Germany's Sochi 2014 contingent is reeling from the news that Evi Sachenbacher-Stehle, a former Olympic medalist in cross-country skiing who took fourth place in the biathlon Monday, has tested positive for banned substances at the Sochi Winter Olympics. An Italian athlete also tested positive, officials said Friday.

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Europe
3:21 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

What It Means When The 'Wolf Cries Wolf': Fascism In Ukraine

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 6:53 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. What does it mean when the wolf cries wolf? Timothy Snyder poses that question, referring to leaders and propagandists in Ukraine and Russia, who denounced the protestors in Kiev's Independence Square as fascists. Snyder is a Yale historian who writes about Ukraine in a forthcoming issue of the New York Review of Books, and he joins us now from Vienna. Welcome to the program.

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Europe
3:21 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

The Ties that Bind Eastern Ukraine To Russia

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 6:53 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Let's get a view now on the events in Ukraine from the eastern part of that country. Russian is the first language of most of the people who live there, and many support closer ties with Russia. Sergei Shtukarin is executive director of the Center for Political Studies in the industrial city of Donetsk. Mr. Shtukarin, welcome to the program.

SERGEI SHTUKARIN: Thank you.

SIEGEL: And what kind of picture people there had of the events in Kiev this week? What are they seeing on television? What are they hearing on radio?

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Europe
3:21 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

In Kiev, Leaders Ink A Deal — But Will The People Follow?

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 6:53 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

An uneasy calm settled over Kiev today since opposition leaders signed a peace deal with Ukraine's president, Viktor Yanukovych. But after three days of fighting left scores of people dead, protesters are still trying to decide if the deal is worth the sacrifice. Despite their demands, Yanukovych remains in place, although there will be early elections.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Tymoshenko May Soon Be Free

In Kiev last month, this anti-government protester in protective gear stood in front of a poster featuring an image of former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko. Her jailing on what supporters believe were bogus charges was among the complaints protesters raised.
Darko Bandic AP

There's another big breaking story from Ukraine, where earlier today an agreement was reached to hopefully end what in recent days had been a deadly series of clashes between anti-government protesters and security forces:

Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who has been in jail since 2011 on what her supporters say were trumped-up charges aimed at silencing one of President Viktor Yanukovych critics, may soon be free again.

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The Edge
11:40 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Team USA's Mikaela Shiffrin Wins Skiing Gold

She's a winner: Team USA's Mikaela Shiffrin celebrates after taking gold in the women's slalom at the Sochi Games.
Olivier Morin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 5:06 am

Eighteen-year-old Mikaela Shiffrin has lived up to her reputation as the pre-race favorite by winning the gold medal in women's slalom at the Sochi Winter Olympics.

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World
10:59 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Being A World Away When Your Country Is In Crisis

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:11 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to start the program today talking about two disturbing situations from two different parts of the world that have been very much in the news this week. There are the violent protests in Ukraine that have been going on all week. More than 70 people have died there. And while the Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and opposition leaders have reached an agreement to end the violence, tensions are still very high there.

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Barbershop
10:59 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Are The Barbershop Guys Sorry They Are Not Idris Elba?

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:11 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Fri February 21, 2014

U.S. Official: Beijing Preparing For 'Short, Sharp' War With Japan

A ceremony is held to mark a new patrol vessel in service for China's marine surveillance in Zhoushan, east China's Zhejiang Province, last month.
Shen Lei Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 2:21 pm

China is stepping up war games in preparation for a possible conflict with Japan over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands, a tiny island chain in the East China Sea claimed by both Beijing and Tokyo, a senior U.S. Navy official says.

Captain James Fanell, deputy chief of staff intelligence and information operations for the U.S. Pacific Fleet, made the remark at a conference put on by the U.S. Naval Institute in San Diego last week.

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